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Topic: Wyandot

An Historical Sketch of the Tionontates or Dinondadies, now called Wyandots

The tribe which, from the time of Washington’s visit to the Ohio, in 1753, down to their removal to the West, played so important a part under the name of Wyandots, but who were previously known by a name which French write Tionontates; and Dutch, Dinondadies, have a history not uneventful, and worthy of being traced clearly to distinguish them from the Hurons or Wyandots proper, of whom they absorbed one remnant, leaving what were later only a few families near Quebec, to represent the more powerful nation.

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Indian Mounds throughout North America

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Charlevoix and Tantiboth speak of Indians who inhabited the region of country around Lake Michigan, who were well skilled in the art of erecting mounds and fortifications, Charlevoix also states that the Wyandots and the Six Nations disinterred their dead and took the bones from their graves where they had lain for several years and carried them to a large pit previously prepared, in which they deposited them, with the property of the deceased, filling up the pit with earth and erected a mound over it. A string of sleigh-bells much...

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Moravian Massacre at Gnadenbrutten

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now In the early part of the year 1763 two Moravian missionaries, Post and Heckewelder, established a mission among the Tuscarawa Indians, and in a few years they had three nourishing missionary stations, viz: Shoenbrun, Gnadenbrutten and Salem, which were about five miles apart and fifty miles west of the present town of Steubenville, Ohio. During our Revolutionary War their position being midway between the hostile Indians (allies of the British) on the Sandusky River, and our frontier settlements, and therefore on the direct route of the...

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Early Exploration and Native Americans

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now De Soto and his band gave to the Choctaws at Moma Binah and the Chickasaws at Chikasahha their first lesson in the white man’s modus operandi to civilize and Christianize North American Indians; so has the same lesson been continued to be given to that unfortunate people by his white successors from that day to this, all over this continent, but which to them, was as the tones of an alarm-bell at midnight. And one hundred and twenty-three years have passed since our forefathers declared all men of every nationality to be free and equal on the soil of the North American continent then under their jurisdiction, except the Africans whom they held in slavery, and the Native Americans against whom they decreed absolute extermination because they could not also enslave them; to prove which, they at once began to hold out flattering-inducements to the so-called oppressed people of all climes under the sun, to come to free America and assist them to oppress and kill off the Native Americans and in partnership take their lands and country, as this was more in accordance with their lust of wealth and speedy self-aggrandizement than the imagined slow process of educating, civilizing and Christianizing them, a work too con descending, too humiliating; and to demonstrate that it has been...

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A Legend Of Slaughter At The Seneca Capital

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A legend exists of. a fearful fight that, took pace between the Seneca and Wyandot, on their return from Braddock’s defeat, in 1755. They had fought side by side against the English army, but, no sooner had they dispersed toward their homes, than the old unsettled feud between them was renewed. The Seneca took the trail by Beaver, Mingo bottom, and west to Tuscarawas. The Wyandot took the tippler trail, striking the ridge between the heads of the Elk Eye Creek (Muskingum) and the Hioga (Cuyahoga.), where they camped. It was but a day’s journey across the present Stark County, to reach their enemies at the Seneca capital. The warriors there suspected their design, and sent Ogista, an old sachem, who met the Wyandot on the war-path, stealthily approaching the capital. He sent back a runner to give warning of their coming, and, trusting to his age for protection, boldly penetrated into the midst of the enemy, as a peacemaker. The Seneca, upon being apprised of their proximity, sallied out to fight, but were stopped by Ogista, who was returning with an agreement, made by him and the opposing chief, to the effect that each tribe should pick twenty warriors, willing to suffer death by single combat. When all were slain, they were to be covered, hatchet in hand, in...

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Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

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The War with the Indians of the West during Washington’s Administration

After the termination of the Revolutionary War, the hardy settlers of the west had still a contest to maintain, which often threatened their extermination. The Indian tribes of the west refused to bury the hatchet when Great Britain withdrew her armies, and they continued their terrible devastation. The vicinity of the Ohio River, especially, was the scene of their operations.

