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Chasta Tribe

Chasta Tribe. A tribe, probably Athapascan, residing on Siletz Reservation, Oregon, in 1867, with the Skoton and Umpqua, of which latter they were then said to have formed a part. The Chasta, Skoton, and Umpqua were distinct tribes which concluded a treaty Nov. 18, 1854. The Chasta were divided into the Kwilsieton and Nahelta, both residing on Rogue River. J. O. Dorsey thought these may have been identical with Kushetunne and Nakatkhetunne of the Tututunne. Kane, in 1859, located them near Umpqua River. In 1867 the Chasta, the Scoton, and the Umpqua together, at Siletz agency, numbered 49 males and 74 females, total 123.

They may be identical with the Chastacosta or form a part of the Takillua. They do not seem to have any connection with the Shasta, who did not extend down Rogue River below Table Rock, and who were generally bitterly at war with their Athapascan neighbors.


MLA Source Citation:

Hodge, Frederick Webb, Compiler. The Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico. Bureau of American Ethnology, Government Printing Office. 1906. AccessGenealogy.com. Web. 12 February 2016.
https://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/chasta-tribe-2.htm
- Last updated on Jan 13th, 2015

This page is part of a larger collection. Access the full collection at Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico.

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