Topic: Wappinger

Wappinger Indian Divisions

Sub-tribes, bands and divisions of the Wappinger Tribe of Indians. Kitchawak Kitchawak (perhaps akin to Chippewa Kichŭchǐwǐnk ‘at the great niybtaub.’ (W. Jones). Apparently a band or small tribe, or, as Ruttenber designates it, a “chieftaincy” of the Wappinger confederacy, formerly residing on the east bank of the Hudson in what is now Westchester County, New York. Their territory is believed to have extended from Croton river to Anthony’s Nose.  Their principal village, Kitchawank, in 1650, appears to have been about the mouth of the Croton, though one authority 1N.Y. Doc. Col. Hist., xiii, 24, 2882 locates it at Sleepy Hollow.  They also had a village at Peekskill which they called Sackhoes.  Their fort, or “castle,” which stood at the mouth of Croton river, has been represented as one of the most formidable and ancient of the Indian fortresses south of the Highlands.  Its exact situation, according to Ruttenber, was at the neck of Teller’s, called Senasqua.  The Kitchawank were a party to the treaty of peace made with the Dutch, August 30, 1645. Mattabesec Mattabesec (from massa-seguēs-et, ‘at a [relatively] great rivulet or brook. Trumbull). An important Algonquian tribe of Connecticut, formerly occupying both banks of Connecticut river from Wethersfield to Middletown or to the coast and extending westward indefinitely. The Wongunk, Pyquaug, and Montowese Indians were a part of this tribe. According to Ruttenber they were a...

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From Poughkeepsie to Kingston along the Hudson River

Leaving the Poughkeepsie dock the steamer approaches the Poughkeepsie Bridge which, from Blue Point and miles below, has seemed to the traveler like a delicate bit of lace-work athwart the landscape, or like an old-fashioned “valance” which used to hang from Dutch bedsteads in the Hudson River farm houses. This great cantilever structure was begun in 1873, but abandoned for several years. The work was resumed in 1886 just in time to save the charter, and was finished by the Union Bridge Company in less than three years. The bridge is 12,608 feet in length (or about two miles and a half), the track being 212 feet above the water with 165 feet clear above the tide in the centre span. The breadth of the river at this point is 3,094 feet. The bridge originally cost over three million dollars and much more has been annually spent in necessary improvements. It not only affords a delightful passenger route between Philadelphia and Boston, but also brings the coal centers of Pennsylvania to the very threshold of New England. Two railroads from the east centre here, and what was once considered an idle dream, although bringing personal loss to many stockholders, has been of material advantage to the city. As the steamer passes under the bridge the traveler will see on the left Highland station (West Shore Railroad) and above this...

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