Topic: Wyandot

An Historical Sketch of the Tionontates or Dinondadies, now called Wyandots

The tribe which, from the time of Washington’s visit to the Ohio, in 1753, down to their removal to the West, played so important a part under the name of Wyandots, but who were previously known by a name which French write Tionontates; and Dutch, Dinondadies, have a history not uneventful, and worthy of being traced clearly to distinguish them from the Hurons or Wyandots proper, of whom they absorbed one remnant, leaving what were later only a few families near Quebec, to represent the more powerful nation.

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Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

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The War with the Indians of the West during Washington’s Administration

After the termination of the Revolutionary War, the hardy settlers of the west had still a contest to maintain, which often threatened their extermination. The Indian tribes of the west refused to bury the hatchet when Great Britain withdrew her armies, and they continued their terrible devastation. The vicinity of the Ohio River, especially, was the scene of their operations.

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Wyandot and Shawnee Indian Lands

A Schedule embracing the names of Wyandot Indians of the Incompetent Class and Orphan Class under the Wyandot Treaty of January 31, 1855, the sales of whose lands, assigned and patented to them under said Treaty, have been confirmed by the Secretary of the Interior, upon a full examination of the report of Commissioners, Irwin and Cobb dated October 3rd 1870 and hearing of the parties interested in accordance with the 15th article of the treaty of February 23rd 1867, with certain Wyandot and other Indians in Kansas.

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Treaty of April 1, 1850

Articles of a convention concluded in the city of Washington, this first day of April, on thousand eight hundred and fifty, by and between Ardavan S. Loughery, commissioner especially appointed by the President of the United...

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Treaty of April 23, 1836

Articles of a treaty made and concluded between John A. Bryan, commissioner on the part of the United States, and William Walker, John Barnett, and Peacock, chiefs and principal men of the Wyandot tribe of Indians in Ohio,...

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Treaty of January 19, 1832

Articles of agreement and convention made and concluded at McCutcheonsville, Crawford county, Ohio, on the nineteenth day of January, 1832, by and between James B. Gardiner, specially appointed commissioner on the part of the...

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Treaty of July 22, 1814

A treaty of peace and friendship between the United States of America, and the tribes of Indians called the Wyandots, Delawares, Shawanoese, Senecas, and Miamies. The said United States of America, by William Henry Harrison,...

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