Surname: Hudson

Cattaraugus Indian Reservation Map and Occupants, 1890

The Cattaraugus Reservation, in Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, and Erie Counties, New York, as delineated on the map, occupies both sides of Cattaraugus creek. It is 9.5 miles long on a direct east and west line, averages 3 miles in width at the center, dropping at is eastern line an additional rectangle of 2 by 3 miles. A 6-mile strip on the north and 2 “mile blocks” at diagonal corners are occupied by white people, and litigation is pending as to their rights and responsibilities. The Seneca Nation claims that the permit or grant under which said lands were occupied and...

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Genealogy of George Spracklin

George Spracklin, son of Peter Spracklin and Elizabeth Andrews, continued living in Dudley Township, Hardin Co., Ohio. There he met Arloa Turner Minor and was married 9 April 1840, Knox Co., Ohio. In December of 1864 George bought land here in Shelby Co., Illinois in Drypoint Township. He paid $3680 for 200 acres south of Lakewood, Ill; in 1865, he and his family lived in Edwards County, Ill. before moving to Shelby County. By 1868 George owned 300 acres in Shelby County. Arloa, George’s wife, died in July, 1892 and is buried in Red Bank Cemetery, land formerly owned by George Spracklin. By the time George died in 1902, he had parceled out much of the land to his and Arloa’s children. He left an estate of 70 acres of land in Edwards County, Ill.; 70 acres of land in Shelby County, Ill., valued at $3750.00; one house and 6 lots in Lakewood Ill. and $3000 worth of personal property. His cash on hand at death was $617.50 with $1572.18 owed him in loans. On that record Peter J. Spracklin, a resident of Hardin Co., Ohio, 30 Dec. 1902, stated that he had cared for George Spracklin from January 1 to July 1, 1893. Some of his personal or household items were sold on Sept. 25, 1902. These items were: 1 table, 1 bed stead, 1 safe, 1 bureau, 1...

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Biographical Sketch of John Hudson

John Hudson and his wife, who was a Miss Allen, lived in North Carolina. They had six sons Isaac, Drury, Thomas, William, John, and Jesse. Drury and Isaac were in the revolutionary war. The latter settled in Georgia, where he married Polly Shipper. He afterward removed to South Carolina, and from thence, to Kentucky, and in 1818 he came to Missouri. The names of his children were Elizabeth, Nancy, Sally, John, Thomas, William, and Charles. Elizabeth married Lemuel Cox. Nancy married Garrett Ingram. Sally married James Owings. John was married three times; first to Lucinda Morris, of Kentucky; second to Nancy Holloway, and third to a widow lady named Carolina W. King. Thomas married Polly Hammond, and settled in Pike County. Charles and William married sisters, and settled in Lincoln County. William’s first wife died, and he afterward married Sarah...

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1867 Plymouth County Massachusetts Directory, Oil and Candle Manufacturers to Pump Makers

Oil and Candle Manufacturers  Judd L. S., Marion Organ Manufacturers Reynolds P., N. Bridgewater Marston A. B. Campello, Bridgewater Oysters and Refreshments (See Eating Houses) Nash J. E. Abington Douglas W. East Abington Gilman A. N., Bridgewater Fuller John, Bridgewater Hull J. C., Bridgewater Tripp B. F., Middleboro Union Saloon, Middleboro Grover R. B., No. Bridgewater Washburn and Richardson, No. Bridgewater Ballard S. D., Plymouth Dodge J. E., Plymouth Painters Carriage  Peirce Wm. M., Abington Ford B. F. East Abington Bates Asa, South Abington Hersey David A. Hingham Sprague Joseph T., Hingham Eldridge David, Kingston Boomer B. L., Middleboro Southworth Rodney E., Middleboro Sparrow J. G., North Bridge water Jones John B., North Bridge water Sargent Samuel, Bridge water Thomas William E., Bridge water Jones Charles L., Plymouth Young Charles, Scituate Young Edw., Scituate Painters (House and Sign) Davis W. H.. Abington French Joseph, Abington Ford B. F., East Abington Gilson L. C., East Abington Lawrence Thomas R., East Abington Lincoln S. B., North Abington Harding J. S., South Abington Beed Philip, South Abington Alden James S., Bridgewater Braman H. F. & J. G., Bridgewater Chandler Alden, Duxbury Hathaway Joshua W., Duxbury Sampson Alfred, Duxbury Grow & Wentworth, East Bridgewater Bonney E. P., Halifax Cook John, Halifax Bailey Melzer, Hanover Bryant Snow, Hanover Corbin Frank, Hanover Eells John P., Hanover Sturtevant George, Hanover Roberts John C., Hanson Cobb David, Hingham Cross and...

