Surname: Ware

Hawes Family of Wrentham, MA

For generations, since the early Colonial period, the Hawes family has been resident in Wrentham, Mass. The line is traced back to Edward Hawes, of Dedham, Mass., born probably about 1620, who died in 1686. He married April 15, 1648, Eliony Lombard. This genealogy discusses the line from Edward through Oliver Snow Hawes who removed to Fall River Mass. It then discusses the family and descendants of Olvier Snow Hawes who resided in the vicinity of Fall River.

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Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

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Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

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Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. David A. Ware

Nancy (Martin) Rogers was born in the Saline District in 1848; married in 1869, David A. Ware. Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY INTL Start Now She is the mother of Bertha born in 1875, Martha born in 1877 and Thomas Rogers. Thomas L. Rogers was the first judge of the Osages. Mrs. Ware is a member of the Christian church and a ceaseless welfare...

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Biographical Sketch of Eugene F. Ware

Eugene F. Ware, a soldier of Iowa, a lawyer and public man of Kansas, and an author both of that state and Missouri, was born at Hartford, Connecticut, May 29, 1841. His parents moved to Burlington, Iowa, in his childhood and he was educated in the public schools of that place. During the Civil war he reached the rank of captain in the Fourth Iowa Cavalry. He took a section of land in Cherokee County, Kansas, in 1867, studied law and was admitted to the bar at Fort Scott and to the United States Supreme Court; entered the law firm of McComas & McKeighan at Fort Scott; in 1874 married Miss Jeanette P. Huntington of Rochester, New York, and was for many years editor of the Fort Scott Monitor. His political career consisted of two terms in the Kansas Legislature, 1879 to 1883, and three years as United States pension commissioner– 1902 to 1905. He was prominent in the republican party; was a delegate to two of its national conventions; was a member of the Sons of the American Revolution, the Bar Association, the Loyal Legion and the Society of the Mayflower Descendants. His home for some years was at Topeka, from which place he moved to Kansas City, Kansas, about 1909 where he practiced law in partnership with his son until the spring of 1911 when both retired...

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Biography of Spencer Hugh Ware

SPENCER HUGH WARE. Efficient, capable and trustworthy would be the verdict passed upon the character and official standing of our subject by any one in Shannon County to whom the question might be asked. Spencer Hugh Ware, circuit clerk and recorder of this county, is a most ardent Democrat, and most loyally stands by and works for the nominees of his party. He is a native Missourian, born in Licking, February 10, 1851. The son of Henry and Martha (Mitchell) Ware, natives of Maryland and White County, Tennessee, respectively, the father born in the year 181I. Henry Ware left his native State when a young man and went to Georgia, where he remained a short time. From there he went to Memphis, Tennessee, thence to St. Louis, Missouri, and about 1836 came to Licking, Texas County, Missouri, where he died in 1854. He was a blacksmith by trade, but after going to Licking, Missouri, turned his attention to selling goods and farming. Mrs. Ware is now living at Salem, this State. The original of this notice was but three years of age when his father died, and he grew to manhood in Salem, Dent County. When grown he attended college at Alton, Illinois, afterward Rochester, New York, and finished at Columbia, this State. When but a lad he had medicine in view, but gave that up for law, and...

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Slave Narrative of Emma Barr

Interviewer: Miss Irene Robertson Person Interviewed: Emma Barr Location: Madison, Arkansas Age: 65 Occupation: Nursed, Farmed “My parents belong to two people. Mama was born in Mississippi I think and papa come from North Carolina. Papa’s master was Lark Hickerson. Mama was sold from Dr. Ware to Dr. Pope. She was grown when she was sold. She was the mother of twenty-seven children. She had twins three times. “During the Civil War she was run from the Yankees and had twins on the road. They died or was born dead and she nearly died. They was buried between twin trees close to Hernando, Mississippi. Her last owner was Dr. Pope, ten miles south of Augusta, Arkansas. I was born there and raised up three miles south of Augusta, Arkansas. “When mama was sold she left her people in Mississippi but after freedom her sisters, Aunt Mariah and Aunt Mary, come here to mama. Aunt Mariah had no children. Aunt Mary had four boys, two girls. She brought her children. Mama said her husband when Dr. Ware owned her was Maxwell but she married my papa after Dr. Pope bought her. “Dr. Ware had a fine man he bred his colored house women to. They didn’t plough and do heavy work. He was hostler, looked after the stock and got in wood. The women hated him, and the men on...

