Topic: Menominee

Narrative of the captivity of Alexander Henry, Esq – Indian Captivities

Narrative of the captivity of Alexander Henry, Esq., who, in the time of Pontiac’s War, fell into the hands of the Huron Indians. Detailing a faithful account of the capture of the Garrison of Michilimacki-Nac, and the massacre of about ninety people. Written by himself. 1Mr. Henry was an Indian trader in America for about sixteen years. He came to Canada with the army of General Amherst, and previous to his being made prisoner by the Indians experienced a variety of fortune. His narrative, as will be seen, is written with great candor as well as ability, and to the discriminating reader needs no encomium. He was living in Montreal in 1809, as appears from the date of his preface to his Travels, which he published in New York that year, with a dedication to Sir Joseph Banks. Ed. Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY INTL Start Now When I reached Michilimackinac I found several other traders, who had arrived before me, from different parts of the country, and...

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Treaty of October 18, 1848

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at Lake Pow-aw-hay-kon-nay, in the State of Wisconsin, on the eighteenth day of October, one thousand eight hundred and forty-eight, between the United States of America, by William Medill, a commissioner duly appointed for that purpose, and the Menomonee tribe of Indians, by the chiefs, headmen, and warriors of said tribe. Article I. It is stipulated and solemnly agreed that the peace and friendship now so happily subsisting between the Government and people of the United States and the Menomonee Indians shall be perpetual. Article II. The said Menomonee tribe of Indians agree to cede, and do hereby cede, sell, and relinquish to the United States all their lands in the State of Wisconsin, wherever situated. Article III. In consideration of the foregoing cession, the United States agree to give, and do hereby give, to said Indians for a home, to be held as Indians’ lands are held, all that country or tract of land ceded to the said United States by the Chippewa Indians of the Mississippi and Lake Superior, in the treaty of August 2, 1847, and the Pillager band of Chippewa Indians, in the treaty of August 21, 1847, which may not be assigned to be assigned to the Winnebago Indians, under the treaty with that tribe of October 13, 1846, and which is guarantied to contain not less...

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Treaty of March 30, 1817

A treaty of peace and friendship made and concluded at St. Louis by and between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and Auguste Chouteau, commissioners on the part and behalf of the United States of America, of the one part, and the undersigned chiefs and warriors, deputed by the Menomenee tribe or nation of Indians, on the part and behalf of their said tribe or nation, of the other part. The parties, being desirous of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe or nation, and of being placed in all things, and in every respect, on the same footing upon which they stood before the late war, have agreed to the following articles: Article I. Every injury, or act of hostility, by one or either of the contracting parties, against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot. Article II. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States and all the individuals composing the said Menomenee tribe or nation. Article III. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, on the part and behalf of their said tribe or nation, do, by these presents, confirm to the United States all and every cession of land heretofore made by their tribe or nation to the British, French, or Spanish, government, within the limits of the United States, or their territories; and also, all...

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Treaty of September 3, 1839

Articles of a treaty made at Stockbridge in the Territory of Wisconsin, on the third day of September in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty-nine, between the United States of America, by their commissioner Albert Gallup, and the Stockbridge and Munsee tribes of Indians, who reside upon Lake Winnebago in the territory of Wisconsin. Article I. The Stockbridge and Munsee tribes of Indians (formerly of New York) hereby cede and relinquish to the United States, the east half of the tract of forty-six thousand and eighty acres of land, which was laid off for their use, on the east side of Lake Winnebago, in pursuance of the treaty made by George B. Porter commissioner on the part of the United States, and the Menominee nation of Indians, on the twenty-seventh day of October eighteen hundred and thirty-two. The said east half hereby ceded, to contain twenty-three thousand and forty acres of land; to be of equal width at the north and south ends, and to be divided from the west half of said tract of forty-six thousand and eighty acres, by a line to be run parallel to the east line of said tract. The United States to pay therefore, one dollar per acre at the time and in the manner hereinafter provided. Article II. Whereas a portion of said tribes, according to a...

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Menominee Burial Customs

The Menomini (Menominee Tribe), whose home when first encountered by Europeans during the early years of the seventeenth century was west of Lake Michigan, evidently possessed many customs quite similar to those of the Ojibway. Their dead were usually deposited in excavated graves, but they also had some form of scaffold burial. “The Menomini formerly disposed of their dead by inclosing the bodies in long pieces of birchbark or in slats of wood, and burying them in a shallow hole. When not in the neighborhood of birch or other trees, from which broad pieces of bark could be obtained, some of the men would search for the nearest dugout, from which they would cut a piece long enough to contain the body. In some instances sections of hollow trees were used as coffins. In order to afford protection against wild beasts, there were placed over the grave three logs-two directly on the ground and the third on the others. They were prevented from rolling away by stakes driven into the earth. ” More modern customs now prevail with the greater body of the tribe, and those who have been Christianized adopt the following course: A wooden coffin is made and the body laid out in the ordinary manner. The burial takes place usually the day on which death occurs. The graves are about 4 feet deep. Over the mound...

