Surname: Morgan

Biographical Sketch of Mordecai Morgan

Mordecai Morgan, of Shelby County, Kentucky, married Catharine Turner, and settled in (now) Warren County, Missouri, in 1814. He was a noted pioneer of that County, and the first County Court was held in his house. His children were Malinda, Hiram, Rachel, Maranda, Matilda, Missouri, Martha, and Minerva. Malinda married James Bryan, a son of David Bryan. Hiram was a ranger in Nathan Boone’s company. He died of cholera, at Rock Island, in 1832. Rachel married Samuel Dougherty, of Warren County. Alaranda married Louisa Harper, of Lincoln County. Matilda married Levi Hinds, of Tennessee, who settled in Warren County. Missouri ‘died single. Martha married William Harper, who is at present a banker in Mexico, Missouri. Minerva married Edward Pleasants, of Virginia, who settled in Warren County, Missouri, in...

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Biography of William Y. Morgan, Hon.

Hon. William Y. Morgan is one of the men who have attained sufficiency of public distinction so that he might merely give his address as Kansas and every one would know the who’s who and who’s what about him. He was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, April 6, 1866, a son of W. A. and Minnie (Yoast) Morgan. His father served as an officer in the Twenty-third Kentucky Regiment in the Union army, and in 1871 brought his family to Kansas. For forty years he was editor of the Cottonwood Falls Leader and at the same time was prominent in public affairs, was a member of the Legislature, the State Senate, and was department commander of the Grand Army of the Republic. Mr. Morgan’s mother was department president of the Woman’s Relief Corps and was an active newspaper woman and prominent in the public life of women in Kansas. William Y. Morgan was educated in the University of Kansas, graduating with the degree A. B. in the class of 1885. He has always been deeply interested in the state university, served four years as regent, and is a loyal member of the college fraternity Phi Gamma Delta. Practical experience in journalism, which has been his chief business interest all his active career, he first gained as a reporter for the Lawrence Journal during 1886-88. In 1888 Mr. Morgan bought the...

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Biographical Sketch of Charles F. Morgan

Morgan, Charles F.; lawyer; born, Oberlin, Ohio, Aug. 3, 1851; son of John and Elizabeth Leonard Morgan; graduated from Oberlin College, in 1872, degrees A. B. and A. M.; married, Cleveland, July 12, 1883, Mary Betheah Roach; two sons, Whittier Roach, and Gilbert Eugene; counselor and trial lawyer in all kinds of law; equity and patent cases. Recreations: Mechanical Constructions, care of his Home, Automobile Riding, Elocution, and his business itself; is a professing Christian, a strong believer in the Bible, hates infidelity and everything else that is profane and degrading, and believes that no man is happier than he is unless he is one who has a more beautiful vision of eternity and of every thing beautiful and...

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Biographical Sketch of Robert David Morgan

Morgan, Robert David; attorney; born, Cleveland, Oct. 26, 1879; son of Robert and Katherine Morgan; educated, Cleveland Grammar and High School, Milwaukee Medical College, Baldwin University, LL. B.; married, Cleveland, Dec. 31, 1904, Margaret Taylor Silsby; issue, three daughters, and one son; formerly private sec’y to the late Robert W. Taylor, U. S. District Judge; partner Morgan & Nally, attorney for Casualty Company of America, and Federal Union Surety Co.; member Delta Phi Delta Legal Fraternity, and Knights of Columbus; admitted to the bar in 1906. Recreation: Hunting and...

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Biographical Sketch of William Kelly Morgan

William Kelly Morgan, engaged in the monument business in Muskogee, was born in Independence county, Arkansas, on the 2d of September, 1874. Having completed his public school education he devoted his attention to farming until 1908, manifesting at all times that spirit of industry which has characterized him in his later commercial pursuits. He brought his land under a high state of cultivation and carried on the work of the farm until 1908, when he became engaged in general merchandising at Colegate, Oklahoma, where he remained for two and a half years. On the expiration of that period he turned his attention to the marble and granite business as a monument maker and in 1919 he came to Muskogee, where he has since carried on business under his own name, having his establishment at No. 217 South Cherokee street. Here he employs four men and is enjoying a good patronage, which is steadily growing by reason of the value and attractiveness of the work turned out. He has been the maker of some of the finest monuments seen in this section and his business is steadily growing. In 1901 Mr. Morgan was united in marriage to Miss Stella Plummer, a granddaughter of Joseph R. Plummer, whose quarter strain of Indian blood makes him a prominent representative of the Choctaw Nation. Mr. and Mrs. Morgan have an interesting family of...

