Surname: Morrison

In Possession Of The “Promised Land”

Monday, Nov. 22, 1819.–This day breakfasted with Mr. R. Morrison and dined with Mr. W. Morrison. These gentlemen are wealthy and live in very comfortable style. Mrs. R. Morrison is one of the most intelligent women that I have conversed with, and possesses a lady’s privilege, while Mrs. W. Morrison might rank, in point of beauty with some of the belles of Philadelphia. Dr. Hill having accomplished his business, we set out from Kaskia at 2 o’clock, after bidding a friendly farewell to many new friends made in this place. I must confess I found a few possessing so much more merit than I anticipated that I parted with them reluctantly. Traveled twelve miles, and arrived at Mme. LeCount’s. We supped with a tableful of French. Not one of them could speak English. Pumpkins, spoiled venison and rancid, oily butter for supper, added to the odor of a few ‘coons and opossums that were ripening in the sun, induced us to cut our comfort short. During the night I was taken ill with rheumatism. Bled myself largely. Set out at 6 o’clock in the morning rather better, though dull. Passed some small lakes full of ducks and geese. Saw seven deer, some wild turkeys and other game. Retraced our former steps. Passed Cahokia, a small and unimproving village, and arrived at the town of Illinois at 7 o’clock p....

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Slave Narrative of George Morrison

Interviewer: Iris Cook Person Interviewed: George Morrison Location: New Albany, Indiana Place of Residence: 25 East 5t., New Albany, Indiana Place of Birth: Union County, Kentucky Iris Cook District 4 Floyd County STORY OF GEORGE MORRISON 25 East 5th St., New Albany, Ind. Observation of the writer (This old negro, known as “Uncle George” by the neighbors, is very particular about propriety. He allows no woman in his house unless accompanied by a man. He says “It jest a’nt the proper thing to do”, but he came to a neighbors for a little talk.) “I was bawn in Union County, Kentucky, near Morganfield. My master was Mr. Ray, he made me call him Mr. Ray, wouldent let me call him Master. He said I was his little free negro.” When asked if there were many slaves on Mr. Ray’s farm, he said, “Yes’m, they was seven cabin of us. I was the oldes’ child in our family. Mr. Ray said “He didn’t want me in the tobacco”, so I stayed at the house and waited on the women folk and went after the cows when I was big enough. I carried my stick over my shoulder for I wus afraid of snakes.” “Mr. Ray was always very good to me, he liked to play with me, cause I was so full of tricks an’ so mischuvus. He give me...

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Biography of Roderick Morrison

Roderick Morrison, a well known oil producer and manufacturer at Independence, became identified with the oil industry in the eastern states when a young man, and while other enterprises have engaged him his interests have been continuousty identified with some phase of the petroleum industry through all his active years. Out of his experience he had elaborated one of the important devices used in oil and gas fields, and is now manufacturing it at Independence under the name of the Eclipse Pulling Machine. Mr. Morrison is a Canadian by birth and of Scotch ancestry. His grandfather was Angus Morrison, who spent his life on a farm in Scotland. His father was George Morrison, who was born in Southerlandshire, Scotland, in 1809, and emigrated to Canada in 1841, settling on a farm in Oxford County, Ontario. He gave the best years of his life to agriculture, but was a man of considerable prominence in local affairs, serving on the school board and in other occupations. He was a conservative in politics, and an active member of the Presbyterian Church, in which he held the position of elder. George Morrison married Henrietta MeIntosh, who was born in Southerland, Scotland, in 1821, and died in Oxford County, Ontario, in 1885. George Morrison died on the old farm in Ontario in 1893. Their children were: Elizabeth, deceased wife of John McCall, who is...

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Biography of Angus Morrison, Q.C.

