Surname: Mather

Ancestors of Horace Alden Keith of Brockton, MA

Horace Alden Keith, founder of the Brockton Webbing Company, one of the successful and thriving industries of Brockton, and one of that city’s enterprising and progressive business men, is a descendant on both his paternal and maternal sides of historic old New England ancestry. Mr. Keith was born in West Bridgewater May 25, 1862, eldest son of the late Henry Snell and Thalia (Alden) Keith. The ancestral line of the branch of the Keith family in this country to which Horace Alden Keith belongs, and which follows, is given in chronological order from the first American ancestor. Rev. James Keith, born in 1644, was educated in Aberdeen, Scotland (as tradition says at the expense of a maiden aunt), where he was graduated likely from Marischal College, his name appearing on the roll of 1657, said college having been founded by George, the fifth Earl of Keith Marischal, in 1593. At the age of eighteen years he emigrated to this country, arriving at Boston in 1662. He was introduced to the church at Bridgewater by Dr. Increase Mather, and became settled as the minister of the Bridgewater Church Feb. 18, 1664. Rev. James Keith passed away in West Bridgewater July 23, 1719, aged seventy-six years, having labored in the ministry of the town for fifty-six years.

Read More

Descendants of Charles Keith of Bridgewater, Massachusetts

For the ancestry of Charles Keith, please see Descendants of Rev. James Keith of Bridgewater, Massachusetts (VI) Charles Keith, son of Benjamin, was born Aug. 8, 1794, and married Dec. 8, 1817, Mehitable Perkins, born March 23, 1795, daughter of Josiah and Anna (Reynolds) Perkins, of North Bridgewater, both of whom were descendants of historic old New England families. To this union were born children as follows: Damaris Williams Keith, born Oct. 8, 1818, married Vinal Lyon, of North Bridgewater, where she died; Charles Perkins Keith, born June 20, 1820, is mentioned below; Anna Reynolds Keith, born Nov. 11,...

Read More

Mayhew, Brainard, Elliot, and Monroe Missions

From 1822, to the time they were dispossessed of every foot of their ancient domains, and driven away to a then wilderness, the schools increased in numbers, and the ordinances of religion were augmented, and a deeper interest manifested every where over their country never witnessed before; as they, previous to that time, had had intercourse with the debased of the White Race, by whom they had been taught in the school of vice, and nothing but vice: therefore the North American Indians have been accused, from first to last, of having no conception of an over-ruling providence the Creator of all things, and an effort has been made to sustain the charge in that they believed in the supernatural power of their rainmakers, their fair weather makers, and the incantations of their doctors. But the charge is utterly false. ‘Tis true, they relied on their rain-makers, fair weather makers and the conjuring of their doctors, through the belief that, by prayer and supplication, those person ages had been endowed with supernatural powers by the Great Spirit, (their God and ours), in whom all Indians believed, and with greater veneration than the whites, and I defy successful contradiction. They sought the aid of the rainmakers, doctors, &c, just as we do the prayers of our preachers in behalf of our sick, and for our rain, etc. Now, what more...

Read More

Choctaw Warpath & Dress

There were many natural orators among the ancient Choctaws when living in undisturbed prosperity and happiness east of the Mississippi River. Their orations were very concise, animating and abounding in many beautiful metaphors; and who, had they possessed the embellishments of a refined education, would have compared well with any race of mankind that ever existed. The Choctaws, like all their race, deliberated with great dignity and solemnity on national affairs; and in all their assemblies, both, national and social, everything was carried on in the best order and unassumed decorum. Their treaties were ratified by smoking the pipe of peace an emblem respected, honored, and held sacred by all Indians every where. As with all their race, so war was, in the estimation of the ancient Choctaws, the most patriotic avocation in which a man could engage; they seldom began a war with another tribe, but rather waited for an attack, then no braver or more resolute warriors ever went upon the war-path. The opening of hostilities was always preceded by the famous Hoyopa-hihla, War dance. Night was the chosen time for engaging in that time honored ceremony; and as soon as evening began to spread her dark mantle over their forests, a huge pile of dry logs and brush previously prepared was set on fire, whose glaring and crackling flames intermingling with their hoyopa-taloah (war-songs) and soul-stirring hoyopa-tassuhah (war-hoops)...

Read More

The Discovery Of This Continent, it’s Results To The Natives

In the year 1470, there lived in Lisbon, a town in Portugal, a man by the name of Christopher Columbus, who there married Dona Felipa, the daughter of Bartolome Monis De Palestrello, an Italian (then deceased), who had arisen to great celebrity as a navigator. Dona Felipa was the idol of her doting father, and often accompanied him in his many voyages, in which she soon equally shared with him his love of adventure, and thus became to him a treasure indeed not only as a companion but as a helper; for she drew his maps and geographical charts, and...

