Topic: Winnebago

War Between the Colonies and The Western Indians – From 1763 To 1765

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A struggle began in 1760, in which the English had to contend with a more powerful Indian enemy than any they had yet encountered. Pontiac, a chief renowned both in America and Europe, as a brave and skillful warrior, and a far-sighted and active ruler, was at the head of all the Indian tribes on the great lakes. Among these were the Ottawas, Miamis, Chippewas, Wyandott, Pottawatomie, Winnebago, Shawanese, Ottagamie, and Mississagas. After the capture of Quebec, in 1760, Major Rodgers was sent into the country...

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Indian Treaties Waco to Yakima

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Treaties for all tribes listed below. Names in (parentheses) are other names used for tribe Waco, Walla Walla, Wasco, Wea, Winnebago, Witchetaw, Wyandot and Yakima Tribes Waco Treaties (Wacoe) Treaty of May 15, 1846 Walla-Walla Treaties Treaty of June 25, 1855 Treaty of June 9, 1855 Treaty of November 15, 1865 Wasco Treaties Treaty of June 25, 1855 Treaty of November 15, 1865 Wea Treaties Treaty of August 3, 1795 Treaty of June 7, 1803 Treaty of August 21, 1805 Treaty of September 30, 1809 Treaty of October 26, 1809 Treaty of June 4, 1816 Treaty of October 2, 1818 Treaty of August 11, 1820 Treaty of October 29, 1832 Treaty of May 30, 1854 Treaty of February 23, 1867 Winnebago Treaties Treaty of June 3, 1816 Treaty of August 19, 1825 Treaty of August 11, 1827 Treaty of August 25, 1828 Treaty of August 1, 1829 Treaty of September 15, 1832 Treaty of November 1, 1837 Treaty of October 13, 1846 Treaty of February 27, 1855 Treaty of April 15, 1859 Treaty of March 8, 1865 Witchetaw Treaties (Wichita, Wicheta, Ouichita) Treaty of August 24, 1835 Treaty of May 15, 1846 Wyandot Treaties (Wyandotte, Wiandot) Treaty of January 21, 1785 Treaty of January 9, 1789 Treaty of August 3, 1795 Treaty of August 7, 1803...

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Treaty of November 1, 1837

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of a treaty made at the city of Washington, between Carey A. Harris, thereto specially directed by the President of the United States, and the Winnebago nation of Indians, by their chiefs and delegates. Article I.The Winnebago nation of Indians cede to the United States all their land east of the Mississippi river. Article II.The said Indians further agree to relinquish the right to occupy, except for the purpose of hunting a portion of the land held by them west of the Mississippi, included between that river and a line drawn from a point twenty miles distant there from on the southern boundary of the neutral ground to a point, equidistant from the said river, on the northern boundary thereof. But this stipulation shall not be so construed, as to invalidate their title to the said tract. Article III.The said Indians agree to remove within eight months from the ratification of this treaty, to that portion of the neutral ground west of the Mississippi, which was conveyed to them in the second article of the treaty of September 15th, [21st] 1832, and the United States agree that the said Indians may hunt upon the western part of said neutral ground until they shall procure a permanent settlement. Article IV.In consideration of the cession and relinquishment...

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Treaty of September 15, 1832

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of a treaty made and concluded, at Fort Armstrong, Rock Island, Illinois, between the United States of America, by their Commissioners, Major General Winfield Scott of the United States’ Army, and his Excellency John Reynolds, Governor of the State of Illinois, and the Winnebago nation of Indians, represented in general Council by the undersigned Chiefs, Headmen, and Warriors. Article I.The Winnebago nation hereby cede to the United States, forever, all the lands, to which said nation have title or claim, lying to the south and east of the Wisconsin river, and the Fox river of Green Bay; bounded as follows, viz: beginning at the mouth of the Pee-keetol a-ka river; thence up Rock river to its source; thence, with a line dividing the Winnebago nation from other Indians east of the Winnebago lake, to the Grande Chûte; thence, up Fox river to the Winnebago lake, and with the northwestern shore of said lake, to the inlet of Fox river; thence, up said river to lake Puckaway, and with the eastern shore of the same to its most southeasterly bend; thence with the line of a purchase made of the Winnebago nation, by the treaty at Prairie du Chêne, the first day of August, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-nine, to the place of beginning. Article...

