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Topic: Natural Disaster

The Johnstown Pennsylvania Flood

An in-depth history of the Johnstown Pennsylvania Flood, complete with many images, both drawn and photographed, maps, and videos depicting the horrors of the flood. – On May 28, 1889, a storm formed over Nebraska and Kansas, moving east. When the storm struck the Johnstown-South Fork area two days later it was the worst downpour that had ever been recorded in that section of the country. The US Signal Service estimated that 6 to 10 inches (150 to 250 mm) of rain fell in 24 hours over the entire section. During the night small creeks became roaring torrents ripping out trees and debris. Telegraph lines were downed and rail-lines were washed out. Before daybreak the Conemaugh River that ran through Johnstown was about to leave its banks…

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The Johnstown Flood by Charles Guggenheim

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Documentary Series by Charles Guggenheim on the Johnstown Flood. He received an Academy Award for his depiction and recreation of the 1889 flood. The film was released in 1989, commemorating the 100th year anniversary of the event. Using archival film and photographs, this film recreates the history of the Johnstown flood which killed 2,200 people in 1889. From the development of the South Fork Hunting & Fishing Club on Lake Conemaugh to the assessment of the dam by members of the club and a concerned citizen...

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Johnstown Flood Mosaic Gallery

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The following gallery represents over 60 sketches depicting the horrors of the flood. The wrecked houses burning at the Pennsylvania Railroad Bridge Carrying children to burial The militia at rest In the valley of death Interior of the morgue Carrying supplies over the river Nineveh Station, where two hundred bodies were found Timely Warning to Escape. Encampment of relief parties Relief for Johnstown – Pennsylvania Railroad Station, Philadelphia Child found thumping on a wrecked piano Clearing the Cambria Iron Works A father’s despair at the loss...

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The North Atlantic Tsunami

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Between 2007 and 2012 scholars became aware of several archives and geological records, which described a catastrophic tsunami in the North Atlantic in 1014 AD. The date is especially relevant to the study of the Track Rock terraces. Currently, the oldest radiocarbon date for an agricultural terrace at Track Rock is c. 1018 AD – which actually could be 30 years in either direction. Forensic geologist Dallas Abbott of the Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University has found evidence of a large meteor or comet strike in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean, which hurled extraterrestrial debris over 3800 km (2361 miles) to a bog in the Black Rock Forest in New York. The material was dated to around 1014 AD. Abbot also found debris from a meteor or comet strike in the Lesser Antilles in the Caribbean Basin that also dated to 1014 AD. It is likely that the damage wrought by this tsunami (or multiple tsunamis) was similar to the one in the Indian Ocean on December 26, 2004. The scale of this disaster would have had a major cultural impact on the indigenous peoples of the Americas. There are stone inscriptions of a great flood along the coast of Mexico and Central America in the early 11th century AD. It is possible...

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Silver City Owyhee Idaho Avalanche

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Their names were: Michael Jordan A. J. Miner G. W. Chadwick Cyrus Iba William Phipps Joseph Dorsey Jerome Francisco John Moore J. R. Cain W. Churchill H. R. Wade A. J. Reynolds James Carroll William Duncan Dr A. F. Rudd F. Height W. L. Wade John Gannon M. Conner C. Ward H. W. Prindall D. P. Banes O. H. Purdy J. G. Boone W. T. Carson P. H. Gordon L. G. Gehr and 3 others. In the Silver City Owyhee Avalanche of Jan. 8, 1876, is a notice of the death of Alexander Eddington, an Englishman aged 60, a ‘pioneer of Owyhee,’ who may have been of third party. In Ballou’s Adventures, MS., Jordan’s name is given as J. P. Jordan. H. K. Wade, who was the first treasurer-elect of Owyhee co., died in 1863. William Duncan died in 1873 or 1874 in Nevada. J. R. Cain settled in Boise Valley. F. Height and G. Iba settled in Utah. O. H. Purdy remained in Owyhee County, and wrote an account of these matters on the twelfth anniversary of the discovery of the Owyhee mines, in Owyhee Silver City Avalanche, May 22, 1875. Peter McQueen, ‘one of the pioneers of the Owyhee mines,’ was killed Jan. 26, 1864, by the caving in of a tunnel on which...

