Topic: Arosaguntacook

Narrative of the Captivity of Mrs. Isabella M’coy – Indian Captivities

Narrative of the Captivity of Mrs. Isabella M’coy, who was taken Captive at Epsom, N. H., in the Year 1747. Collected From the Recollections of Aged People who knew her, by the Rev. Jonathan Curtis, a Minister of that Town, about Seventeen Years ago, and by Him Communicated to the Publishers of the New Hampshire Historical Collections. Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY INTL Start Now The Indians were first attracted to the new settlements in the town of Epsom, N. H., by discovering M’Coy at Suncook, now Pembroke. This, as nearly as can be ascertained, was in the year 1747. Reports were spread of the depredations of the Indians in various places; and M’Coy had heard that they had been seen lurking about the woods at Penacook, now Concord. He went as far as Pembroke; ascertained that they were in the vicinity; was somewhere discovered by them, and followed home. They told his wife, whom they afterwards made prisoner, that they looked through cracks around the house, and...

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Arosaguntacook Tribe

Arosaguntacook Indians: A tribe of the Abnaki confederacy, formerly living in Androscoggin County, Maine. Their village, which bore the same name, was on Androscoggin River, probably near Lewiston. The various names used indiscriminately for the tribe and the river may be resolved into the forms Ammoscoggin and Arosaguntacook, which have received different interpretations, all seeming to refer to the presence of fish in the stream . The name seems to have been used only for the part of the river in Androscoggin County between the falls near Jay and those near Lewiston. The present name was obtained by changing the first part of the word to Andros in compliment to Gov. Andros. The Arosaguntacook lived on the edge of the first English settlements in Maine, and consequently suffered much in the various Indian wars, in which they took a prominent part from 1675 until their removal to Canada. Their town was burned by the English in 1690. As the settlements pushed into the interior the Wawenoc, at the mouth of the river, moved up and joined the Arosaguntacook, and at a later period the combined tribes moved still farther up and joined the Rocameca. These movements led to much confusion in the statements of writers, as the united tribes were commonly known by the name of the leading one, the Arosaguntacook or Androscoggin. These tribes, together with the Pigwacket,...

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