The subject of this sketch was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, January 20th, 1824, and came to this country when but eight years old, in company with his father Hugh Morrison, and other members of the family. Mr. Hugh Morrison was killed by an accident at the old Market Square in Toronto, while taking part in a political meeting in 1836. He had been one of the famous 42nd Highlanders and served with his regiment through the Peninsular War. Angus Morrison was educated partly in Belfast, Ireland, and partly in Upper Canada College; Toronto, but after a short attendance at the latter institution, he left it to enter a Grammar School where he finished his studies. During this time and for several years after leaving school Mr. Morrison took great interest in all manly outdoor sports, but his forte was in the use of the oars. Strong in body and thoroughly trained in exercising and developing his muscular powers, he won and held the championship of Toronto Bay in 1840-41 and ’42 and still possesses the trophies of his victories, and continued President of the Toronto Rowing Club for fourteen years. Curling, shooting, cricketing, and kindred sports, he also excelled in; was first Secretary and afterwards President of the Toronto Curling Club for two years; was Secretary of the St. Andrew’s Society for eleven years, and two years President. Discontinuing...

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Biography of Henry Craig Morrison

Henry Craig Morrison, secretary, treasurer and general manager of the Morrison Lee Mining & Development Company, president of the Contract Waterproofing Company and also secretary of the Arkansas Mining & Mercantile Company, has won a most creditable position in business circles in St. Louis, his native city. He was born July 22, 1888, and is a son of John W. Morrison of St. Louis, whose birth occurred in Georgetown, Kentucky, and who comes of an old family of English lineage. The first representatives of the name landed at Plymouth during the early colonization of Massachusetts, and for a century the. family was represented in Kentucky before John W. Morrison became a resident of St. Louis. Here he entered prominently into the business life of the city as a member of the dry goods firm of Hargardine McKittrick & Company. He wedded Mary Elizabeth Sparks, who was born in Fort Smith, Arkansas, and is a daughter of Mitchell Sparks, who belonged to one of the old families of Arkansas that settled at Fort Smith prior to the Civil war. Mrs. Morrison is still a resident of St. Louis. In the schools of his native city Henry Craig Morrison pursued his education until he had completed a course in the Central high school and later he attended the Rolla School of Mines, from which he was graduated in 1913 with the...

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Biography of William C. Morrison

WILLIAM C. MORRISON. This gentleman is the efficient collector of Ozark County, Missouri, a position he has held since 1889, and from 1887 to 1888 he discharged the duties of county assessor. He owes his nativity to the Blue Grass State, his birth occurring in Barren County, June 10, 1842, his parents, Joseph S. and Nancy J. (Low) Morrison, being also natives of that State. The paternal grandfather, Steptoe Morrison, was a native of the Palmetto State, but was an early emigrant to Barren County, Kentucky, and later to Arkansas, in which State he spent his last days. Solomon Low, the maternal grandfather, was a Virginian, and became a pioneer settler of Barren County, Kentucky Joseph S. Morrison was born in 1826 or 1827, and when the Civil War came up he enlisted in the Fifth Kentucky Cavalry, and being a skillful blacksmith, he was made chief of the blacksmith corps of his regiment. He served from July, 1861, until his death which occurred at Nashville, Tennessee, in 1863, having proved himself a brave, faithful and conscientious soldier. He was a Master Mason, was a stanch Republican in politics, and was a man of unblemished reputation. His widow died in Barren County, Kentucky, in 1886, having become the mother of eight children: William C.; Sarah E., who died at the age of fifteen years; John, who also died young;...

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Biography of Alonzo O. Morrison

Alonzo O. Morrison. One of the families that was established in Vermilion County, Illinois, in the early ’40s and has ever since been a representative agricultural one in east central Illinois bore the name of Morrison. This branch of the family was of pioneer stock in Ohio and doubtless can trace its far back ancestry to Scotland. The leading representative in Champaign County is Alonzo O. Morrison, a highly respected resident of Homer, Illinois. Alonzo O. Morrison was born in Vermilion County, Illinois, November 17, 1859. His parents were James Perry and Harriet A. (Sterns) Morrison. The father was born in Ohio and the mother in Virginia. When they came to Illinois James Perry Morrison secured land from the government, and this land he developed and his subsequent life was devoted to general farming and stock-raising. He was a man of sterling character, just in all his dealings with his neighbors and generous to his children. His death occurred in 1888. His widow survived until 1894. They were the parents of the following children: Elijah, who is a resident of Homer, Illinois; James, who died in infancy; Alonzo O.; Jasper, who died in childhood; Florence, who is the wife of J. M. Boggess, of Homer; and Harland P., who resides at Homer. Alonzo O. Morrison attended the public schools and remained at home assisting his father. When he was...

