Arkansas Genealogy – Free Arkansas Genealogy

This Arkansas state page of our website provides direct links to major databases and historical titles and information found on Arkansas genealogy and history, whether they exist on our site, or across the web.

Arkansas African American Records

  • Arkansas African American Records
    • WPA Slave Narratives
      Slave narratives are stories of surviving slaves told in their own words and ways. Unique, colorful, and authentic, these slave narratives provide a look at the culture of the South during slavery which heretofore had not been told.

Arkansas Bible Records

Arkansas Biographies

Arkansas Cemetery Records

  • Arkansas Cemetery Records
    Arkansas Cemetery records are listed by county then name of cemetery within the Arkansas county. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we provide only a partial listing.

    • Cemetery census of Arkansas
      Magnolia, Columbia; Conway, Faulkner; London, Pope; West Helena, Phillips; —  Chalybeat Springs,   P e r s o n , Columbia;  BARLOW,   Evenezer,  Frazier,  MT. Vernon,  Westem, Miller,  Salem,  Sharmon,  Sawrna, Oak Grove, Pleasant Hill,  Price, L. 0, 0. F,  Hartford Memorial Park   Cemeteries, etc. FHB

Arkansas Census Records

Arkansas Church Records and History

Arkansas Court Records

Arkansas Directories

Arkansas Genealogy

  • Fathers of the ridge
    Genealogical sketches of Greene County, Arkansas
  • Ancestor charts of the Saline County History and Heritage Society members
    Rowland, Leon; Moore, Orene; Saline County History and Heritage Society (Arkansas)
  • Lineage charts and family group sheets
    submitted by members of Hempstead County Genealogical Society

