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Surname: Morgan

Biographical Sketch of Gideon Morgan

(See Oolootsa)-Gideon Morgan, born April 3, 1851. Married June 25, 1874 Mary Llewellyn Payne, born October 1, 1855 in Sebastian County, Arkansas. They are the parents of: Houston Mayo, born May 4, 1875; Mary Llewellyn born June 23, 1877; Martha Lelia, born November 13, 1879; Margaret Elizabeth, born October 25, 1882; Amanda Payne, born Aug. 25, 1885; Sallie Mayo born April 15, 1888 and Ellen Payne Morris Morgan, born March 4, 1896. Gideon Morgan was elected Senator from Tahlequah District, Aug. 5, 1901. Elected a member of the legislature from Mayes County, November 5, 1912 and November 5, 1918. Joseph, the son of General John Sevier married Elizabeth Lowry, a half blood Cherokee and their daughter Margaret, born October 8, 1799. Married October 27, 1813, Gideon Morgan, born at Ramorga, Connecticut, August 6, 1776. He died September 18, 1851 and was buried at Calhoun, Tennessee. Mrs. Morgan died March 25, 1862. Gideon Morgan organized and was Major of the Cherokee battalion that were allies of the Americans in the Creek war of 1814. Gideon and Margaret (Sevier) Morgan were the parents of George Morgan, born December 2, 1817. Married October 26, 1848 Martha Keziah Mayo, born in Washington, Fay County, Tennessee June 16, 1826. He was a Captain in the Mexican war and Major of the Third Tennessee Volunteer Infantry C. S. A. 1861 to May 1862 and Major...

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Slave Narrative of America Morgan

Interviewer: Anna Pritchett Person Interviewed: America Morgan Location: Indiana Place of Birth: Ballard County, Kentucky Date of Birth: 1852 Place of Residence: 816 Camp Street Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue FOLKLORE MRS. AMERICA MORGAN-EX-SLAVE 816 Camp Street America Morgan was born in a log house, daubed with dirt, in Ballard County, Kentucky, in 1852, the daughter of Manda and Jordon Rudd. She remembers very clearly the happenings of her early life. Her mother, Manda Rudd, was owned by Clark Rudd, and the “devil has sure got him.” Her father was owned by Mr. Willingham, who was very kind to his slaves. Jordon became a Rudd, because he was married to Manda on the Rudd plantation. There were six children in the family, and all went well until the death of the mother; Clark Rudd whipped her to death when America was five years old. Six little children were left motherless to face a “frowning world.” America was given to her master’s daughter, Miss Meda, to wait on her, as her personal property. She lived with her for one year, then was sold for $600.00 to Mr. and Mrs. Utterback stayed with them until the end of the Civil war. The new mistress was not so kind. Miss Meda, who knew her reputation, told her if she abused America, she...

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Clark Co., Ky

CLARK CO. (Mayme Nunnelley) The first records of Slaves in Clark County was given by a descendant of one of the members of the little band of resolute Revolutionary soldiers who had been comrades and mess mates throughout the long bloody war. These fifteen families, some from Virginia and others from Maryland, started westward in the early spring of 1783 for Kentucky. They bought with them some horses, a few cattle, thirty or forty slaves and a few necessary household articles. After many hardships and trials, borne heroically by both men and women, they halted on the banks of the Big Stoner, in what is now the eastern part of Clark County. Two years later another group of families with their slaves came to join this little settlement. In some cases the owners were good to their slaves had comfortable quarters for them at a reasonable distance from the main house. Their clothing was given them as they needed it. In most instances the clothing was made on the plantation Material woven, and shoes made. The cabins were one and two rooms, maybe more if the families were large. The slaves ate their meals in the kitchen of the main house. A cruel and inhuman master was ostrazied and taught by the silent contempt of his neighbors a lesson which he seldom failed to learn. In 1789 the general...

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Slave Narrative of Annie Morgan

Interviewer: Mamie Hanbery Person Interviewed: Annie Morgan Location: Hopkinsville, Kentucky Age: 65 Place of Residence: 207 W. 2nd St., Hopkinsville, Ky Story of Annie Morgan: (age 65, 207 W. 2nd St., Hopkinsville, Ky.) Annie was born of slave parents. Her mother and father were slaves of the Payne family. Ques: Annie can you give me or rather tell me of some of your earlier life with your parents, or what your mother and father has told you of things before and after the Civil War. Ans: Wal, wal, I do declare it has ben so long I’se jes don’t remember. I’se seem to remember de big days we uster hav on Proclamation Day wen we used ter go to Grandmums who lived in Trigg County. Foh days befur weuns would git redy ter go in a wagon and as dar was a heap of chilluns it tuk quite a time an weuns would start by day break and dem wen we got dar why all de rest of the daughters en sons of dar chilluns was alredy that, den weun’s hev a big time wid watermullins and ebything good to eat. Some times Uncle Ben brot hid bajo and us chilluns would dance. Ques: Annie did you ever have a dream to come true? Or do you believe in dreams? Ans: Sho does, sho does, why chile all my...

