Surname: King

Biographical Sketch of Isaac King

Isaac King, of Germany, settled in Wythe County, Va., and married Barbara Stroup (late Mrs. Fipps, of Montgomery County, Mo.), by whom he had one son, John P. The latter settled in Montgomery County in 1835, and married Susan Stephenson; a granddaughter of James Heller, of revolutionary fame, and who was at the battle of Bunker...

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Biographical Sketch of Isaac King

Isaac King, of South Carolina, married Lydia Sitton, and settled in Tennessee. Their children were Joshua, Abraham, Sarah, and Joseph. Joshua, Abraham, and Sarah settled in Lincoln County, Mo., in 1817. Joseph married Elizabeth Yates, and settled in Montgomery County, in 1823. They had six children Conrad, Isaac, John, Charles, and Sarah. Mr. King built a horse mill, which was run principally by his wife. He took a great deal of interest in politics, and was elected Justice of the Peace and Captain of...

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Biographical Sketch of Richard W. King

(Ward)—Richard Willey, son of Judge Benjamin Cooper and Abbie (Kadle) King was born August 1, 1871, educated at Tahlequah and Male Seminary. Married July 20, 1890 Melvin Holland, born May 26, 1871. They were the parents of Benjamin Cooper born December 23, 1892, married at Tahlequah August 30, 1912 to Peggy Balleau born in 1894. Has one son, Richard Chester King, born Nov. 15, 1913. Clifford Willey, born Dec. 27, 1902 and John King, born April 1, 1910. Benjamin Cooper King was elected Judge of Tahlequah District, August 5, 1889-Richard Willey King was elected County Commissioner of the Third District of Cher­okee County on November 5, 1912. He is an Odd Fellow and Knight of Pythias. Benjamin Cooper King, Jr., is a Mason and Odd...

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Slave Narrative of Angie Boyce

Interviewer: Wm. R. Mays Person Interviewed: Angie Boyce Location: Franklin, Indiana Place of Birth: Adair County, KY Date of Birth: March 14, 1861 Place of Residence: 498 W. Madison St., Franklin, Ind. Wm. R. Mays Dist 4 Johnson Co. ANGIE BOYCE BORN IN SLAVERY, Mar. 14, 1861 on the Breeding Plantation, Adair Co. Ky. Mrs. Angie Boyce here makes mention of facts as outlined to her by her mother, Mrs. Margaret King, deceased. Mrs. Angie Boyce was born in slavery, Mar. 14, 1861, on the Breeding Plantation, Adair County, Kentucky. Her parents were Henry and Margaret King who belonged to James Breeding, a Methodist minister who was kind to all his slaves and no remembrance of his having ever struck one of them. It is said that the slaves were in constant dread of the Rebel soldiers and when they would hear of their coming they would hide the baby “Angie” and cover her over with leaves. The mother of Angie was married twice; the name of her first husband was Stines and that of her second husband was Henry King. It was Henry King who bought his and his wife’s freedom. He sent his wife and baby Angie to Indiana, but upon their arrival they were arrested and returned to Kentucky. They were placed in the Louisville jail and lodged in the same cell with large Brutal and...

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Slave Narrative of Julia King

Interviewer: K. Osthimer Person Interviewed: Julia King Date of Interview: June 10, 1937 Location: Toledo, Ohio Place of Residence: 731 Oakwood Avenue, Toledo, Ohio Age: (about) 80 K. Osthimer, Author Folklore: Stories From Ex-Slaves Lucas County, Dist. 9 Toledo, Ohio The Story of MRS. JULIA KING of Toledo, Ohio. Mrs. Julia King resides at 731 Oakwood Avenue, Toledo, Ohio. Although the records of the family births were destroyed by a fire years ago, Mrs. King places her age at about eighty years. Her husband, Albert King, who died two years ago, was the first Negro policeman employed on the Toledo police force. Mrs. King, whose hair is whitening with age, is a kind and motherly woman, small in stature, pleasing and quiet in conversation. She lives with her adopted daughter, Mrs. Elizabeth King Kimbrew, who works as an elevator operator at the Lasalle & Koch Co. Mrs. King walks with a limp and moves about with some difficulty. She was the first colored juvenile officer in Toledo, and worked for twenty years under Judges O’Donnell and Austin, the first three years as a volunteer without pay. Before her marriage, Mrs. King was Julia Ward. She was born in Louisville, Kentucky. Her parents Samuel and Matilda Ward, were slaves. She had one sister, Mary Ward, a year and a half older than herself. She related her story in her own...

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Slave Narrative of Martha King

Person Interviewed: Martha King Location: McAlester, Oklahoma Age: 85 They hung Jeff Davis to a sour apple tree! They hung Jeff Davis to a sour apple tree! They hung Jeff Davis to a sour apple tree! While we go marching on!” Dat was de song de Yankees sang when they marched by our house. They didn’t harm us in any way. I guess de war was over then ’cause a few days after dat old Master say, “Matt”. and I say. “Suh?” He say, “Come here. You go tall Henry I say come out here and to bring the rest of the niggers with him.” I went to the north door and I say, “Henry, Master Willis say ever one of you come out here.” We all went out side and line up in front of old Master. He say, “Henry”. Henry say, “Yes sah”. Old Master say, “Every one of you is free, as free as I am. You all can leave or stay ’round here if you want to.” We all stayed on for a long time ’cause we didn’t have no other home and didn’t know how to take keer of ourselves. We was kind of scared I reckon. Finally I heard my mother was in Walker County, Alabama, and I left and went to live with her. My mother was Harriet Davis and she was...

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Hodgen Cemetery, Hodgen, LeFlore County, Oklahoma


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