  • Arkansas pioneers
    Compiled local and family histories from the Clayton Library.
  • A family history : Adcock, John, of Buckingham County, Virginia
    Some of his descendants : with collateral lines: Christian, McMurtry, Robertson, Ingersoll, etc. John Adcock, of Scottish-Irish descent, emigrated from England in late 1600s or early 1700s and settled in Buckingham County, Virginia. His son, Joseph Adcock, served in the American Revolution. He married first, Susan Cason (d. 1804). They had thirteen children, ca. 1754-1804. Joseph and his second wife, migrated to Kanawha County, Virginia (now West Virginia) in 1814. Descendants of his sons, John and Joel, listed, lived in Tennessee, Arkansas, Missouri, Illinois, Georgia, Mississippi, and elsewhere.
  • A history of the Albright family
    Thomas Finley Allbright was born in 1853 near Capps, Arkansas, married Sarah Anne Gilliam at age 24 and died in 1900. Includes Allbright, Albrecht, Moore and allied families.
  • A Berry history
    Record contains an accounty of John and Jane Campbell Berry of Washington County, Virginia and some of their descendants in Virginia, Tennessee, Alabama, Arkansas, Oregon and other states.
  • A biographical sketch of the life, ancestors and descendants of Robert Exum Coffey (1858 – 1939) of Boone County, Arkansas
    Robert Exum Coffey (1858-1939), son of Jonathan Norman Coffey and Permelia Spencer Cloyd, was born in Yardelle, Arkansas. He married Ida Mae Crumpler, daughter of William Crumpler and Mary Ann Cockerham, in 1881.
  • A bit about the past for Calvin, Barbara, and Ruby
    Genealogy for Cotton, Castoe, Pendelton, Batesel, Coots families : from 1068-2008 A.D. John Cotton was born in 1626 and lived in Conington, Huntingdonshire, England. He married Anne Hucheson and they had nine children. He died in Virginia. Ancestors, descendants and relatives lived mainly in England, Virginia, North Carolina, Arkansas, Missouri, Utah, Idaho and California.
  • A Dysart lineage, seven generations
    Information on seven generations of the Dysart family line, beginning with Samuel Dysart of Ireland c. 1746. Continues with the Dysart family coming to the United States and settling in Virginia, Maryland and Kentucky, and later moving west. James Dysart, son of Samuel and Frances Anderson Dysart, ” … was born in 1744 in County, Donegal, Ireland. In 1775 he married Agnes Beattie in Botetourt County, Virginia. He died on May 26, 1818 in Rock Castle County, Kentucky.”–P. 22. Descendants and relatives lived in Virginia, Maryland, Kentucky, Tennessee, Illinois, Missouri, Arkansas, Utah and elsewhere.
  • The first Donahoe families in Fort Smith, Arkansas, 1848
  • The Edmistons of Washington County, Arkansas
    David Edmiston (b.ca.1760) was born in North Carolina, and married Anne Brevard in either North Carolina or Tennessee. They moved in 1818 from Tennessee to Clark County, Arkansas. Descendants and relatives lived in North Carolina, Tennessee, Arkansas and elsewhere.
  • 2000 years, the families of Foster and Mansell
    Stephen Moore Foster, born February 2, 1844 at Dekalb County, Tennessee, son of William Golden Foster and Minerva Spurlock. He married Mary Pearl Patterson and Rebecca Marilza Blythe Pruitt. He died on January 1, 1902 at Roseville, Arkansas.
  • A Gallaher family history : James H. and Sarah E. Gallaher and their descendants
    James Gallaher (ca. 1730-1792) was born in Ireland. He and his wife, Sarah E. Miller, were in the Cumberland Valley in Pennsylvania in 1762. They later settled in Washington County, Tennessee in 1783. Descendants lived in Tennessee, Illinois, Arkansas.
  • A Graham family of Boone County, Arkansas
    Eli Frazier Graham (1839-1916) and wife Narcissus Lucindy Ellen Wadley (1848-1933) with some earlier generations and collateral lineages. Eli Frazier Graham (1839-1916), son of James M. Graham and Mary Robinson, was born in Bolivar, Missouri. He married Narcissus Lucindy Ellen Wadley (1848-1933) in 1866.
  • A Graham genealogy
    William Graham was born in Ulster Province, Ireland, the son of Richard and Nancy Graham. His family immigrated to Pennsylvania when he was young. He later migrated to North Carolina. He married Margaret Graham, daughter of James and Jane Graham of Rowan County, in 1767. They settled in Mecklenburg County, where they had nine sons, 1769- 1790. He was a singner of the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independance in 1775. He died in 1818. His grandson, William Graham (1814-1861) was born at Charlotte, North Carolina, the son of Sam and Abigail Shinn Graham. He migrated to Georgia where he married Louisa B. Dungegan. They had ten children, 1840-1859, all born in Georgia. The family migrated to Pleasant Valley (later Naylor) Arkansas in 1861. He died there. Descendants listed lived in Arkansas, Illinois and elsewhere.
  • A genealogy of the Hammer and Spoon families
    John Hammer immigrated to the U.S. and eventually settled in Randolph County, North Carolina. His descendant, John Hammer, son of Abraham and Catherine Hammer was born in 1814 in North Carolina. He married Jane Spoon in 1832, daughter of John and Sophia. Descendants live in North Carolina, Indiana, Tennessee, Missouri, Arkansas, and elsewhere.
  • A genealogy of all the descendants of Ephriam Knight through John Knight
    James Valentine Knight was a veteran of the War of 1812. He was the son of Ephriam Knight who had migrated from Maryland to Virginia. James married a Miss Kindal in Virginia and they migrated to Ross County, Ohio where their family was reared. Descendants lived in Indiana, Pennsylvania, New York, Missouri, Arkansas and elsewhere.
  • 200 Years of London family in America
    Amos London (1737-1805), a Quaker, served in the Revolutionary Army, and moved from New Jersey to Surry County, North Carolina in 1777. Descendants lived in New Jersey, North Carolina, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona
  • May and Keith families of Arkansas
  • A Genealogy of the McCullah-Wasson families, 1700-1967
    Thomas Robertson (1763-1834) immigrated from Ireland to Virginia in 1780. He married Elizabeth Lane (1771-1838) in 1789 in Amherst County, Tennessee. Their daughter, Lucy married Alexander McCullah in 1819. Descendants lived in Tennessee, Kentucky, Arkansas, Iowa, Missouri and elsewhere.
  • A family history of Luther and Vera Merriman, 1883-2004
    Luther Merriman was born 10 September 1912 in Doniphan, Missouri. His parents were Jess A. Merriman (1883-1942) and Hattie Belle West (1885-1959). He married Vera Beatrice Gregory, daughter of Samuel Afton Gregory (1878-1958) and Rosa Jones Horn (1880-1959), 16 September 1934 in Pelsor, Arkansas. They had three children. Luther died in 1982 in Independence, Missouri.
  • A Brief history of the Pettit and Spruce families in Boone County, Arkansas : ca. 1818-1925
  • The Rhoads family newsletter
    by the Rhoads Cemetery and Family Association,

