Surname: Pratt

1899 Directory for Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts

Resident and business directory of Middleboro’ and Lakeville, Massachusetts, for 1899. Containing a complete resident, street and business directory, town officers, schools, societies, churches, post offices, notable events in American history, etc. Compiled and published by A. E. Foss & Co., Needham, Massachusetts. The following is an example of what you will find within the images of the directory: Sheedy John, laborer, bds. J. G. Norris’, 35 West Sheehan John B., grocery and variety store, 38 West, h. do. Sheehan Lizzie O., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Lucy G. B., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East...

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Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

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The Winchester Star 1901-1951

The Winchester Star is the paper of record for the town of Winchester, Massachusetts and was a weekly publication, coming out on Friday of each week. These files presently contain digital images of the Star from January 4, 1901 through December 26, 1947 (more to come). The Winchester Star liked to publish items of an historical nature, from biographies of leading citizens (past and present) to items of history in reference to events which occurred in the past in Winchester. The publisher also filled his pages with photographs, and it’s possible that you may find your Winchester ancestors photo within it’s pages, albeit, a paper photograph, while not ideal, may be the only likeness you have for an ancestor.

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Cook Family of Norwich Vermont

Three brothers, Samuel, Francis, and Lyman, with their two sisters, (children of Jonathan and Lydia [Aldrich] Cook), ran away from the Shaker settlement at Lancaster, Mass., where they had been placed by their parents before 1800, and came to this vicinity at an early day. Samuel settled in Norwich, and married Anna Pratt, by whom he had nine children. From Samuel the later generations of Cooks in town were descended. Francis also located in Norwich, on the farm now occupied by David Sargent, and there he lived and died. He was never married. Lyman Cook settled in Thetford. Another brother, Washington Cook, settled in New York State, and himself and his son were made prisoners by the Indians, and taken to Canada, but were subsequently released from captivity. Seventeen acres of the farm where Samuel Cook located were bought by him at auction when they were sold for taxes, and fifty acres were purchased at private sale from Stephen Percival. Leonard Cook, son of Samuel, died at Norwich, on the paternal acres, May 13, 1886, aged seventy-seven years. He was the last surviving child of his parents’ nine children, all of whom lived to have children of their own, sixty, all told. Mr. Cook‘s son, Royal E., now resides in Norwich Village, having removed from the ancestral home several years since, leaving it in the possession of his son,...

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History of the Methodist Church at Norwich Vermont

Prior to the year 1800, Methodism had scarcely gained a foothold in Vermont. The first Methodist society in the State is said to have been formed at Vershire by Nicholas Suethen in 1796. Two years later, only one hundred church members were returned as residents in the Vershire Circuit, then including the whole of eastern Vermont. Zadock Thompson, in the first edition of his Gazetteer of Vermont, published in 1824, gives the number of preachers, traveling and local, at that time as about one hundred, and the number of societies much greater. Probably no religious body ever made so...

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Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How

A Narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How, who was taken by the Indians at the Great Meadow Fort above Fort Dummer, where he was an inhabitant, October 11th, 1745. Giving an account of what he met with in his traveling to Canada, and while he was in prison there. Together with an account of Mr. How’s death at Canada. Exceedingly valuable for the many items of exact intelligence therein recorded, relative to so many of the present inhabitants of New England, through those friends who endured the hardships of captivity in the mountain deserts and the damps of loathsome prisons. Had the author lived to have returned, and published his narrative himself, he doubtless would have made it far more valuable, but he was cut off while a prisoner, by the prison fever, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, after a captivity of one year, seven months, and fifteen days. He died May 25th, 1747, in the hospital at Quebec, after a sickness of about ten days. He was a husband and father, and greatly beloved by all who knew him.

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1867 Plymouth County Massachusetts Directory, Oil and Candle Manufacturers to Pump Makers

Oil and Candle Manufacturers  Judd L. S., Marion Organ Manufacturers Reynolds P., N. Bridgewater Marston A. B. Campello, Bridgewater Oysters and Refreshments (See Eating Houses) Nash J. E. Abington Douglas W. East Abington Gilman A. N., Bridgewater Fuller John, Bridgewater Hull J. C., Bridgewater Tripp B. F., Middleboro Union Saloon, Middleboro Grover R. B., No. Bridgewater Washburn and Richardson, No. Bridgewater Ballard S. D., Plymouth Dodge J. E., Plymouth Painters Carriage  Peirce Wm. M., Abington Ford B. F. East Abington Bates Asa, South Abington Hersey David A. Hingham Sprague Joseph T., Hingham Eldridge David, Kingston Boomer B. L., Middleboro Southworth Rodney E., Middleboro Sparrow J. G., North Bridge water Jones John B., North Bridge water Sargent Samuel, Bridge water Thomas William E., Bridge water Jones Charles L., Plymouth Young Charles, Scituate Young Edw., Scituate Painters (House and Sign) Davis W. H.. Abington French Joseph, Abington Ford B. F., East Abington Gilson L. C., East Abington Lawrence Thomas R., East Abington Lincoln S. B., North Abington Harding J. S., South Abington Beed Philip, South Abington Alden James S., Bridgewater Braman H. F. & J. G., Bridgewater Chandler Alden, Duxbury Hathaway Joshua W., Duxbury Sampson Alfred, Duxbury Grow & Wentworth, East Bridgewater Bonney E. P., Halifax Cook John, Halifax Bailey Melzer, Hanover Bryant Snow, Hanover Corbin Frank, Hanover Eells John P., Hanover Sturtevant George, Hanover Roberts John C., Hanson Cobb David, Hingham Cross and...

