Kan-hatki Tribe

The history of the Kan-hatki or Ikan-hatki (“White ground”) is parallel with that of the Fus-hatchee. They appear on the De Crenay map, in the lists of 1738, 1750, 1760, and 1761, and in those of Bartram, Swan, and Hawkins. 1MSS., Ayer Lib.; Hamilton, Col. Mobile, p. 190; Miss. Prov. Arch., I, p. 94; Ga. Col. Docs., VIII, p, 523; Bartram, Travels, p. 461; Schoolcraft, Ind. Tribes, v, p. 262; Ga. Hist Soc. Colls., III, p. 25. In 1761 their officially recognized traders were Crook & Co. Swan gives Kan-hatki as one of two towns occupied by Shawnee refugees, but this statement was probably due to the presence of some¬†Shawnee from the neighboring settlement of Sawanogi. In September, 1797, Hawkins states that the trader here was a man named Copinger. 2Ga. Hist. Soc. Colls., IX, pp. 168, 195. He gives the following account of the town: Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY INTL Start Now E-cim-hut-ke; from e-cim-na, earth, and hut-ke, white, called by the traders white ground. This...

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