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Slave Narrative of Measy Hudson

Person Interviewed: Measy Hudson Location: Nashville, Tennessee Place of Birth: North Carolina Age: 79-80 Place of Residence: 1209 Jefferson St., Nashville, Tennessee “Wuz bawn’ in North Carolina en I’se 90 y’ars ole in November. W’en war broke out we kum ter Tennessee en hab bin ‘yer eber since. Wuz ‘yer w’en old Hood fi’rd de cannons. He said he wuz kum’n ‘yer ter Christmas dinnah, but he didn’t do hit.” “Mah white folks wuz named Harshaw. Marster Aaron Harshaw d’ed en we wuz willed ter his chilluns en dat we wuz not ter be whup’d er ‘bused in anyway. We wuz sold, but long ‘fore de war mah daddy wuz freed en mah manny wuz not freed, but kep’ a slave.” “De marster’s chilluns wuz small en eber New Y’ar Day, we wuz put on a block en hired out ter de high bidduh, en de money spent ter school de marster’s chilluns.” “I wuz tole dat sum ob de white peeples wuz so mean ter dere slaves dat de slaves would tek a pot en turn hit down in a hollow ter keep dere whites fum yearin’ dem singin’ en prayin’. De Ku Klux wuz bad on de ex-slaves at fust.” “De white folks ‘fore de war had w’at dey called “Muster” en I would go down wid dem. I would dance en de folks would gib me...

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Biographical Sketch of Robert Hudson Jr.

Hudson, Robert, jr., Vergennes, was born in Brandon, Vt., in 1850, and settled in Vergennes, Vt., in April, 1885, when he commenced his stove, tin, and plumbing business. He was married in 1877 to Bridget Ryan, of Orwell, Vt. Robert Hudson was a son of Robert and Eliza (McCadden) Hudson, who were born and married in Ireland, and settled in Brandon, Vt., in 1850. Robert Hudson enlisted in the Fifth Vermont Regiment in 1861, and was killed in the battle of the Wilderness, and buried on the field. He left a widow and eight children, six of whom are now living — Robert, Edward, James, Eliza, Mary A., and...

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Biography of C. C. Hudson

C. C. HUDSON. Many of the most active and enterprising residents of Newton County are natives of the same, and have here spent the greater part of their lives. In them we find men of true loyalty to the interests of this part of the State who understand as it were by instinct the needs, social and industrial, of this vicinity, and who have a thorough knowledge of its resources. They are, therefore, better adapted to succeed here than a stranger could be and are probably without exception warmly devoted to the prosperity of their native place. Mr. C. C. Hudson, a successful farmer and stockraiser of Jackson Township, Newton County, Arkansas, was born in this county, in 1858, and is a son of Samuel and Nancy (Billah) Hudson, both natives of Tennessee, the former born about 1811, and the later in 1818. When about seven years of age the father was brought by his parents to Lawrence County, Arkansas, and he there grew to mature years, married and made his home until 1832, when he came to what is now Newton County, Arkansas He cut his way through the unbroken forest, then inhabited by Indians and wild animals, and located on the creek that bears his name, three miles above Jasper, where he was the first white settler. He became one of the wealthiest and best known citizens...

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Biography of James S. Hudson

JAMES S. HUDSON. This gentleman is one of the substantial residents of Newton County, Arkansas, and is also one of the pioneers of the same, for he has resided here since his birth, which occurred on February 4, 1857. His uncle, Samuel Hudson, was the first white settler of the county, having come to this region in 1830, and his brother, Andrew Hudson, the father of James S., came here in 1835 from his native county of Jackson,Tennessee, where he was born in 1818. He settled on a farm about three miles west of where Jasper now is on Little Buffalo Creek, and so dense was the cane along that bottom that he was compelled to get out and cut a road through it. He lived on this farm for some years, but later moved to a farm one mile west of Jasper, on which his son William now resides, and where he died in the fall of 1891. He was quite successful in the accumulation of worldly goods, and was a substantial, law-abiding and public-spirited citizen. In his political views he always supported the principles of Democracy and at one time ably filled the office of county treasurer. Wild game was abundant when he first came to this section, and he and his brother Samuel became well known as hunters, for many were the deer and bears that...

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Biographical Sketch of Andrew J. Hudson

ANDREW J. HUDSON. Although Jackson Township, Newton County, Arkansas, is well known for the push, energy and enterprise of its farmers and stock-raisers, Andrew J. Hudson stands in the van in that direction, and through industrious and honorable efforts is now the owner of a good farm of 300 acres with 00 acres under cultivation. He is a native of this township, born December 14, 1853, and here grew to manhood and received his education. In the year 1875 he was married to Miss Mary M. Dupee, a native of Morgan County, Tennessee, and the daughter of William and Mariah Dupee, natives of Tennessee. The parents were married in the latter State, but about 1858 they came to Newton County, Arkansas, where Mrs. Dupee received her final summons. Mr. Dupee is still living and is a prominent farmer of Boone County. He is a worthy and earnest member of the Missionary Baptist Church and a man highly esteemed in the community. To Mr. and Mrs. Hudson have been born an interesting family of nine children: Nancy, William Samuel, Letha Penina, James Carroll, Columbus M., Wiley Andrew, John Floyd, Luella Ann and Grover Cleveland. After the war Mr. Hudson lived near Mount Parthenon for five years and then moved to his present farm where he has resided since. He is one of the most extensive farmers and stockraisers of the...