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Biography of Thomas W. Morgan

Thomas W. Morgan is warden of the Federal prison at Leavenworth. He began his career in Kansas as a newspaper man. Newspaper work brought him naturally into touch with all sorts and conditions of men and affairs and he is only one of many examples that might be noted of newspaper men who have graduated into other spheres of interest and activity. For a number of years Mr. Morgan had been connected with the penal and reformatory institutions of the state, and had become deeply interested in the many sociological problems involved in the handling and administration of prison affairs. He was not new to the work when an appointment under the present administration brought him to the wardenship of the United States prison at Leavenworth. He had an experience founded on careful observation and study along humanitarian lines. Those familiar with his works and his methods say that Warden Morgan had maintained an unusual balance between the practical and the theoretical in prison administration. He never loses sight of the fact that men go to prison because they have committed some offense against society and that they are at least a potential danger to society. Nevertheless he had regarded every inmate under his supervision as a human being and had exercised all possible care to the end that the individual may have a chance to reform and become...

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Biography of Lewis B. Morgan

Lewis B. Morgan, lawyer and chairman of the county court, was born in Lincoln County, Tennessee, in 1834. He is the son of Smith and Abigail (Alexander) Morgan, natives of Tennessee. The former was born in 1806, and the latter in 1809. They are now residents of Fayetteville, Tennessee, and are members of the Baptist Church. Until his seventeenth year our subject lived with his parents on the farm, and then learned the blacksmithing trade, following that, together with farming for a number of years. In 1856 he went to Kansas with a company of 365 men, joining them at Montgomery, Alabama, for the purpose of pre-empting lands, and while there joined the pro-slavery party, and took up arms against John Brown and his supporters. In the fall of 1856 he returned to Fayetteville, and worked at his trade until the breaking out of the war, when he enlisted in Company F., of the Fourth Tennessee Regulars, Infantry, commanded by Baxter Smith. He was afterward transferred to Company I, Fourth Tennessee Infantry. He served throughout the war, the latter part of which he was a member of Jefferson Davis’ escort. At the close of the war he returned to Fayetteville, and for two years engaged in raising cotton. At the end of this time he came to Tullahoma and engaged in farming until 1880, when he opened a blacksmith...

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Morgan, Martha – Obituary

Union, Union County, Oregon Martha Ann Morgan of 873 S. College in Union died Friday, Aug. 25 at the local hospital at the age of 51. Mrs. Morgan was born on Dec. 11, 1920 at Bakersfield, Calif., the daughter of Thomas and Bessie Davis She was a graduate of Woodbury Art College in Los Angeles, Calif. On March 2, 1946, she was married to Jefferson Lee Morgan at Las Vegas, Nev. They lived in Bakersfield, Calif. until September of 1968 when they moved to Union. She was a member of the Union Rebekah Lodge and President of the Union Home Extension Unit. Survivors include her husband J. Lee Morgan, Union; two daughters, Teresa Lee Morgan and Judy Ann Morgan both of Union; brother, Elvin Davis, Bakersfield, Calif., sister Betty Beebe, Bakersfield, Calif.; numerous nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held on Wednesday, Aug. 30 with Rev. Robert Dowery and the Union Rebekah Lodge officiating. Concluding services followed at the Union Cemetery. Eastern Oregon Review, August 31, 1972 Contributed by: Holly...

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N. J. Morgan

Private, Inf., Co. D, 321st Regt., 81st Div. Born in Moore County, N.C., March 19, 1891; son of J. P. and Sarah Anne Morgan. Entered the service at Tarboro, N.C., April 25, 1918, and sent to Camp Jackson, S. C., and then transferred to Camp Sevier, S. C. Sailed for France Aug. 11, 1918. Fought at Meuse-Argonne. Mustered out of the service at Camp Lee, Va., July 3,...

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Rom. H. Morgan

Private 1st Class, Hospital Corps 107. Born in Johnston County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Morgan. Husband of Mrs. Pearl Morgan. Entered service March, 1917, at Benson, N.C. Was sent to Ft. Thomas, Ky., and from there to Sherman, Ohio. Transferred to Camp Upton and sailed for France Aug. 30, 1918. Returned to USA July 13, 1919, and was mustered out July, 1919, at Camp Lee,...