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Will of Charles Morgan – 1668

CHARLES MORGAN, Gravesend. Makes wife Katharine sole executrix. Leaves to son Charles the lot or Plantations recorded to him in the Towne Books of Gravesend. To my other three sons, Thomas, John, and Daniel, the land and Plantation I now live on, and the barn that was formerly Slynihah Loras. His wife is to have the use of the said premises, “to dwell in soe long as shee shall keepe herself a widow. All this is my mynde and will soe to be.” Mentions daughters Mary, Rachel, and Susannah. Dated “Thirteenth day of 7th month 1668.” Witness Wm. Goulding, Sam’l Spicer. Proved Oct. 7, 1668. Inventory mentions a very large number of articles of domestic use, and 6 acres of wheat, 5 acres Corn, 4 acres Oats, 2 acres Rye, 7 acres Peas. LIBER 1-2, page...

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Biographical Sketch of Daniel Morgan

DANIEL MORGAN was born December 23, 1796, in Chatham County, N. C. His parents were William and Milla (Brewer) Morgan, both natives of the same State. They both died of a fever the same day in 1804. They are buried on Hall River, N. C. Our subject came to Christian County, Ky., in 1805, with his grandfather and uncle-Nathaniel and George Brewer. Daniel is one of the two oldest men in this part of the county, James Wilke being the other. Father Morgan had five brothers. These brothers never lived together after the death of their father, and so far as known, he is the only brother living. He was the second child, and started without means. He now owns 500 acres of land, which he has divided among his children. He was married to Abarilla Martin, of this county, November 18, 1817. She died in 1847. She was a member of the Baptist Church. In 1848, he married Rebecca Tucker, of this county. She died in 1860. She was a member of the Baptist Church. She left four children, viz.: William D., James A., Nannie E. and Mary E., all of whom are living. Nannie E. is the wife of Samuel Cowan. Their children are Samuel F. and William D. In 1862 he married Susan Leveritt, of this county, but a native of South Carolina. She died in...

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Biographical Sketch of Lelia Morgan

(See Oolootsa)-Gideon Morgan, born April 3, 1851, married June,25, 1874, Mary Llewellyn Payne, born Oct. 1, 1855 in Sebastian County, Arkansas. Mr. Morgan was elected Senator from Tahlequah District August 5, 1901 ; and was elected a member of the State Legislature from Mayes County in the fourth and seventh Legislatures. Mr. and Mrs. Morgan were the parents of Houston Mayo, Mary Llewellyn, Martha Lelia, Margaret Elizabeth, Amanda Payne, Sallie Mayo, and Nellie Payne...

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Biography of Gideon Morgan

This well-known citizen of Tahlequah was born April 3, 1851, in Athens, Tennessee, the son of Major William Morgan and grandson of Colonel Gideon Morgan, of Stonewall Jackson’s army. His father was an officer in General John H. Morgan’s command, and was killed at the battle of Lexington, Kentucky, in 1862. The Morgans originally came from Wales. Colonel Gideon Morgan, already referred to, married Margaret Sevier, a granddaughter of General Sevier, who was half Cherokee, through his family connection with the Lowreys. Martha Mayo, daughter of G. W. Mayo, a white man, was mother to the subject of our sketch. He was educated by a female tutor, Miss Bettie Messimer, of Monroe County, Tennessee, until his twentieth year, when he came to Fort Gibson (in 1871), and in three years afterward married Mary Llewellan Payne, the most beautiful young woman of her time, and equally accomplished. Since then Mr. Morgan has spent most of his time farming, and at the present owns 70 acres of land on the edge of Fort Smith, one acre of which he has sold for $370. His ranch, twelve miles from the capital, contains 100 acres in cultivation, and a fine orchard. He also owns the Capital Hotel and a residence with four acres of land, beside the Baptist Mission House, in Tahlequah. In 1879 Mr. Morgan was a strong supporter of the National...

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Biography of H.B. Morgan

J. L. Bryant & Co. This firm is now composed of H. B. Morgan and J. W. Motlow. It was first established in 1872, by J. L. Bryant (now deceased) and H. B. Morgan. J. L. Bryant had himself been in business in Lynchburg since 1806. He was born September 25, 1824, in Lincoln County, and was reared in west Tennessee, and when a young man returned to Moore County, and on August 24, 1845, married Finetta B. Leftwich, and engaged in merchandising at Charity, in this county, continuing in mercantile pursuits until his death. In 1865 he was at Shelbyville, and removed from there to Lynchburg. He was also an extensive farmer and stock trader. He was drowned April 5, 1883, at Shelbyville. He was a very popular man, and was identified with the social and public interests, and was one of the most successful business men of Moore County. There now survives him a family of two daughters and his widow. H. B. Morgan was born October 14, 1842, in Lincoln County, Tennessee, being a son of W. A. and Mary (Davidson) Morgan, both now living near Montgomery, Alabama. Young Morgan remained on the farm until 1861, when he enlisted with the “boys in gray” and served till the battle of Franklin, in 1864, in which he lost an arm. He returned home in June 1865, and...