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Biographical Sketch of John P. Hudson

John P. Hudson is one of Champaign County’s most successful farm owners and farm managers. He is a young man, and for all his success to date has the best years of his life still before him. Mr. Hudson was born in Sidney Township of this county November 12, 1885, a son of Albert and Mary (Deer) Hudson. His father and mother were both natives of Champaign County and his father has been a very successful farmer and land owner, but is now living retired. The mother died in 1893. There were five children in the family: Elsie, wife of George Brash, of Decatur, Indiana; John Poke Hudson; Sophie, wife of Howard Rogers, of Gifford, Illinois; Robert, now deceased; and Jesse, of Homer, Illinois. John P. Hudson grew up on his father’s farm and had the advantages of the district schools. When he was twenty years of age he began farming as a renter on 200 acres, and after a successful experience there for two years went to Ohio and rented a 160 acre farm owned by his father. Mr. Hudson lived in Ohio five years and then returned to the home place, of which he manages 160 acres and rents eighty acres. In improvement and cultivation this ranks among the best kept farms in Champaign County. The Hudson home is on Rural Route No. 57 out of Sidney....

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Biography of Joseph Kennedy Hudson, General

Gen. Joseph Kennedy Hudson. One of the ablest soldiers of Kansas and most determined fighter for the free-state movement, the late General Hudson will have a lasting fame not only for what he did in the trying years of Kansas’ youth, but also as founder and for many years editor of the Topeka Capital. It was his resourcefulness as a practical newspaper man and his wonderful ability as an editor and molder of public opinion that gave the Capital its wide influence and standing as a journal, and the history of the Kansas Press had no more notable figure than Joseph Kennedy Hudson. It is not the purpose of this article to describe in detail the history of the Topeka Capital. That belongs to other pages. But something should be said of General Hudson’s personal relations with that journal and also of his ability and personality as an editor. It was in 1873 that he purchased the Kansas Farmer and moved it from Leavenworth to Topeka. He continued to edit and publish this paper until 1879. In March of the latter year he began the publication of the Topeka Daily Capital, now owned by Governor Capper. To the task of making a metropolitan daily paper with at least a state wide influence, General Hudson brought keen foresight, rare judgment, magnificent courage and a fund of energy and endurance that...

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Hudson, Edward – Obituary

In Union, December 16th, Edward Hudson, aged about 19 years Deceased was a very estimable young man highly esteemed and respected by a wide circle of friends. His disease was not considered dangerous until within a few days of his death and patient’s suddent taking off causes much surprise as well as sorrow. Mountain Sentinel, Union December 23,...

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Hudson, Otto – Obituary

The funeral services of the late Otto Hudson who died the latter part of last week, were held in the hall at Alicel last Friday, Rev. Parker of this city, conducted the services. The remains were interred in the Summerville cemetery. Deceased was 19 years, 5 months, and 21 days old and was a nephew of Samuel and Joe Hudson, of this city. Death resulted from rheumatism. Elgin Recorder Friday June 29,...

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Biographical Sketch of Jesse Hudson

Jesse Hudson, farmer and Justice of the Peace; P. O. Charleston; born in Jessamine Co., Ky., June 27, 1840, where he attended school until 11 years of age, when he emigrated to Illinois and located in East Oakland Tp. in October, 1851; here he remained and assisted his father in farming until upward of 20 years of age, when he raised one crop upon his father’s farm, of which he gave one-third for the use of the land; the following year he farmed upon rented land, and in 1864, he removed to Morgan Tp., where he rented land four years, and, in 1868, purchased his present place, where he has since continued to live; he first purchased eighty acres of land, mostly upon time, giving his notes for $2,180, which he met promptly, and has since added, by purchase, forty acres more, for which he paid $1,200 cash; he built a brick addition to his house in 1872, and, in 1877, erected the finest barn in Morgan Tp. The above property he has accumulated by his own hard labor, energy and good business management, in which he has been nobly assisted by his wife, to whom he was married Oct. 10, 1861; her maiden name was Harriet Stark; she was born in Indiana Nov. 15, 1842; they have two children now living, viz., Laura B., born Dec. 12, 1869,...

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