Read More

Narrative of the Captivity and Sufferings of Miss Sarah Gerish – Indian Captivities

Miss Sarah Gerish, who was Taken at the Sacking of Dover, in the Year 1689, by the Indians; as Communicated to the Reverend Dr. Cotton Mather, by the Reverend John Pike, Minister of Dover. Sarah Gerish, daughter of Capt. John Gerish, of Quochecho or Cocheco, was a very beautiful and ingenious damsel, about seven years of age, and happened to be lodging at the garrison of Major Waldron, her affectionate grandfather, when the Indians brought that horrible destruction upon it, on the night of the 27th of June, 1689. She was always very fearful of the Indians; but fear may we think now surprised her, when they fiercely bid her go into a certain chamber and call the people out! She obeyed, but finding only a little child in bed in the room, she got into the bed with it, and hid herself in the clothes as well as she could. The fell Indians quickly pulled her out, and made her dress for a march, but led her way with no more than one stocking upon her, on a terrible march through the thick woods, and a thousand other miseries, till they came to the Norway Planes. 1These planes are in the present town of Rochester, N. H. Editor.  From thence they made her go to the end of Winnipisiogee Lake, thence eastward, through horrid swamps, where sometimes they...

Read More

John Gyles Captivity Narrative – Indian Captivities

John Gyles captivity narrative provides a stunning display of Abenaki culture and lifestyle, as it was in the 1690’s. John was 10 years old when he was taken captive in the attack on Pemaquid (Bristol Maine) and his narrative provides an accounting of his harrowing treatment by his Indian captors, as well as the three years exile with his French owners at Jemseg New Bruswick. His faith in Christ remains central in the well-being of his mind throughout his ordeal.

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Samuel Mather

Mather, Samuel; financier; born, Cleveland, O., July 13, 1851; son of Samuel Livingston and Georgianna Pomeroy (Woolson) Mather; educated in the public schools of Cleveland, and St. Mark’s School, at Southboro, Mass.; married, Cleveland, Oct. 19, 1881, Miss Flora Stone (died Jan. 19, 1909); issue, Samuel Livingston, Amasa Stone, Phillip Richard, and Constance; took up business life when a young man; associated with his father, and at the latter’s death, became his successor in the Pickands-Mather Co.; interested officially in many other corporations, prominently connected with the iron and steel trade of the country; deeply interested in and a large giver to educational and charitable institutions; senior warden of Trinity Cathedral parish; member executive committee, National Civic Federation; member central committee of American National Red Cross Society; pres. Children’s Aid Society; pres. and treas. of the Home for Aged Women; vice pres. University School; director of the Floating Bethel and City Mission; the Cleveland Museum of Art; chairman of the Hanna Monument Ass’n; trustee of Western Reserve University, of Adelbert College, Hiram House, Goodrich House, Kenyon College, and Case Library Ass’n; interested in Lakeside...

Read More

Biography of Samuel Wayne Mather

Mather, Samuel Wayne; manufacturer; born, Schuyler, N. Y., July 27, 1849; son of Asaph and Betsy Emily Davis Mather; limited education; his father was seriously injured when he was young, so could not go to school, after he was 11 years old; went to work to help support the family; worked three years in the woods burning charcoal; moved to Cattaraugus County, N. Y., with his parents and tor five years worked on his father’s farm; married, Frankville, N. Y., Sept. 6, 1887, Addie Viola Cooley; issue, five children, two living, Addie and William; his first wife died July 9, 1902; married the second time, Cleveland, Jan. 24, 1907, Lora E. Rock; two children, Arlo and Arline; came to Cleveland at the age of 22, and went into the grocery business; was in the business two and one-half years, lost all his money, and was over $2,000 in debt; but did not go into bankruptcy, but paid all his debts, dollar for dollar, with interest; worked at carpenter work till 1877; then went to Philadelphia, and manufactured a fire lighter of his own patent for one and one-half years; sold out and went to Cambridgeport, Mass.; remained there one year manufacturing the fire lighters; in 1879, sold out his patent, and returned to Cleveland, and established the Union Ladder & Washboard Works; in 1882, began making caskets to sell...

Read More

Biography of Frederic Gregory Mather

FREDERIC GREGORY MATHER AN ALBANIAN whose name shines with no dim lustre in the republic of letters, is Frederic G. Mather. Born in the city of Cleveland, Ohio, on the nth day of August, 1844, he is a son of Samuel Holmes Mather, LL. D., of that city. This cultured gentleman was born in Jj 1813, at Washington, N. H.; his father was Dr. Ozias Mather of fl East Haddam, Conn. In 1835, a year after his graduation from Dartmouth College, Samuel H. Mather removed to Cleveland, when the city was a village of only four thousand inhabitants, today it is a city with a population of two hundred and fifty thousand. In 1849, he established the Society for Savings, the first institution west of the Hudson River, on the plan of savings banks in New England and New York. It is now the largest institution of its kind in the west, the deposits aggregating over $20,000,000. He also organized the public library of Cleveland; and, besides being still an honored member of the Cleveland bar, he has for many years been president of the institution which he took such pride in establishing. In 1889, Dartmouth College gave him the degree of LL.D. His only brother, now deceased, was Henry Brainard Mather, who was for many years, a partner of the late Hon. Amos A. Lawrence, in Boston, under...

Read More

Search

Free Genealogy Archives


It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest