Pennsylvania Genealogy – Free Pennsylvania Genealogy

Pennsylvania Genealogy. This state page of our website provides direct links to free Pennsylvania genealogy databases and historical titles and information found on Pennsylvania Genealogy, whether they exist on our site, or across the web.

Pennsylvania Black Genealogy

Pennsylvania Cemeteries

Pennsylvania Census Records

Pennsylvania Genealogy

United States Genealogy

Kathi Reid’s Pennsylvania Websites

USGenWeb Project

Adams, Allegheny, Armstrong, Beaver, Bedford, Berks, Blair, Bradford, Bucks, Butler, Cambria, Cameron, Carbon, Centre, Chester, Clarion, Clearfield, Clinton, Columbia, Crawford, Cumberland, Dauphin, Delaware, Elk, Erie, Fayette, Forest, Franklin, Fulton, Greene, Huntingdon, Indiana, Jefferson, Juniata, Lackawanna, Lancaster, Lawrence, Lebanon, Lehigh, Luzerne, Lycoming, McKean, Mercer, Mifflin, Monroe, Montgomery, Montour, Northampton, Northumberland, Perry, Philadelphia, Pike, Potter, Schuylkill, Snyder, Somerset, Sullivan, Susquehanna, Tioga, Union, Venango, Warren, Washington, Wayne, Westmoreland, Wyoming, York

American History and Genealogy Project

Lancaster, Union

Pennsylvania History

Pennsylvania Military Records

  • Military Records
    • Pennsylvania Indian Forts
      Examine and report to the next session of the Legislature upon the advisability of marking by suitable tablets the various forts erected against the Indians by the early settlers of this Commonwealth prior to the year 1783.
    • Pennsylvania Forts
      List of colonial forts, trading posts, named camps, redoubts, reservations, general hospitals, national cemeteries, etc., established or erected in the United States from its earliest settlement to 1902.
    • PA National Guard Veterans’ Card File, 1867-1921
      Consists of 4″ x 6″ cards originally maintained by the Office of the Adjutant General. Data generally shown about each veteran includes name, rank, age, physical description (height, complexion, hair and eye color), occupation and residence; the date and place of enlistment; the date and reason for discharge; and the unit (company and regiment) to which assigned. Information about federal service rendered by the veteran and the date of death or first appearance in the military records also routinely appears.
    • Revolutionary War
      • 1840 Pensioners Census
      • Revolutionary War Pension Records
      • Revolutionary War Military Abstract Card File
        Arranged alphabetically by surname of soldier. The abstract card file contains transcriptions of data extracted from original records in the custody of the State Archives concerning Revolutionary War service in the Pennsylvania Militia, Pennsylvania Line, and the Navy. Note that duty after November 1783 is not considered Revolutionary War service. Information provided is name and rank of soldier, whether active or inactive duty, county of residence, battalion in which served, and record from which information was extracted. Also noted are whether soldier was delinquent and fined or whether militia fines were abated.
      • Militia Officers Index Cards, 1775-1800
        Index card file of the names of Pennsylvania militia officers who served during the American Revolution, in Indian campaigns in northwestern Pennsylvania, and in quelling the Whiskey Rebellion. The cards are arranged alphabetically by surname of officer. Information provided is name, county, rank, company or battalion, dates of service, township, and occasionally district within township. In rare cases, other pertinent information is provided such as place of burial, wounds received, names of children, names of any expeditions or campaigns, name of person whom they succeeded, and date discharged.
    • Civil War Records
      • Pennsylvania Civil War Battlefield Map
      • Civil War Pensions Index Cards
        Each card gives the soldier’s name, unit, the application number, the certificate number and the state from which the soldier served. In some cases, the soldier’s rank, terms of service, date of death and place of death are given. The index cards refer to pension applications of veterans who served in the U.S. Army between 1861 and 1917. The majority of the records pertain to Civil War veterans, but they also include veterans of the Spanish-American War, the Philippine Insurrection, Indian wars, and World War I.
      • Civil War Veterans’ Card File, 1861-1866
        These 3″ x 5″ cards were initially prepared to serve as an index to Samuel Penniman Bates’ “History of Pennsylvania Volunteers, 1861-1865,” (Harrisburg, 1869-1871). The Office of the Adjutant General later expanded the scope of the cards by transcribing onto them data found on the original Civil War Muster Rolls and Related Records, 1861-1866 {series #19.11}. The information generally includes the soldiers’ names, military units, Bates’ citations (volume and page), ages at enrollment, descriptions (complexion, height, color of hair and eyes), residences and birthplaces; the dates and places where enrolled; the dates and places where mustered in; and the dates of discharge. The listing is not inclusive.
    • Spanish American War
      • Spanish American War Veterans’ Card File of United States Volunteers
        The card file of veterans who participated in the Spanish-American War was created by the Office of the Adjutant General in 1941 from information taken from the official records of the United States War Department. Information found about each veteran includes name, race, residence, place and date of birth, date and place of enlistment, military organization to which attached, rank, and dates serving overseas in either Cuba or the Philippines. Sometimes extensive comments at the bottom of the cards provide information on the reasons for, and the type of, discharge as well as a record of prior military service.
    • Mexican Border War
      • Mexican Border Campaign Veterans’ Card File
        These cards, bearing the title “Mexican Emergency, Call of President, June 18, 1916,” contain the following information about veterans: name and rank, regiment and company, age and place of birth, a physical description (height, complexion, hair and eye color), date of commission or enlistment into service, home station and date of rendezvous, and date of acceptance into United States service. Additional remarks may indicate the date that the soldier’s enlistment was to expire and the name and address of a person to be contacted in case of an emergency. All of the cards also bear a stamp indicating that a Mexican Service Medal was issued to the veteran, along with a corresponding number.
    • World War I Records
      • World War 1 Draft Registration Records
      • World War I Service Medal Application Cards
        These cards were originally submitted by veterans and their survivors who applied for service medals in accordance with the Act of April 21, 1937 P.L. 331, sections 1 and 2. Information provided about each veteran consists of name and serial number, place of residence at time of entry into service, date and place the veteran entered into service, rank, military unit to which attached, place and date of honorable discharge, and the signature of the applicant. Also present are the initials of the person by whom the remittance was received and of the person acting on behalf of the Adjutant General, and each card is stamped with the date of approval. The reverse side of each card shows the name of the veteran or survivor applying for the medal, and the residence to which the medal was to be mailed.
    • World War II Records
    • Korean War Casualty List
    • Vietnam War Casualty List