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Slave Narrative of Beatrice Black

Interviewer: Irene Robertson Person Interviewed: Beatrice Black Age: 48 Location: Biscoe, Arkansas Occupation: Store and “eating joint” “I was born below the city pump here in Biscoe. My husband is a twin and the youngest of thirteen children. His twin brother is living. They are fifty years old today (August 6, 1938). His mother lived back and forth with the twins. She died year before last. She was so good. She was sure good to me. She helped me raise my three children. I misses her till this very day. Her name was Dedonia Black when she died. “She said master brought her, her father and mother and two sisters, Martha and Ida, from Brownsville, Tennessee at the commencement of the old war to Memphis in a covered ox wagon, and from there on a ship to Cavalry Depot at De Valla Bluff. They was all sold. Her father was sold and had to go to Texas. Her mother was sold and had to go back to Tennessee, and the girls all sold in Arkansas. Master Mann bought my mother-in-law (Dedonia). She was eighteen years old. They sold them off on Cavalry Depot where the ship landed. They put her up to stand on a barrel and auctioned them off at public auction. “Her father got with the soldiers in Texas and went to war. He enlisted and when...

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Biography of M. C. Ware

Among the leading farmers and stockmen of Washington county is numbered M. C. Ware, who resides on a well improved and valuable ranch near Bartlesville and is recognized as one of the large landholders and substantial citizens of his community. He was born in Collin county, Texas, October 11, 1857, his parents being James and Nancy (Howe) Ware, who became pioneer settlers of the Lone Star state, residing in the home in which their son M. C. was born, until called to their final rest. The father, a native of Arkansas, passed away in 1904. The mother’s demise occurred in 1903. In 1890 M. C. Ware came to Indian Territory, acquiring a tract of land five miles south of Pawhuska, on which he engaged in farming and stock raising until 1908, when he took up his residence on his present place, four tunes west of Bartlesville, on the Pawhuska road. After living for four years on this property he returned to his farm near Pawhuska, which comprises eight hundred acres of rich and arable land, but at the end of three years he moved back to his ranch near Bartlesville. This is a highly developed tract of thirteen hundred and eighty acres, on which he raises Kaffir corn, oats and sugar cane, while he also devotes considerable attention to the breeding of cattle, having at present three hundred head....

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Biographies of the Cherokee Indians

Whatever may be their origins in antiquity, the Cherokees are generally thought to be a Southeastern tribe, with roots in Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee, among other states, though many Cherokees are identified today with Oklahoma, to which they had been forcibly removed by treaty in the 1830s, or with the lands of the Eastern Band of Cherokees in western North Carolina. The largest of the so-called Five Civilized Tribes, which also included Choctaws, Chickasaws, Creeks, and Seminoles, the Cherokees were the first tribe to have a written language, and by 1820 they had even adopted a form of...

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Biographical Sketch of Charles William Ware

CHARLES WILLIAM WARE is a native of Christian County, Ky., and was born November 16, 1826. In 1827 he removed with his parents to Todd County, where he grew to manhood and has since that time had his residence; he is the son of Edmund Ware, who was born in Franklin County, Ky., in 1799, and removed to Christian County about 1820; he was married in 1824, to Miss Louisa V., daughter of Nicholas M. and Sarah T. (Bullock) Anderson, of Todd County, and from this union sprang: Sarah J. (Runyon), Charles William, Mary A. (Edmunds), Jasper A., Susan B. (Runyon), Martha G. (Dickinson), Nicholas M., and Louisa E. (Garth). Charles W. Ware was united in marriage October 9, 1861, to Miss Elizabeth V., daughter of William A. and Elizabeth B. (Saffarans) Garth, of Todd County, Ky., and this union was blessed with five children, all living, viz.: William M., born July 23, 1862; Charlie B. (Walton), June 22, 1864; Lizzie V., August 14, 1867; Edmund, February 24, 1870, and Charles Walter, March 7, 1875. Mr. Ware was reared to the mercantile business, but for the last twenty-five years has pursued the vocation of a farmer, in which he has been very successful, owning at present 800 acres of very valuable and productive land, well improved; his residence, which is near the Trenton depot, is doubtless one of the...

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