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Treaty of June 3, 1816

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A treaty of peace and friendship made and concluded between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and Auguste Chouteau, commissioners plenipotentiary of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said states, of the one part, and the undersigned chiefs and warriors of that portion of the Winnebago tribe or nation residing on the Ouisconsin river, of the other part. Whereas the undersigned chiefs and warriors, as well as that portion of the nation which they represent, have separated themselves from the rest of their nation, and reside in a village on the Ouisconsin river, and are desirous of returning to a state of friendly relations with the United States, the parties hereto have agreed to the following articles. Article I. Every injury or act of hostility, committed by one or either of the contracting parties against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot; and all the friendly relations that existed between them before the late war, shall be, and the same are hereby, renewed. Article II. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and those they represent, do by these presents, confirm to the United States all and every cession of land heretofore made by their nation to the British, French, or Spanish government, within the limits of the United States, or...

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Treaty of August 1, 1829

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of a treaty made and concluded at the Village of Prairie du Chien, Michigan Territory, on this first day of August, in the year one thousand eight hundred and twenty-nine, between the United States of America, by their Commissioner, General John M’Neil, Colonel Pierre Menard, and Caleb Atwater, Esq., for and on behalf of said States, of the one part, and the Nation of Winnebaygo Indians of the other part. Article I. The said Winnebaygo nation hereby, forever, cede and relinquish to the said United States, all their right, title, and claim, to the lands and country contained within the following limits and boundaries, to wit: beginning on Rock River, at the mouth of the Pee-kee-tau-no or Pee-kee-tol-a-ka, a branch thereof; thence, up the Pee-kee-tol-a-ka, to the mouth of Sugar Creek; thence, up the said creek, to the source of the Eastern branch thereof; thence, by a line running due North, to the road leading from the Eastern blue mound, by the most Northern of the four lakes, to the portage of the Wisconsin and Fox rivers; thence, along the said road, to the crossing of Duck Creek; thence, by a line running in a direct course to the most Southeasterly bend of Lake Puck-a-way, on Fox River; thence, up said Lake and Fox River,...

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Illinois Indian Land

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now With the rapid increase of a white population between the Lakes and the Mississippi, which followed the conclusion of hostilities with England and her Indian allies, new difficulties began to arise between the natives and the settlers. Illinois and Wisconsin were inhabited by various tribes of Indians, upon terms of bitter hostility among themselves, but united in their suspicions and apprehensions at the unprecedented inroads of emigrants from the east. The Winnebago, dwelling in Wisconsin; the Pottawatomie, situated around the southern extremity of Lake Michigan; and...

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Treaty of March 8, 1865

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of treaty made and concluded at Washington, D. C., between the United States of America, by their commissioners, Wm. P. Dole, C. W. Thompson, and St. A. D. Balcombe, and the Winnebago tribe of Indians, by their chiefs, Little Hill, Little Decoria, Whirling Thunder, Young Prophet, Good Thunder, and White Breast, on the 8th day of March, 1865. Article I.The Winnebago tribe of Indians hereby cede, sell, and convey to the United States all their right, title, and interest in and to their present reservation in the Territory of Dakota, at Usher’s Landing, on the Missouri River, the metes and bounds whereof being on file in the Indian Department. Article II.In consideration of the foregoing cession, and the valuable improvements thereon, the United States agree to set apart for the occupation and future home of the Winnebago Indians, forever, all that certain tract or parcel of land ceded to the United States by the Omaha tribe of Indians on the sixth day of March, A. D. 1865, situated in the Territory of Nebraska, and described as follows, viz: Commencing at a point on the Missouri River four miles due south from the north boundary-line of said reservation; thence west ten miles; thence south four miles; thence west to the western boundary-line of the reservation; thence...

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Treaty of April 15, 1859

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of agreement and convention made and concluded at Washington City on the fifteenth day of April, eighteen hundred and fifty-nine, by and between Charles E. Mix, commissioner on the part of the United States, and the following-named chiefs and delegates, representing the Winnebago tribes of Indians, viz: Baptiste Lassalleur Little Hill, Little De-Corie, Prophet, Wakon, Conohutta-kau, Big Bear, Rogue, Young Frenchman, One Horn, Yellow Banks, and O-o-kau, they being thereto duly authorized by said tribe. Article 1. The Winnebago Indians having now more lands than are necessary for their occupancy and use, and being desirous of promoting settled habits of industry and enterprise amongst themselves by abolishing the tenure in common by which they now hold their lands, and by assigning limited quantities thereof, in severalty, to the members of the tribe, including their half or mixed blood relatives now residing with them, to be cultivated and improved for their own individual use and benefit, it is hereby agreed and stipulated that the eastern portion of their present reservation, embracing townships one hundred and six, (106) and one hundred and seven, (107) range twenty-four (24) and one hundred and six (106) and one hundred and seven, (107) range twenty-five (25) and the two strips of land immediately adjoining them on the east and north, shall...