  • A history and genealogy of the Ruddle family, 1695-1941
    John Ruddell (ca.1695-1781) emigrated from England to Chester County, Pennsylvania about 1717, and married Mary Cook. The family moved to Augusta County, Virginia between 1743 and 1747. Descendants lived in Virginia, Kentucky, Missouri, Arkansas and elsewhere.
  • 13 generations of Sabin families
    Life stories of David Sabin (1807-1882), Elizabeth Dowart (1811-1891); life stories of David Dorwart Sabin (1841-1899), Mary Powell (1843-1929); life stories of David Sabin (1868-1947), Julia Elizabeth Pfiste.
  • A branch of the Stallings/Stillions family tree
    Richard Stallings was born in about 1630 in Lincolnshire, England. He married Lavaria Kingland, daughter of Anthony Kingland. They had seven children. They emigrated in 1652 and settled in Calvert County, Maryland. Descendants and relatives lived mainly in Maryland, Virginia, Missouri and Arkansas.
  • A history of one–of the many–John Williams families in America
    John Williams immigrated from Wales to land near Norfolk, Virginia, served in the Revolutionary War, probably married twice, and moved after the war to North Carolina and then to Madison County, Tennessee. Descendants lived in Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Texas and elsewhere.
  • Kith and kin of Georgia Ridge, Crawford County, Arkansas
    Abel, Adams, Chastain, Ferguson, Rogers, Sinclair, et. al.

Arkansas Genealogy Websites

Arkansas Genealogy

The Original Arkansas Genealogy

ChicotCleburneCraighead, Drew, Faulkner, Greene, Johnson, Lafayette, Lawrence, Lovely, Madison, MississippiPoinsett, St. Francis, Stone, Washington, Yell

ARGenWeb
ARGenWeb is created by a group of volunteers as part of the USGenWeb Project working together to provide free genealogy websites for genealogical research in every county in Arkansas. This Project is non-commercial and fully committed to free genealogy access for everyone.

Arkansas, Ashley, Baxter, Benton, Boone, Bradley, Calhoun, Carroll, Chicot, Clark, Clay, Cleburne, Cleveland, Columbia, Conway, Craighead, Crawford, Crittenden, Cross, Dallas, Desha, Dorsey, Drew, Faulkner, Franklin, Fulton, Garland, Grant, Greene, Hempstead, Hot Spring, Howard, Independence, Izard, Jackson, Jefferson, Johnson, Lafayette, Lawrence, Lee, Lincoln, Little River, Logan, Lonoke, Lovely, Madison, Marion, Miller, Mississippi, Monroe, Montgomery, Nevada, Newton, Ouachita, Perry, Phillips, Pike, Poinsett, Polk, Pope, Prairie, Pulaski, Randolph, St. Francis, Saline, Scott, Searcy, Sebastian, Sevier, Sharp, Stone, Union, Van Buren, Washington, White, Woodruff, Yell

Arkansas History

Arkansas County Histories

Arkansas Town Histories

Arkansas Land Records

Arkansas Maps

Arkansas Military Records

Arkansas Native American Records

Arkansas Newspapers

Arkansas Newspaper Transcriptions

Arkansas Obituaries

Arkansas Periodicals

Arkansas Research Guides

Arkansas School Records

Arkansas Vital Records

Arkansas Yearbooks

United States Bureau of Land Management Tract Books, 1800-c. 1955

3,907 land management tract books containing official records of the land status and transactions involving surveyed public lands arranged by state and then by township and range. These books indicate who obtained the land, and include a physical description of the tract and where the land is located. The type of transaction is also recorded such as cash entry, credit entry, homesteads, patents (deeds) granted by the Federal Government, and other conveyances of title such as Indian allotments, internal improvement grants (to states), military bounty land warrants, private land claims, railroad grants, school grants, and swamp grants. Additional items of information included in the tract books are as follows: number of acres, date of sale, purchase price, land office, entry number, final Certificate of Purchase number, and notes on relinquishments and conversions.