Pennsylvania Native American Records

Pennsylvania Newspapers

Pennsylvania Orphan Records

  • Lutheran Orphans’ Home and Asylum, Germantown PA 1892-1914
    Philadelphia has been justly noted for its many charitable and benevolent institutions. Among these the "Orphans' Home and Asylum for the Aged and Infirm of the Evangelical Lutheran Church at Germantown" holds a conspicuous place. When so many children were made orphans during the late war, this institution was among the first to open its doors for these soldiers' orphans, and 98 were admitted up to the time when the State provided homes for them. Including with these reports are names and ages of the orphans who were present during the year.

Pennsylvania Vital Records

 

The Crum family in America

The Crum family in America deals with a particular set of Crums — a set that hailed from the Lower Rhineland, Germany, and settled originally in Pennsylvania or Virginia. It does not attempt by any means to deal with all those having the name “Crum”. Our story begins with the coming of Anthony Crum, Sr. and Matthias Crum, Sr. to America.

Genealogy of the Shanks family in America

David Shanks is descended from Thomas Shanks, who was living in Washington Township, York County, Pennsylvania by 1763 when he first appears on a land warrant there. The genealogy then deals with the descendants of David and Hannah Morrison Shanks of Amsterdam, Botetourt County, Virginia, the second son of said Thomas.

Genealogy: Stitgen, Steele, Doane, Newman, Rapp

The Stitgen family comprises most of the book, and starts with Theodor and Barbare (Wollgrafs) Stutgen (the family would variously spell their name as Stutgen, Stuttgen, Stuettgen, and Stitgen.) Theodore Stitgen, grandson of Theodor Stutgen would immigrate to Richfield, Wisconsin about 1850 and eventually settled in Hillsboro, Oregon.

The Doane family starts with Christina Barnet from Annandale Scotland, who’s husband _____ Doane, died while in Scotland. She settled in Waunakee Wisconsin in 1853, with her twin sons, Andrew and Peter. The progenitor of the Rapp family, Peter and Susan (Marsh) Rapp, started in Pennsylvania and moved their family to Dane Township, Wisconsin in 1848. The Steele family starts with Robert and Nancy (Dunshee) Steele of Armagh County, Northern Ireland, who met on the voyage to America in 1801. They settled near Bovina, Delaware County, New York. The Newman family starts with John and Mary Newman of Polajewo Poland. They immigrated to America together in 1853 and settled in Madison, Wisconsin.

The Boyd Family of Mercelia Louise Boyd

The manuscript provides a short history of the Boyd family in ancient Scotland and of Thomas Boyd of Marsh Creek, Pennsylvania and the Manor of Maske. The genealogy of the book itself starts with William Boyd (c1700/10-1767), the immigrant, who settled in Cumberland Township in what was then York County, Pennsylvania, but is now Adams County, Pennsylvania. This manuscript traces the Boyd and allied lines up to 1935. Includes the allied families of Bell, Bracken, Culler, Cunningham, Finley, Gaut, Hoover, Hough, Markley, McGrew, Parrish, Perry, Pinkerton, Scholl, Speer, Warfel, Welday, Williams

Fisher Genealogical History

This manuscript starts with Sebastian Fisher, a native of Germany, with his wife Susanna and their two small children, embarked for England at Rotterdam, Holland, on July 28, 1708. The family came with the intention of settling on land in the Schoharie Valley in New York, but found on arrival that they did not hold legal tender to the land, since the land was not first purchased from the Native Americans. Sebastian then moved with other German immigrants who had also purchased land to the Tulpehocken Valley of Pennsylvania, where he settled his family. The 76 pages of the manuscript take some of the descendants of Sebastian and Susanna Fisher into the 20th century.

Pennsylvania World War 2 Casualties – Army, Air Force

This database contains War Department casualties (Army and Army Air Force personnel) from World War II for Pennsylvania. Information provided includes serial number, rank and type of casualty. The birthplace or residence of the deceased is not indicated. An introduction explaining how the list was compiled, a statistical tabulation, and the descriptions of the types of casualties incurred are also included.

Small Town Newspapers

Small Town Papers gives you free access to the people, places and events recorded in real time over the decades or even centuries! Browse and search the scanned newspaper archive from 1846 up to the current edition! Their archives contain millions of names of ancestors not found anywhere else. Enhance your Ancestry research with their high resolution scanned newspaper archive. Find distant relatives and discover your ethnic heritage by reading the articles about family and friends written back in the day.

Ancestors of George Mitchell Hooper of Bridgewater, MA

The Hooper family, to which belonged the late George Mitchell Hooper, one of Bridgewater’s well-known citizens, is an old and distinguished one in New England. George Mitchell Hooper, son of Mitchell, was born in the town of Bridgewater Sept. 1, 1838. He received his education in the public schools and Bridgewater Academy, later attending Peirce Academy and the State normal school at Bridgewater, graduating from the latter institution in 1857. After leaving school he engaged in teaching, a profession he followed for one year and then began the manufacture of brick with his father, a business in which he engaged for half a century. He was also a surveyor. He was identified with the banking interests of Bridgewater, having been one of the trustees of the Bridgewater Savings Bank, also filling the office of clerk. He was clerk and treasurer of the Bridgewater Cemetery Association; a member of the Plymouth County Agricultural Association, of which for years he was treasurer, and was secretary; and trustee of the Memorial Public Library. He died July 2, 1909, in his seventy-first year. On Oct. 16, 1861, Mr. Hooper was married to Mary E. Josselyn, who was born at Hanson, Mass., daughter of Hervey and Elizabeth (Howland) Josselyn. She died Jan. 30, 1884, and was buried in Mount Prospect cemetery. Eight children were born of this marriage.

Ancestors of Horace Alden Keith of Brockton, MA

Horace Alden Keith, founder of the Brockton Webbing Company, one of the successful and thriving industries of Brockton, and one of that city’s enterprising and progressive business men, is a descendant on both his paternal and maternal sides of historic old New England ancestry. Mr. Keith was born in West Bridgewater May 25, 1862, eldest son of the late Henry Snell and Thalia (Alden) Keith. The ancestral line of the branch of the Keith family in this country to which Horace Alden Keith belongs, and which follows, is given in chronological order from the first American ancestor. Rev. James Keith, born in 1644, was educated in Aberdeen, Scotland (as tradition says at the expense of a maiden aunt), where he was graduated likely from Marischal College, his name appearing on the roll of 1657, said college having been founded by George, the fifth Earl of Keith Marischal, in 1593. At the age of eighteen years he emigrated to this country, arriving at Boston in 1662. He was introduced to the church at Bridgewater by Dr. Increase Mather, and became settled as the minister of the Bridgewater Church Feb. 18, 1664. Rev. James Keith passed away in West Bridgewater July 23, 1719, aged seventy-six years, having labored in the ministry of the town for fifty-six years.

Ancestors of William J. Rotch of New Bedford, MA

At New Bedford, this Commonwealth, a point so long famous the world round for its whaling industry, a business carried on to an extent and success that made it the wealthiest place in proportion to its population of any point in New England, and a city that has since been hardly less conspicuous as a cotton manufacturing point, there still reside representatives of the Rotch family; here where, since the middle of the eighteenth century, have lived seven or eight generations of Rotches, than whom as a family perhaps no other has had greater influence in developing New Bedford’s character and prosperity and shaping its history.

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