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Johnstown Flood Victims

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now List of dead and missing people in the Johnstown Pennsylvania Flood of 1889. To find out more information about this flood, view pictures and video, visit the main page: The Johnstown Pennsylvania Horror Last Name, First, Age(if known) Address Buried Abbreviations used in the list of dead and missing: GCG:German Catholic Cemetery (Geistown) GC-PL: Grandview Cemetery Private Lot GC-PP: Grandview Cemetery Public Plot-Bodies found but not recovered by family/friends GCS: German Catholic Cemetery (Sandyvale) LYC: Lower Yoder Catholic Cemetery Missing: Body Never Recovered NCR: No Cemetery...

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Millions of Money for Johnstown

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Never before in our country has there been such a magnificent exhibition of public sympathy and practical charity. As the occasion was the most urgent ever known, so the response has been the greatest. All classes have come to the rescue with a generosity, a thoughtfulness and heartfelt pity sufficient to convince the most stubborn misanthrope that religion is not dead and charity has not, like the fabled gods of Greece, forsaken the earth. The following lines, cut from one of our popular journals, aptly represents...

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A Day of Work and Worship

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Governor Beaver has assumed the command. He arrived in Johnstown yesterday, the 8th, and will take personal charge of the work of clearing the town and river. For that purpose $1,000,000 from the State Treasury will be made available immediately. This action means that the State will clear and clean the town. It was a day of prayer but not a day of rest in Johnstown. Faith and works went hand in hand. The flood-smitten people of the Conemaugh, though they met in the very path...

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A Walk Through the Valley of Death

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now In the following graphic narrative one of the eye-witnesses of the fearful ruin and slaughter represents himself as a guide, and if the reader will consider himself as the party whom the guide is conducting, a vivid impression of the scene of the great destruction may be obtained. “Hello, where on earth did you come from? And what are you doing here, anyhow? Oh! you just dropped in to see the sights, eh? Well, there are plenty of them and you won’t see the like of...

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One Week After the Great Disaster

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now By slow degrees and painful labor the barren place where Johnstown stood begins again to look a little like the habitations of a civilized community. Daily a little is added to the cleared space once filled with the concrete rubbish of this town, daily the number of willing workers who are helping the town to rise again increases. To-day the great yellow plain which was filled with the best business blocks and residences before the flood is covered with tents for soldiers and laborers and gangs...

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Stories of the Flood

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now War, death, cataclysm like this, America, Take deep to thy proud, prosperous heart. E’en as I chant, lo! out of death, and out of ooze and slime, The blossoms rapidly blooming, sympathy, help, love, From west and east, from south and north and over sea, Its hot spurr’d hearts and hands humanity to human aid moves on; And from within a thought and lesson yet. Thou ever-darting globe! thou Earth and Air! Thou waters that encompass us! Thou that in all the life and death of...

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Terrible Pictures of Woe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The proportion of the living registered since the flood as against the previous number of inhabitants is even less than was reported yesterday. It was ascertained to-day that many of the names on the list were entered more than once and that the total number of persons registered is not more than 13,000 out of a former population of between 40,000 and 50,000. A new and more exact method of determining the number of the lost was inaugurated this morning. Men are sent out by the...

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Hairbreadth Escapes

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now So vast is the field of destruction that to get an adequate idea from any point level with the town is simply impossible. It must be viewed from a height. From the top of Kernville Mountain just at the east of the town the whole strange panorama can be seen. Looking down from that height many strange things about the flood that appear inexplicable from below are perfectly plain. How so many houses happened to be so queerly twisted, for instance, as if the water had...

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Digging for the Dead

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A party started in early exploring the huge mass of débris banked against the Pennsylvania Railroad bridge. This collection, consisting of trees, sides of houses, timber and innumerable articles, varies in thickness from three or four feet to twenty feet. It is about four hundred yards long, and as wide as the river. There are thousands of tons in this vast pile. How many bodies are buried there it is impossible to say, but conservative estimates place it at one thousand at least. The corps of...

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Pathetic Scenes

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Some of the really pathetic scenes of the flood are just coming to the public ear. John Henderson, his wife, his three children, and the mother of Mrs. Henderson remained in their house until they were carried out by the flood, when they succeeded in getting upon some drift. Mr. Henderson took the babe from his wife, but the little thing soon succumbed to the cold and the child died in its father’s arms. He clung to it until it grew cold and stiff and then,...

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