Surname: Silver

Migration of Families out of Norwich VT

At the first enumeration of the inhabitants of eastern Vermont, as made by the authority of New York in 1771, Norwich was found to be the most populous of all the towns of Windsor County, having forty families and 206 inhabitants. Windsor followed with 203, and Hartford was third with 190. The aggregate population of the county (ten towns reported) was then but 1,205, mostly confined to the first and second tiers of towns west of the Connecticut River. Twenty years later, in 1791, Hartland led all the towns of the county with 1,652 inhabitants, Woodstock and Windsor coming next with 1,605 and 1,542 respectively. Exceptional causes made the little town of Guilford (now numbering scarcely more than one thousand inhabitants), till after the year 1800, the most populous town in the state. In Norwich, the great falling off in the size of families in recent years is seen in the fact, that in the year 1800, the number of children of school age was 604, out of a total population of 1,486, while in 1880 with a nearly equal population (1,471) it was but 390. In the removal of large numbers of the native-born inhabitants by emigration, we must find the principal cause of the decline of our rural population. Preeminently is this true of Norwich. The outflow of people began very early and now for more than...

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Norwich Vermont in the Civil War

During the four years of war for the suppression of the Rebellion, Norwich furnished 178 different men for the armies of the Union. There were seven re-enlistments, making the whole number of soldiers credited to the town 185. By the census of 1860, the number of inhabitants was 1759. It appears, therefore, that the town sent to the seat of war rather more than one in ten of its entire population, during the four years’ continuance of hostilities. About the same proportion holds good for the state at large, Vermont contributing, out of an aggregate population of 315,116, soldiers to the number of 34,555 for the defense of the Union. Of the 178 men enlisting from Norwich, twenty-seven laid down their young lives in the service of the country. The soil of every southern state, from the Potomac to the Rio Grande, was moistened by the blood or supplied a grave to one or more of these. The town paid the larger part of these men liberal bounties, amounting to about $32,000, in addition to their state and government pay. All calls for men upon the town by the national authorities were promptly and fully met. The patriotic response of our people to the expenses and sacrifices of the war was, in general, hearty and emphatic; and yet candor and the truth of history compels us to confess that...

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Biography of Edmund Silver

Edmund Silver, a thriving farmer of Boscawen, N.H., was born in Bow, this State, September 10, 1834. His parents, Edmund and Sallie (Dow) Silver, who resided in Bow for the greater part of their lives, died when their son Edmund was quite young. They had nine children-Lewis, Laura, Cyrene, Leonard, Gideon, Sullivan, Daniel, Edmund, and George. Lewis died in March, 1897. Daniel is engaged in farming in Salisbury, N.H. George is in Penacook; and the others, except Edmund, the subject of our sketch, are deceased. Edmund Silver received his education in the district schools, remaining at home with his parents until he was seven years of age. He then went to Ware, Mass., where he was employed on a farm; and he was similarly engaged in other towns for a few years, returning subsequently to Bow. At the age of twenty he went to Canterbury, remaining there three and a half years. He then spent three years in Warner, N.H., afterward removing to Webster, in which place he was engaged in farming for about thirty-five years. Subsequently, coming to Boscawen, he purchased his present farm, then known as the Ferrin farm. It contains about sixty-five acres, most of which is under cultivation. Besides general farming he carries on a milk business. He also owns the farm at Webster where he formerly lived, which contains forty-five acres. On November 2,...

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Silver, Nathaniel Weldon – Obituary

Nathaniel Weldon Silver, of Wallowa, a retired planerman and edgerman, passed away Monday, November 11, 1963 at Wallowa Memorial Hospital where he had been a patient for two weeks. He had been in failing health for the two past years and bedfast for seven months. He was the son of Samuel M. and Amanda E. Silver, early pioneers of Wallowa county, and was born August 20, 1881 at Burnsville, North Carolina. He had lived in Wallowa county for the past seventy years. For many years he was employed at Bowman-Hicks Lumber Company and J. Herbert Bates mill. On December 25, 1904 he was married at Bartlett to Leila Josephine Smith who survives him. He was a member of the Christian church. He is survived by two sons: Jake and Ralph of Wallowa; three daughters: Mrs. Matt (Bessie) Nelson, of Los Angeles, Calif., Mrs. E.V. (Effie) Lewis of La Grande, and Mrs. Ira (Lois) Rhodes, of Wallowa; one sister, Mrs. Joe (Bessie) Friddles of Troy; nine grandchildren and eleven great-grandchildren. Funeral services were conducted yesterday (Wednesday) at 2 p.m. by the Bollman Funeral home from the Wallowa Christian Church, with Rev. Frank Needles officiating. Mrs. Don Scott was organist and soloist, and sang “The Old Rugged Cross” and “Shall We Gather At The River.” Casket bearers were: E.J. Hook, W.G. Collins, Verdo Baird, Roland McCrae, Fred Gray, and Marion McCrae....

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Biography of David A. Silver

David A. Silver is one of the men who claim Champaign County as their birthplace and the scene of their substantial activities. Mr. Silver has found in farming both a congenial and profitable occupation. The management of well tilled fields, the care and superintendence of good stock, the task of winning a living and at the same time increasing and improving the value of his farm, and the duties of good citizenship, have occupied him for many years. His home and farm are in Philo Township in section 3, and his mail is delivered on Rural Route No. 11 out of Urbana. Mr. Silver was born in Philo Township, September 22, 1867, and is a son of Wallace and Mary D. (Karr) Silver. His father was born in Warren County, Ohio, and his mother in New Jersey. Wallace Silver arrived in Champaign County October 23, 1854. He had come overland from Ohio, bringing household goods, and cattle. Locating in Philo Township, he bought in 1855 eighty acres in section 3, and proceeded forthwith to its development and improvement and followed farming successfully there until the last twelve years of his life, which he spent retired in Urbana. He died June 10, 1914, and his widow is still living in Urbana. The only child of his parents, David A. Silver grew up on the home farm, attended the local schools,...

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Biography of Andrew J. Silver

Andrew J. Silver, senior partner in the firm of Silver & Hall, Gossville, and an ex-member of the New Hampshire legislature, was born in Deerfield, N.H., May 9, 1835, son of Joseph M. and Sarah S. (Chase) Silver. The latter, natives respectively of Haverhill, Mass., and Deerfield, were both born in the year 1800. Joseph M. Silver moved to Deerfield when quite young and learned the carpenter’s trade. The active portion of his life was devoted to that calling. He owned a good farm, which he also cultivated with success, and lived to the age of eighty-eight years. In politics he acted with the Republican party. His wife, Sarah, who was a daughter of Nathan Chase, of Deerfield, became the mother of seven children, of whom there are living: Abbie C., John W., Andrew J., Horace C., and Charles W. Abbie C. is the wife of C. W. Prescott, of Raymond, N.H. John W. married Hattie Chase, of Chester, N.H.; and his children are: Walter H. and Charles P. Horace C. first married Mary E. Brown, and subsequently Mrs. Josephine White, a native of Tilton, and the widow of Charles H. White. Neither wife is now living. Charles W. married Abbie Arlin, of Manchester, N.H. Mrs. Joseph M. Silver died at the age of eighty-two. She and her husband were members of the Congregational church. Andrew J. Silver completed...

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