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Ernest Morgan

Private, Inf., Co. L, 30th Div., 118th Regt.; of Guilford County; son of J. A. and Mrs. C. F. Morgan. Entered service Aug. 29, 1917, at High Point. Sent to Camp Sevier, Greenville, S. C. Transferred to Camp Mills, L. I. Sailed for France May 11, 1918. Fought at St. Quentin, in all engagements from Sept. 29th until Oct. 17th. Wounded near Verdun Canal by shell in three places Oct. 17th. Sent to Armer Hospital, Base No. 21. Decoration for heroism at Vaux-Andigny, France, on Oct. 12th. Received the Distinguished Service Cross from Gen. J. J. Pershing on Nov. 26, 1918. Returned to USA Dec. 23, 1918. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., March 13,...

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W. R. Morgan

1st Class Private, Co. A, 30th Div., 105th Eng. Regt.; of Moore County; son of J. A. and Mrs. C. F. Morgan. Entered service July 30, 1917, at High Point. Sent to Camp Sevier, S. C. Sailed for France May 26, 1918. Fought at Ypres, Hindenburg Line, Sept. 29th. Gassed at Hindenburg Line Sept. 29, 1918. Sent to British Gen. Hospital No. 74. Returned to USA April 13, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., April 18,...

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Biography of Benjamin Franklin Morgan M.D.

Benjamin Franklin Morgan, M. D., is a physician and surgeon of nearly thirty years’ experience, almost all of which time had been spent in the State of Kansas, and the past seventeen years in the City of Clay Center. The name “Dr. Morgan” is a household word in almost every family throughout Clay and surrounding counties, as four of the immediate family have practiced in Clay Center and never since the year 1883 had there been a time when the familiar form and genial smile of one or more of this family of physicians did not form a part of the memories of a day spent on the streets of Clay Center, and during quite a number of these years the “Shingle” of “Doctors Morgan & Morgan” had swung in the breezes or basked lazily in the sunshine of the Sunflower state. This branch of the Morgan family originated in Wales. Doctor Morgan’s early ancestor came to America just before the Revolutionary war, in which war he joined with the colonists and fought with them for independence. After that he settled in Kentucky. Doctor Morgan’s father, E. D. Morgan, was born at Sardis in the Blue Grass state in the year 1816. In his early manhood he learned the tailor’s trade, which he followed most successfully for many years. In the year 1838 E. D. Morgan was united in...

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Biography of James Morgan

James Morgan, farmer, Sec. 20; P. O. Oakland; one of the early pioneers of Coles Co.; born in Vermilion Co., Ind., April 20, 1830; he was the youngest son of David Morgan, who was born in Washington Co., Ky., Nov. 18, 1797; he emigrated from Kentucky to Indiana with his family, where he lived until he emigrated to Coles Co., Ill., where he located April 20, 1834, in what is now Morgan Tp., the township being named in honor of David Morgan. He married Oct. 7, 1818, to Jane Rodman she was born in Kentucky, June 9, 1799; six children were the fruit of this union, five of whom emigrated to Illinois with the family at the above date, one having died in infancy; the names of the living were Sarah, Catharine J., Mary E., William and James; Mr. Morgan died Sept. 10, 1860; Mrs. Morgan died Jan. 31, 1832. The subject of this sketch was 4 years of age when he emigrated to Coles Co,, Ill., in 1834; he lived with his parents until 19 years of age, when he managed the farm until the decease of his father, since which time he has continued to live upon the old homestead, where he has lived for a period of forty-five years; he owns upon his home farm 112 acres, and 8 acres of timber in Oakland Tp.; when...

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Biography of William Morgan

William Morgan, farmer; P. O. Rardin; born in Sullivan Co., Ind., Dec. 13, 1827; he emigrated with his parents when 8 years old and located in what is now known as Morgan Tp. in 1834, and before the organization of the township, which is named in honor of his father, David Morgan, who resided here from 1835 until his death, which occurred in October, 1860. The subject of this sketch lived with his parents and assisted in farming until 1850, when he engaged in farming for himself upon the place where he has since lived; he owns 320 acres in his home farm and 320 acres in other parts of the township; when Mr. Morgan first located in this township, it was inhabited by Indians, whose camps were along the river, their chief camps being along Brush Creek, where the mounds may be seen to this day; wolves were plenty, and to obtain quail, prairie chickens, turkeys or deer, it was hardly necessary to step outside of the door-yard; his trips to mill consumed four days, and the distance was fifty miles, either to Eugene on the Wabash, or to Terre Haute; at that early date, he had only two neighbors, and from his location at the north part of what is now Morgan Tp. to within a half mile froth Charleston, a distance of twelve miles, there was...

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