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Treaty of February 27, 1855

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of agreement and convention, made and concluded at Washington City on the twenty-seventh day of February, eighteen hundred and fifty-five, between George W. Manypenny, commissioner on the part of the United States, and the following-named chiefs and delegates representing the Winnebago tribe of Indians, viz: Waw-kon- chaw-koo-kaw, The Coming Thunder, or Kinnoshik; Sho-go-nik-kaw, or Little Hill; Maw-he-coo-shah-naw-zhe-kaw, One that Stands and Reaches the Skies, or Little Decorie; Waw-kon-chaw-hoo-no-kaw, or Little Thunder; Hoonk-hoo-no-kaw, Little Chief, or Little Priest; Honch-hutta-kaw, or Big Bear; Wach-ha-ta-kaw, or Big Canoe; Ha-zum-kee-kaw, or One Horn; Ha-zee-kaw, or Yellow Bank; and Baptiste Lassallier, they being thereto duly authorized by said tribe: Article 1. The Winnebago Indians hereby cede, sell, and convey to the United States all their right, title, and interest in, and to, the tract of land granted to them pursuant to the third article of the treaty concluded with said tribe, at Washington City, on the thirteenth day of October, one thousand eight hundred and forty-six, lying north of St. Peter’s River and west of the Mississippi River, in the Territory of Minnesota, and estimated to contain about eight hundred and ninety-seven thousand and nine hundred (897,900) acres; the boundary-lines of which are thus described, in the second article of the treaty concluded between the United States and the Chippewa...

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Treaty of October 13, 1846

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of a treaty made and concluded at the city of Washington, on the thirteenth day of October, in the year one thousand eight hundred and forty-six, between the United States, of the one part, by their commissioners, Albion K. Parris, John J. Abert, and T. P. Andrews, and the Winnebago tribe of Indians, of the other part, by a full delegation of said tribe, specially appointed by the chiefs, head-men, and warriors thereof. Article 1. It is solemnly agreed that the peace and friendship which exist between the people of the United States and the Winnebago Indians shall be perpetual; the said tribe of Indians giving assurance, hereby, of fidelity and friendship to the Government and people of the United States, and the United States giving to them, at the same time, promise of all proper care and parental protection. Article 2. The said tribe of Indians hereby agree to cede and sell, and do hereby cede and sell, to the United States, all right, title, interest, claim, and privilege, to all lands, wherever situated, now or heretofore occupied or claimed by said Indians, within the States and Territories of the United States, and especially to the country now occupied, inhabited, or in any way used by them, called the “neutral ground,” which tract of...

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Treaty of Nov. 1, 1837

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of a treaty made at the city of Washington, between Carey A. Harris, thereto specially directed by the President of the United States, and the Winnebago nation of Indians, by their chiefs and delegates. Article I.The Winnebago nation of Indians cede to the United States all their land east of the Mississippi river. Article II.The said Indians further agree to relinquish the right to occupy, except for the purpose of hunting a portion of the land held by them west of the Mississippi, included between that river and a line drawn from a point twenty miles distant there from on the southern boundary of the neutral ground to a point, equidistant from the said river, on the northern boundary thereof. But this stipulation shall not be so construed, as to invalidate their title to the said tract. Article III.The said Indians agree to remove within eight months from the ratification of this treaty, to that portion of the neutral ground west of the Mississippi, which was conveyed to them in the second article of the treaty of September 15th, [21st] 1832, and the United States agree that the said Indians may hunt upon the western part of said neutral ground until they shall procure a permanent settlement. Article IV.In consideration of the cession and relinquishment...

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Sac and Fox Reservation

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Report of Special Agent Reuben Sears on the Indians of the Sac and Fox tract or reservation, Sac and Fox agency, Tama County, Iowa. 2.5 miles from the town of Tama, September 1890. Names of Indian tribes or parts of tribes occupying said reservation: (a) Pottawatomie, Sac (Sauk) and Fox of the Mississippi, and Winnebago. The unallotted area of this tract is 1,258 acres, or 2 square miles. The tract has been surveyed and subdivided. It was established by purchase. (See act of Congress approved. March 2, 1867, 14 U. S. Stats, p. 507.) Deeds November 1870, and 1882 and 1883. Indian. population 1800: 397. Sac and Fox Reservation This reservation is one only in name, as the Sacs and Foxes own it in fee, the deed to the same being held in trust by the governor of Iowa. On this these Indians have lived surrounded by the whites for the last 30 years, and should now be in a fair state of civilization if white influence has much power in molding Indian character. In fact, this tribe shows but little civilized or Christianized results from such surroundings. Their physical condition is comparatively good; a few seem troubled with a cough and other evidences of chronic lung trouble, but then a majority give every indication of...

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