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Red Jacket and the Wyandot Claim to Supremacy

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now At a great council of the western tribes, assembled near Detroit, prior to the late war, the celebrated Seneca orator, Red Jacket, was present, when the question of the right of the Wyandots to light the council fire, was brought up. This claim he strenuously resisted, and administered a rebuke to this nation in the following terms: “Have the Quatoghies forgotten themselves? Or do they suppose we have forgotten them? Who gave you the right in the west or east, to light the general council fire? You must have fallen asleep, and dreamt that the Six Nations were dead! Who permitted you to escape from the lower country? Had you any heart left to speak a word for yourselves? Remember how you hung on by the bushes. You had not even a place to land on. You have not yet done p___g for fear of the Konoshioni. High claim, indeed, for a tribe who had to run away from the Kadarakwa. 1Hon. Albert H. Tracy. “As for you, my nephews,” he continued, turning to the Lenapees, or Delawares,” it is fit you should let another light your fire. Before Miqùon came, we had put out your fire and poured water on it; it would not burn. Could you hunt or plant without our leave? Could you...

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Wyandot and Shawnee Indian Lands

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A Schedule embracing  the names of Wyandot Indians of the Incompetent Class and Orphan Class under the Wyandot Treaty of January 31, 1855, the sales of whose lands, assigned and patented to them under said Treaty, have been confirmed by the Secretary of the Interior, upon a full examination of the report of Commissioners, Irwin and Cobb dated October 3rd 1870 and hearing of the parties interested in accordance with the 15th article of the treaty of February 23rd 1867, with certain Wyandot and other Indians in Kansas. No. of AllotmentName of ReserveeAcres 201John Bigarms44 60 202Baptists Bigtown24 75 203Sallie Bigtown24 75 204William Bigtown36 50 205John Bigtree40 50 206Mary Bigtree80 50 207Catherine Bigtree39 37 209Harley Coon120 37 213Susan Hicks40 37 214Mary Coonhawk Hicks42 30 215Zachariah Longhouse80 30 216James Monture58 30 217Susan Nofat27 84 218Moses Peacock75 84 219Daniel Peacock40 84 220James Peacock40 84 221Margaret B. Punch80 84 222Eliza Punch89 84 224John H. Standingstone98 72 226Jacob Stookey50 72 227Mary B. Skybuck26 79 231Widown, George Washington27 79 232Sarah J. Washington?? ?? 234Sarah D. Williams58 79 235Mary D. Williams55 79 238Jefferson Zane40 79 240Margaret Zane75 50 243Jacob Bigelow66 10 245Washington Boyd64 75 246Joseph Cherloe40 75 247Mary Cherloe34 75 248George Cherloe33 75 249David Cherloe39 75 250Henry Cherloe40 75 251Elisabeth Cherloe90 00 254Mary Collier28 00 255Sarah Collier28 00 258Francis Coon36 00 259Mary...

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Treaty of April 1, 1850

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of a convention concluded in the city of Washington, this first day of April, on thousand eight hundred and fifty, by and between Ardavan S. Loughery, commissioner especially appointed by the President of the United States, and the undersigned head chief and deputies of the Wyandot tribe of Indians, duly authorized and empowered to act for their tribe. Whereas, By the treaty of March 17, 1842, between the United States and the Wyandot nation of Indians, then chiefly residing within the limits of the State of Ohio, the said nation of Indians agreed to sell and transfer, and did thereby sell and transfer, to the United States their reservations of land, one hundred and nine thousand acres of which was in the State of Ohio, and Six thousand acres were in the State of Michigan, and to remove to the west of the Mississippi River: And whereas, among other stipulations it was agreed that the United States should convey to said Indians a tract of country for their permanent settlement in the Indian territory west of the Mississippi River, to contain one hundred an [and] forty-eight thousand acres of land: And whereas, The said Indians never did receive the said one hundred and forty-eight thousand acres of land from the United States, but were forced...

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Treaty of March 17, 1842

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now John Tyler, President of the United States of America, by John Johnston, formerly agent for Indian affairs, now a citizen of the State of Ohio, commissioner duly authorized and appointed to treat with the Wyandott Nation of Indians for a cession of all their lands lying and being in the States of Ohio and Michigan; and the duly constituted chiefs, counselors, and head-men, of the said Wyandott Nation, in full council assembled, on the other part, have entered into the following articles and conditions, viz: Article I. The Wyandott Nation of Indians do hereby cede to the United States all that tract of land situate, lying, and being in the county of Crawford and State of Ohio, commonly known as the residue of the large reserve, being all of their remaining lands within the State of Ohio, and containing one hundred and nine thousand one hundred and forty-four acres, more or less. The said nation also hereby cedes to the United States all their right and title to the Wyandotte Reserve, on both sides of the river Huron, in the State of Michigan, containing four thousand nine hundred and ninety-six acres, be the same more or less, being all the remaining lands claimed or set apart for the use of the Wyandotts within the State of...