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Biography of Rev. John G. Pratt

Rev. John G. Pratt, one of the most widely known Protestant missionaries of Kansas and the West, was born in Hingham, Massachusetts in 1814 and graduated from Andover Seminary in the fall of 1836. He was immediately licensed to preach and the Baptist Suciety sent him to the Indian country to labor among the Shawnees. He continued that work for seven years, and in the fall of 1844 located four miles south of Fort Leavenworth to take charge of a contemplated mission of Green Bay Indians, lately arrived from Wisconsin. But they did not receive the promised allotment of land, and the mission was never organized. Mr. Pratt then chose a location near White Church, Wyandotte County, Kansas, for mission work among the Delawares, taking charge of a boarding school for the Indians which was built and owned by the American Baptist Foreign Mission Society. As a result of these labors Mr. Pratt became convineed that the Indian when taken young is as bright and apt as the average white child of the same age. The Delawares, especially, showed their appreciation of his work by their request that the Government set aside from their annuities for educational purposes an amount equal to $25 per year per pupil. In this quito famous school were taught English elementary branches, with algebra, natural philosophy and some of the academic studies. From 1864...

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Biographical Sketch of David Pratt

David Pratt, from Salem, Mass., came to Bridport in 1777, and located upon the farm now owned by Mrs. Edrick Spaulding. He was a carpenter by trade and built most of the early frame buildings in the town. He served as lister in 1800 and has many descendants in...

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Biographical Sketch of Jeremiah Pratt

Jeremiah Pratt, a native of Massachusetts, was an early settler in Winchester, N. H., married Sarah, daughter of Robert Newton, and reared seven children. Jeremiah, Jr., married Lucy, daughter of William and Lucy Richford, and had born to him nine children, five of whom are living. Robert W., the youngest son of Jeremiah, Jr., married Ruby W., daughter of Jacob and Ruby (Prindall) Moody, of Northfield, Mass., and resides in Keene, on Washington street. Their children are Mrs. Hattie E. Parks, Mrs. Abbie A. Conan, and Charles...

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Biography of David B. Pratt

DAVID B. PRATT. The name mentioned above is well known in the agricultural districts of Douglas County, Missouri, and is a synonym for all that is pushing, enterprising and successful. Mr. Pratt was born in Maury County, Tennessee, September 10, 1828, a son of Joseph and Mary (Buchanan) Pratt, the former of whom was born in Georgia, but when a young man removed to Tennessee, where he spent the remainder of his days. He was a cabinet maker by trade, was a soldier of the War of 1812, and was an upright and honorable man. His wife was born in Tennessee and was a daughter of David Buchanan, who was a participant in a number of the early Indian wars in Tennessee. She died in 1870, having become the mother of six children: Andrew J., who was killed in the battle of Monterey during the Mexican War; Margaret, who died after her marriage with H. S. Blakemore; David B.; and Fidelia A., who is the wife of G. W. Reese, of Tennessee, being the only ones who reached maturity. The early life of David B. Pratt was passed on a farm and his advantages for obtaining an education were very meager indeed. In 1849 he began farming on his own responsibility, but in 1850 was severely attacked by the “gold fever ” and he made the overland trip to...

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Biography of Walter R. Pratt

Walter R. Pratt. In 1899 Mr. Pratt established himself in business in the City of Independence, Montgomery County, and he had not only continued as one of the representative factors in the business activities of this community, but had also so shown his civic loyalty and progressiveness as to be called upon to serve as mayor of the city, of which office he was the incumbent one term and in which he gave a most effective administration. Mr. Pratt is of Scotch and English lineage and the first representatives of the family in America settled in Virginia, in the colonial era of our national history. Mr. Pratt was born at Madisonville, judicial center of Hopkins County, Kentucky, on the 16th of May, 1871, and is a son of Judge Clifton J. Pratt, who was born in Woodford County, Illinois, in 1845, but who was reared to manhood at Hopkinsville, Kentucky, to which state his parents returned after a comparatively brief pioneer experience in Illinois. At Madisonville, Kentucky, was solemnized the marriage of Judge Pratt to Miss Sallie M. Waddill, who was born at that place in 1852, and there they still maintain their home. Judge Pratt had long been numbered among the representative lawyers and influcntial citizens of Hopkins County, Kentucky, and had been called upon to serve in various offices of distinctive public trust. He represented his distriet...

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Biographical Sketch of Thomas Pratt

Thomas Pratt, of Culpepper County, Virginia, married a Miss Smith, by whom he had Thomas B., Elizabeth, and Ann. His first wife died, and he was married the second time to Martha Terrell, by whom he had Jonathan, Milton W., Lucinda, Mary, and Martha. Mr. Pratt settled in Warren County in 1831, with all of his children except Thomas B., and most of them now reside in that...

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