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Treaty of May 12, 1854

Articles of agreement made and concluded at the Falls of Wolf River, in the State of Wisconsin, on the twelfth day of May, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-four, between the United States of America, by Francis Huebschmann, superintendent of Indian affairs, duly authorized thereto, and the Menomonee tribe of Indians, by the chiefs, headmen, and warriors of said tribe—such articles being supplementary and amendatory to the treaty made between the United States and said tribe on the eighteenth day of October, one thousand eight hundred and forty-eight. Whereas, among other provisions contained in the treaty in the caption mentioned, it is stipulated that for and in consideration of all the lands owned by the Menomonees, in the State of Wisconsin, wherever situated, the United States should give them all that country or tract of land ceded by the Chippewa Indians of the Mississippi and Lake Superior, in the treaty of the second of August, eighteen hundred and forty-seven, and by the Pillager band of Chippewa Indians in the treaty of the twenty-first of August, eighteen hundred and forty-seven, which had not been assigned to the Winnebagoes, guarantied not to contain less than six hundred thousand acres; should pay them forty thousand dollars for removing and subsisting themselves; should give them fifteen thousand dollars for the establishment of a manual-labor school, the erection of a grist and saw mill,...

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Treaty of February 8, 1831

Articles of agreement made and concluded at the City of Washington, this eighth day of February, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-one, between John H. Eaton, Secretary of War, and Samuel C. Stambaugh, Indian Agent at Green Bay, specially authorized by the President of the United States, and the undersigned chiefs and head men of the Menomonee nation of Indians, fully authorized and empowered by the said nation, to conclude and settle all matters provided for by this agreement. The Menomonee Tribe of Indians, by their delegates in council, this day, define the boundaries of their country as follows, to wit; On the east side of Green Bay, Fox river, and Winnebago lake; beginning at the south end of Winnebago lake; thence southeastwardly to the Milwauky or Manawauky river; thence down said river to its mouth at lake Michigan; thence north, along the shore of lake Michigan, to the mouth of Green Bay; thence up Green Bay, Fox river, and Winnebago lake, to the place of beginning. And on the west side of Fox river as follows: beginning at the mouth of Fox river, thence down the east shore of Green bay, and across its mouth, so as to include all the islands of the “Grand Traverse;” thence westerly, on the highlands between the lake Superior and Green bay, to the upper forks of the Menomonee river; thence to...

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Supplemental Treaty of February 17, 1831

Whereas certain articles of agreement were entered into and concluded at the city of Washington, on the 8th day of February instant, between the undersigned, Commissioners on behalf of the United States, and the chiefs and warriors, representing the Menomonee tribe of Indians, whereby a portion of the Menomonee country, on the northwest side of Fox river and Green bay, was ceded to the United States, for the benefit of the New York Indians, upon certain conditions and restrictions therein expressed: And whereas it has been represented to the parties to that agreement, who are parties hereto, that it would be more desirable and satisfactory to some of those interested that one or two immaterial changes be made in the first and sixth articles, so as not to limit the number of acres to one hundred for each soul who may be settled upon the land when the President apportions it, as also to make unlimited the time of removal and settlement upon these lands by the New York Indians, but to leave both these matters discretionary with the President of the United States. Now, therefore, as a proof of the sincerity of the professions made by the Menomonee Indians, when they declared themselves anxious to terminate in an amicable manner, their disputes with the New York Indians, and also as a further proof of their love and veneration...

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Treaty of October 27, 1832 – Menominee

Whereas articles of agreement between the United States of America, and the Menominee Indians, were made and concluded at the city of Washington, on the eighth day of February A. D. one thousand eight hundred and thirty-one, by John H. Eaton, and Samuel C. Stambaugh, Commissioners on the part of the United States, and certain Chiefs and Headmen of the Menominee Nation, on the part of said nation; to which articles, an addition or supplemental article was afterwards made, on the seventeenth day of February in the same year, by which the said Menominee Nation agree to cede to the United States certain parts of their land; and that a tract of country therein defined shall be set apart for the New York Indians. All which with the many other stipulations therein contained will more fully appear, by reference to the same. Which said agreements thus forming a Treaty, were laid before the Senate of the United States during their then session: but were not at said session acted on by that body. Whereupon a further agreement was on the fifteenth day of March, in the same year, entered into for the purpose of preserving the provisions of the treaty, made as aforesaid; by which it was stipulated that the said articles of agreement, concluded as aforesaid, should be laid before the next Senate of the United States, at...