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Treaty of April 23, 1836

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of a treaty made and concluded between John A. Bryan, commissioner on the part of the United States, and William Walker, John Barnett, and Peacock, chiefs and principal men of the Wyandot tribe of Indians in Ohio, acting for and on behalf of the said tribe. Article I. The Wyandot tribe of Indians in Ohio cede to the United States a strip of land five miles in extent, on the east end of their reservation in Crawford county in said State-also, one section of land lying in Cranberry Swamp, on Broken Sword Creek, being the one mile square specified and set forth in the treaty made with the said tribe on the twenty-ninth day of September in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventeen-also, one hundred and sixty acres of land, which is to be received in the place and stead of an equal quantity set apart in a supplemental treaty made with the said Indians on the seventeenth day of September in the following year, all situate and being in the said county of Crawford. Article II. The said five mile tract, as also the additional quantities herein set forth, are each to be surveyed as other public lands are surveyed by the Surveyor General, and to be sold at...

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Treaty of January 19, 1832

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of agreement and convention made and concluded at McCutcheonsville, Crawford county, Ohio, on the nineteenth day of January, 1832, by and between James B. Gardiner, specially appointed commissioner on the part of the United States, and the Chiefs, Headmen and Warriors of the band of Wyandots, residing at the Big Spring in said county of Crawford, and owning a reservation of 16,000 acres at that place. Whereas the said band of Wyandots have become fully convinced that, whilst they remain in their present situation in the State of Ohio, in the vicinity of a white population, which is continually increasing and crowding around them, they cannot prosper and be happy, and the morals of many of their people will be daily becoming more and more vitiated-And understanding that the Government of the United States is willing to purchase the reservation of land on which they reside, and for that purpose have deputed the said James B. Gardiner as special commissioner to treat for a cession for the same:-Therefore, to effect the aforesaid objects, the said Chiefs, Headmen and Warriors, and the said James B. Gardiner, have this day entered into and agreed upon the following articles of Article I. The band of Wyandots residing at the Big Spring in the county of Crawford, and State...

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Treaty of September 20, 1818

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Treaty with the Wyandot, Sept. 20, 1818. Articles of a treaty made and concluded, at St. Mary’s, in the state of Ohio, between Lewis Cass, Commissioner of the United States, thereto specially authorized by the President of the United States, and the chiefs and warriors of the Wyandot tribe of Indians. Article I. The Wyandot tribe of Indians hereby cede to the United States all the right reserved to them in two tracts of land, in the territory of Michigan, one including the village called Brownstown, and the other the village called Maguagua, formerly in the possession of the Wyandot tribe of Indians, containing in the whole not more than five thousand acres of land; which two tracts of land were reserved for the use of the said Wyandot tribe of Indians, and their descendants, for the term of fifty years, agreeably to the provisions of the act of Congress, passed February 28, 1809, and entitled “An act for the relief of certain Alabama and Wyandot Indians.” Article II. In consideration of the preceding cession, the United States will reserve, for the use of the said Wyandott Indians, sections numbered twenty-three, twenty-four, twenty-five, twenty-six, thirty-four, thirty-five, thirty-six, twenty-seven, and that part of section numbered twenty-two, which contains eight acres, and lies on the south side of...

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Treaty of July 22, 1814

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A treaty of peace and friendship between the United States of America, and the tribes of Indians called the Wyandots, Delawares, Shawanoese, Senecas, and Miamies. The said United States of America, by William Henry Harrison, late a major general in the army of the United States, and Lewis Cass, governor of the Michigan territory, duly authorized and appointed commissioners for the purpose, and the said tribes, by their head men, chiefs, and warriors, assembled at Greenville, in the state of Ohio, have agreed to the following articles, which, when ratified by the president of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate thereof, shall be binding upon them and the said tribes. Article 1. The United States and the Wyandots, Delawares, Shawanoese, and Senecas, give peace to the Miamie nation of Indians, formerly designated as the Miamie Eel River and Weea tribes; they extend this indulgence also to the bands of the Putawatimies, which adhere to the Grand Sachem Tobinipee, and to the chief Onoxa, to the Ottawas of Blanchard’s creek, who have attached themselves to the Shawanoese tribe, and to such of the said tribe as adhere to the chief called the Wing, in the neighborhood of Detroit, and to the Kickapoos, under the direction of their chiefs who sign...

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