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Biography of R. G. Morrison

R. G. Morrison. A Rantoul residence almost palatial in its architectural design, size and comforts is the home of Mr. and Mrs. R. G. Morrison in their retired years. Mr. Morrison is a veteran of the Civil War and fought gallantly for the preservation of the Union when the nation needed his services. His industrious efforts as a farmer brought him large rewards and though he began with very modest capital he acquired one of the handsomest estates of Champaign County. Mr. Morrison was born in Muskingum County, Ohio, son of Mr. and Mrs. Abram Morrison, his father a native of Ohio and his mother of Pennsylvania. In the early days Mr. Morrison attended district schools in the vicinity of Zanesville, Ohio. The schoolhouse which stands clearest in his memory was an old log building. It had slab benches, a desk supported by pins driven into the side wall, and the instruction was as crude and limited as the furnishings of the building. Occasionally the pupils would attend school for six months in the year, though the usual term was three months. He was only eighteen years of age when he enlisted at Zanesville for service in the Union army. He became a member of the Home. Guard and was ordered with his comrades to Maryland, to Harper’s Ferry, then to Baltimore, and he did service chiefly as a...

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Biography of Robert Wilson Morrison

ROBERT WILSON MORRISON. – This leading pioneer of the immigration of 1844 was born March 14, 1811, in Fleming County, Kentucky, of Scotch parentage. In 1822 he moved with his parents to Montgomery County, Missouri, living with them until his marriage in 1831, to Miss Nancy Irwin. Two years later a move was made to Clay County, and thence to Clinton County, on the border of the territory occupied by the Indians of the plains. Upon the consummation of the “Platte purchase,” he moved with his family into that frontier region, and for six years lived in Andrew County. The excitement and interest in respect to Oregon was then, in 1843-44, reaching a high pitch among the people of the frontier; and in that particular neighborhood the Oregon fever was still further inflamed by letters from a man named Smith, formerly of that section, but then in Oregon, who was urging his people to come to the land by the Pacific Ocean. Indeed, all information obtainable was found to be favorable to Oregon; and, in time for the trip next season, Mr. Morrison was among the number who were armed, equipped and well prepared for the march across the plains. His wife and six children were of course to accompany him; and there were two young men taken into the family as fellow-travelers, – John Minto and Willard H....

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Biography of William Morrison

William Morrison. Along the Interurban as it passes through Ogden Township are found some beautiful farms, all of them representing the toil, self-sacrifice and industry of either their owners or of those worthy people who first claimed the land from the wilderness. One of these homes that stand for a most estimable personal career is that of William Morrison in section 8 of Ogden Township. Mr. Morrison was born in New York City in 1851. When he was ten years of age he was left an orphan by the death of his parents, and somewhat later a man named George H. Allen became interested in him and brought him out to Illinois, and he soon found a home in the family of Eleazar Freeman, with whom he was a bound boy and with whom he remained twelve years. He had very limited opportunities to obtain an education, never more than three months a year. He had to work early and late, herding and feeding cattle, plowing in the fields, and only now and then came a few weeks when he could attend school. Thus as a boy he became inured to and disciplined in hard work, and he found it no special hardship when he went to earning his own way as a farm hand and worked in the fields from four o’clock in the morning until nine o’clock...