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Treaty of September 3, 1836

Articles of agreement made and concluded at Cedar Point, on Fox river, near Green bay, in the Territory of Wisconsin, this third day of September in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty-six between Henry Dodge, Governor of said Territory of Wisconsin, commissioner on the part of the United States, on the one part; and the chiefs and head men of the Menomonie nation of Indians, of the other part. Article 1. The said Menomonie nation agree to cede to the United States, all of that tract or district of country included within the following boundaries, viz. Beginning at the mouth of Wolf river, and running up and along the same, to a point on the north branch of said river where it crosses the extreme north or rear line of the five hundred thousand acre tract heretofore granted to the New York Indians: thence following the line last mentioned, in a northeastwardly direction, three miles: thence in a northwardly course, to the upper forks of the Menomonie river, at a point to intersect the boundary line between the Menomonie and Chippewa nation of Indians: thence following the said boundary line last mentioned, in an eastwardly direction as defined and established by the treaty of the Little Bute des Mort, in 1827, to the Smooth rock or Shos-kin-aubie river: thence down the said river to...

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Menominee Indians

Menominee Indians were located on and near the Menominee River, Wisconsin, and in Michigan on or about the present location of Mackinac. The Menominee belonged to the Algonquian linguistic family and to the same section as the Cree and Foxes.

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Treaty of August 19, 1825

Treaty with the Sioux and Chippewa, Sacs and Fox, Menominie, Ioway, Winnebago, and a portion of the Ottawa, and Potawattomie Tribes. The United States of America have seen with much regret, that wars have for many years been carried on between the Sioux and the Chippewas, and more recently between the confederated tribes of Sacs and Foxes, and the Sioux; and also between the Ioways and Sioux; which, if not terminated, may extend to the other tribes, and involve the Indians upon the Missouri, the Mississippi, and the Lakes, in general hostilities. In order, therefore, to promote peace among these tribes, and to establish boundaries among them and the other tribes who live in their vicinity, and thereby to remove all causes of future difficulty, the United States have invited the Chippewa, Sac, and Fox, Menominie, Ioway, Sioux, Winnebago, and a portion of the Ottowa, Chippewa and Potawatomie Tribes of Indians living upon the Illinois, to assemble together, and in a spirit of mutual conciliation to accomplish these objects; and to aid therein, have appointed William Clark and Lewis Cass, Commissioners on their part, who have met the Chiefs, Warriors, and Representatives of the said tribes, and portion of tribes, at Prairie des Chiens, in the Territory of Michigan, and after full deliberation, the said tribes, and portions of tribes, have agreed with the United States, and with one...

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Menominee Indian Treaties

The Menominee have entered into the following treaties with the United States: (1) Treaty of peace at St Louis, Mo., Mar. 30, 1817; (2) Treaty of Prairie du Chien, Wis., Aug. 19, 1825, with the Menominee and other Indians, fixing boundary lines between the several tribes; (3) Treaty of Butte des Morts, Wis., Aug. 11, 1827, defining boundary lines between the Menominee, Chippewa, and Winnebago; (4) Treaty of Washington, Feb. 8, 1831, defining boundary lines and ceding lands to the United States, a portion of the latter to be for the use of certain New York Indians; (5) Treaty of Washington, Feb. 17, 1831, modifying the treaty of Feb. 8, 1831, in regard to the lands ceded for the use of the New York Indians; (6) Treaty of Washington, Oct. 27, 1832, in which certain modifications are made in regard to the lands ceded for the use of the New York Indians (Stockbridges and Munsee), and to certain boundary lines; (7) Articles of agreement made at Cedar Point, Wis., Sept. 3, 1836, ceding certain lands to the United States; (8) Treaty of Lake Pow-aw-hay-kon-nay, Oct. 18, 1848, ceding all their lands in Wisconsin, the United States to give them certain lands which had been ceded by the Chippewa; (9) Treaty at the Falls of Wolf r., May 12, 1854, by which they, ceded the reserve set apart by treaty...

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Menominee Tribe

Menominee Indians (meno, by change from mino, ‘good’, ‘beneficent’; min, a ‘grain’, ‘seed’, the Chippewa name of the wild rice. Hewitt. Full name Menominiwok ininiwok, the latter term signifying ‘they are men’). An Algonquian tribe, the members of which, according to Dr William Jones, claim to understand Sauk, Fox, and Kickapoo far more easily than they do Chippewa, Ottawa, and Potawatomi, hence it is possible that their linguistic relation is near to the former group of Algonquians. Grignon 1Grignon, Wis. Hist. Soc. Coll, iii, 265, 1857 peaks of the Noquet as a part of the Menominee, and states that...

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