ARGenWeb – Arkansas State USGenWeb

A list linking to the ARGenWeb county websites. ARGenWeb is created by a group of volunteers as part of the USGenWeb Project working together to provide free genealogy websites for genealogical research in every county in Alabama. This Project is non-commercial and fully committed to free genealogy access for everyone.

Arkansas World War 2 Casualties – Army, Air Force

This database contains War Department casualties (Army and Army Air Force personnel) from World War II for Arkansas. Information provided includes serial number, rank and type of casualty. The birthplace or residence of the deceased is not indicated. An introduction explaining how the list was compiled, a statistical tabulation, and the descriptions of the types of casualties incurred are also included.

The Stokes Treaty Commission

The Osage who left their old home and removed to the Verdigris, were known as the Arkansas Osage. They had no agent until 1822 when Nathaniel Philbrook was appointed sub-agent for them. He was drowned at the mouth of Grand River the latter part of March, 1824 as...

Small Town Newspapers

Small Town Papers gives you free access to the people, places and events recorded in real time over the decades or even centuries! Browse and search the scanned newspaper archive from 1846 up to the current edition! Their archives contain millions of names of ancestors not found anywhere else. Enhance your Ancestry research with their high resolution scanned newspaper archive. Find distant relatives and discover your ethnic heritage by reading the articles about family and friends written back in the day.

Governor Houston at His Trading Post on the Verdigris

In February, 1828, the vanguard of Creek immigrants arrived at the Creek Agency on the Verdigris, in charge of Colonel Brearley, and they and the following members of the McIntosh party were located on a section of land that the Government promised in the treaty of 1826 to purchase for them. By the treaty of May 6, 1828, the Government assigned the Cherokee a great tract of land, to which they at once began to remove from their homes in Arkansas. The movement had been under way for some months when there appeared among the Indians the remarkable figure of Samuel Houston. The biographers of Houston have told the world next to nothing of his sojourn of three or four years in the Indian country, an interesting period when he was changing the entire course of his life and preparing for the part he was to play in the drama of Texas.

The Osage Massacre

When the treaty council with the Osage at Fort Gibson broke up in disagreement on April 2, 1833, three hundred Osage warriors under the leadership of Clermont departed for the west to attack the Kiowa. It was Clermont’s boast that he never made war on the whites and never made peace with his Indian enemies. At the Salt Plains where the Indians obtained their salt, within what is now Woodward County, Oklahoma, they fell upon the trail of a large party of Kiowa warriors going northeast toward the Osage towns above Clermont’s. The Osage immediately adapted their course to that pursued by their enemies following it back to what they knew would be the defenseless village of women, children, and old men left behind by the warriors. The objects of their cruel vengeance were camped at the mouth of Rainy-Mountain Creek, a southern tributary of the Washita, within the present limits of the reservation at Fort Sill.

Calendar History of the Kiowa Indians

The Calendar History of the Kiowa Indians is a work of over 300 pages and is an original contribution of the highest value to ethnography. Its title affords but an imperfect idea of its scope; for, in addition to an elaborate description of the Kiowa calendars, the author gives us, in 106 pages, a sketch of the tribe including its documentary history, a list of western military and trading posts, an extensive glossary of the Kiowa language, and other items of information which lead to a thorough understanding of the calendars.

Fort Smith (Westark) Junior College Yearbooks 1929-2003

The Boreham Library at the University of Arkansas – Fort Smith, enabled 72 copies of the university yearbooks to be digitized and made freely available online, 1929-2003. The yearbooks during this period was known as the “Pioneer” and “Nuna”. Yearbooks provide a window into student life. From sports teams to clubs, fashions to hairstyles, these volumes document the changing attitudes and culture of college students year by year.

Washington Irving at Fort Gibson, 1832

The McIntosh Creeks had been located along Arkansas River near the Verdigris on fertile timbered land which they began at once to clear, cultivate, and transform into productive farms. The treaty of 1828 with the Cherokee gave the latter a great tract of land on both...

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