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Biography of Thomas F. Morrison

Thomas F. Morrison. One of the prominent members of the Neosho County bar is Thomas F. Morrison, who as a practitioner at Chanute since 1903 had been connected with much of the important litigation tried in the courts of this district. He is also a leading member of the democratic party of this portion of the state, where his influence had been widely felt in political as well as professional circles, and had represented his community in the Kansas Legislature, as a member of which body he was the author of some exceedingly beneficial legislation. Mr. Morrison was born June 19, 1875, in Henry County, Missouri, and is a son of Samuel and Nancy (Phelps) Morrison, and a member of a family which came from Scotland to America during the latter part of the seventeenth century. From the original settlement in Virginia, the family moved to Tennessee, in which state, in 1789, was born the grandfather of Thomas F. Morrison, James Morrison. He passed his entire life in Tennessee, where he was a prominent planter and large slaveholder, and died in 1880 in Greene County. Samuel Morrison, father of Thomas F., was born in Greene County, Tennessee, in 1833, and was there reared, educated and married. He engaged in farming there until 1862, when he enlisted in the Sixth Tennessee Cavalry, for service during the Civil war, and served...

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Biography of Joseph L. Morrison, Hon.

Hon. Joseph L. Morrison. Few men are more prominent or more widely known in the northern part of Neosho County than is Hon. Joseph L. Morrison, mayor of the City of Chanute, who had been an important factor in business affairs and whose success in his undertaking had been so marked that his methods are of interest to the commercial world. He is energetic, prompt and notably reliable, and tireless energy, keen perception, honesty of purpose, and a genius for devising and executing the right thing at the right time are his chief characteristics. As the chief executive of Chanute he is giving the people a clean, progressive and business-like administration. Mr. Morrison was born on a farm in Stark County, Illinois, July 11, 1867, and is a son of Jacob and Phoebe (Johnson) Morrison. The family originated in Scotland, and it is thought that Mr. Morrison’s grandfather, Andrew Morrison, born in 1789, who died in Greene County, Ohio, in 1869, was the first American settler. He was a pioneer into Ohio and passed his long and useful life there engaged in agricultural pursuits. Jacob Morrison, the father of Joseph L., was born on the homestead place in Greene County, Ohio, February 8, 1833, received an ordinary public school education, and as a youth learned the trade of stone mason, which he followed in connection with farming all his...

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Eugene Morrison, Jr.

Wagoner, Anti-Aircraft, C. A. C.; of Iredell County; son of Eugene, Sr., and Adelaide Scarr Morrison. Entered service April 3, 1917, at Charlotte, N.C. Sent to Ft. Caswell, N.C. Sailed for France June 19, 1918. Promoted to Wagoner January, 1918. Fought at Toul Sector, Meuse-Argonne Sector. Returned to USA March 8, 1919, at Hoboken, N. J. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., March 24,...

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Morrison, Abraham – Obituary

A son of one of the Kittitas Valley’s earliest pioneer families, Abraham David Morrison, died in the Ellensburg General Hospital at 10:30 a.m. today [March 28, 1953], at the age of 69. He had been seriously ill for the past two months and entered the hospital Friday. He was one of seven children of the late Mr. and Mrs. William Morrison, who came to the valley in 1870. He was born on the original Morrison homestead, one mile northeast of the town of Kittitas, and attended the Denmark district school. He married Rose Dorothy Davis of Ellensburg, here, May 18, 1919. During the early part of his adult life, Morrison engaged in contracting in Kittitas. In 1932, he took a ranch in Badger Pocket, which he worked until 1946, when he retired to live in Ellensburg. He is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Mary McDonald of Route 2, Ellensburg; four sons, Dave Morrison of Route 3, Ellensburg, Ed and Roy Morrison of Route 2, Ellensburg, and Cpl. Ralph Morrison, with the US Air Force at Biloxi, Miss.; and six grandchildren. Funeral arrangements are to be announced by Evenson Funeral Home. My information says that Abe was born January 9, 1883 which would make him 70 years old. His mother was Catherine Wheeler. Contributed by: Shelli...

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