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Biographical Sketch of S. H. Morgan

S.H. Morgan, of the firm of Morgan & Berry, grocers, was born in Ind.; moved to Lucas County, Iowa, in 1859. He enlisted in 1861, in Co. C., 13th Ia. Vol.; served until Sept., 1862; then returned to Lucas County and engaged in farming; removed to Harrison County in 1864 and settled in St. Johns and engaged in the drug business; removed to Missouri in 1868, and came back to Harrison County in 18777 and located at Missouri Valley and engaged in his present...

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Biographical Sketch of M. Morgan

M. Morgan, of the firm of Butler & Morgan, grocers, was born in Scott County, Ia., in 1846. He enlisted in May 1864, in the 44th Ia. regiment, and was discharged in the autumn of the same year. He re-enlisted in Jan., 1865, in the 20th, Ia., Co. G.; was transferred to the 29th Ia. regiment, and in Sept. 1865, returned to Iowa, and engaged in farming. He located at Mapleton in 1879, and entered his present business in Jan.,...

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Biography of General Daniel Morgan

General Daniel Morgan was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, in 1737, and moved to Virginia in 1755. He was a private soldier under General Braddock, and after the defeat of that officer returned to his occupation of a farmer and a wagoner. When the war of the Revolution broke out, he joined the army under General Washington, at Cambridge, and commanded a corps of riflemen. He was with General Montgomery at Quebec, and with General Gates at Saratoga, in both of which battles he greatly distinguished himself. For his bravery he was promoted to the rank of Brigadier General, and joined the army in the South. After the battle of Camden, when General Greene assumed the chief command, General Morgan was detached to raise troops in the western part of the State and in South Carolina. He soon became distinguished as a partisan officer, inspiring confidence and arousing the despondent Whigs to a more active sense of duty. His victory at the Cowpens was justly considered as one of the most brilliant and decided victories of the Revolution, and Congress accordingly voted him a gold medal. At the close of the war, he returned to his farm. In 1794 he was appointed by General Washington to quell the Whisky Insurrection in Western Virginia, and after the difficulties were settled, he was elected a member of Congress and served from...

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Biographical Sketch of Capt. Henry E. Morgan

CAPT. HENRY E. MORGAN. – This well-known pioneer of 1849 is a native of Groton, Connecticut, and was born October 30, 1825. He moved with his parents to Meriden, in the same state, residing there until April, 1849, when he set forth for California in a bark via Cape Horn, arriving in San Francisco the following September. A short time afterwards he began a sea-faring life, and for fifteen years sailed the ocean. During that time he entered nearly all the noted foreign ports, and later purchased a vessel of his own and followed a coasting trade. In 1858 he located in Port Townsend, Washington territory, and after quitting the sea began to till the soil, and followed farming for six years. In 1863 he was elected representative from Jefferson county, and ably filled that office for two terms. In 1879 he was appointed inspector of hulls for the Puget sound district. He has invested from time to time in real estate in Port Townsend, and is now one of the largest property owners of the city, and after the buffetings of many years is safely anchored in a happy home, esteemed by his acquaintances and honored by the citizens of the town in which he lives. His family consists of a wife and one...

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Biography of Hon. Hiram D. Morgan

HON. HIRAM D. MORGAN. – This gentleman, whose portrait appears in this history, and who is so well known up and down the Sound, has had a varied pioneer life since 1853. He is a native of Ohio, having been born at Mount Ayre in 1822. During his boyhood, his parents moved to Marion and other portions of the state; and in the course of his development he learned the carpenter’s trade, which has ever been a great reliance to him. In 1846 he came out to Oskaloosa, Iowa, and in 1853 became one of the Davis party to cross the plains to Oregon. At Salmon Falls he left the train and came on to Fort Boise, and with all his possessions on his shoulders walked down to The Dalles, and at the Cascades was employed by Bush & Baker in building a large bateau and ferry-boat. In October he left for Olympia, and in 1854 built there a schooner, the Emlie Parker, on a speculation, which he sold to advantage. When the war broke out in 1855 he was engaged by Michael T. Simmons, Indian agent, to act as his secretary. Mr. Morgan was soon selected by the Indians to act as agent. He built seven houses under contract on the Squakson agency, and twelve house for the Indians on the Puyallup agency, and in 1861 was appointed...

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Biography of Judge John T. Morgan

The gentleman whose name heads this review has been a conspicuous figure in the legislative and judicial history of two states. Probably the public life of no other illustrious citizen of Idaho has extended over as long a period as his, and certainly the life of none has been more varied in service, more constant in honor, more fearless in conduct and more stainless in reputation. His career has been one of activity, full of incidents and results. In every sphere of life in which he has been called upon to move he has made an indelible impression, and by his excellent public service and upright life he has honored the state, which has honored him with high official preferment. Judge Morgan was born in Hamburg, Erie County, New York. His ancestors, leaving the little rock-ribbed country of Wales, became early settlers of New England, and through many generations members of the family were residents of Connecticut and active participants in the affairs which go to form’ the colonial history of the nation. In the war of the Revolution they fought for the independence of the country, and at all times have been loyal to American interests. James Clark Morgan, the father of the Judge, was born in Connecticut in 1798, and married Penelope Green, a native of Herkimer County, New York. He was an industrious farmer and served...

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