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Surname: Hopson

Captain Stewart, G. M. D. No. 655, Lagrange District

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Captain Stewart, G. M. D. No. 655, Lagrange District Adams, Absalom Adams, James M. Allums, Britton Amoss, James Barnes, William Bays, John R. Bays, Moses Bays, Nathaniel Boman, Isham Boman, Larkin Boman, Levi Boman, Robert Boman, William Brooks, Isaac R. Brooks, John Brooks, William Burson, Isaac C. Butler, Whitaker Cardwell, William Collum, James Crawley, Bird Crawley, Turner Culberson, David H. Culberson, James H. Culberson, Jeremiah C. Curry, James Daniel, James L. Daniel, William B. Day, Stephen Dennis, Peter Dickson, Thomas Dunn, Barney Ethredge, Bryant Ethridge, Zachariah Funderburk, Washington Furgison, Burrell Gibson, Churchill Gibson, William Glenn, James Gresham, Davis E. Grizzle, Kinchen Guyse, Joel Harbuck, Henry, Sr. Harbuck, Henry, Jr. Harbuck, William Hendon, Henry T. Hicks, Jacob Hicks, Littleberry Hicks, Nathaniel Holmes, Benjamin Holt, William Hopson, William Horton, Jeremiah Jackson, Thomas Jenkins, John Jenkins, Robert Jennings, Robert M. Johnson, Lewis Johnson, Mordecai Jones, Willie Keeth, James M. Kilgore, Robert Kilgore, William Kirkland, John Kolb, Jonathan Latimer, Samuel M. Layton, Thomas S. Lewis, Henry. Lipham, John McCullars, Andrew McPost, Lindsey Mays, James Mays, Robert Meadows, Simeon Meadows, Vincent Miller, John C. Mobley, William Moran, Jesse Moran, William J. Morgan, Wilson Norman, Jeremiah Pace, Noel Patterson, James Patterson, John, Jr. Patterson, Thomas Patterson, William Peppin, Noah Phipps, Thomas Poe, Gilbert Poe, Jonathan Poe, Solomon Post, John B. Post, Samuel...

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Hutchinson Family of Norwich Vermont

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Hutchinson is an old and numerous family in Norwich, as well as in other parts of the country. They were among the early settlers of Massachusetts and were in Lynn and Salem in that colony as early as 1628, or 1629. A descendant of these early colonists, named Abijah, who was a tailor, removed from Salem to Windham early in the eighteenth century. His son Samuel, born about 1719, in company with his son, John, came to Norwich in 1765. They cleared an island in the Connecticut River, opposite the present residency of John W. Loveland, and planted it with corn. In the fall of that year they returned to Connecticut, and in company with a younger son, Samuel, returned in the spring of 1766, and made a permanent settlement. The elder Samuel spent the remainder of his life in the town, and died February 8, 1809. His wife was Jemina Dunham; she died January 12, 1798. Besides the two sons named above, he had three daughters: Sarah, married Francis Smalley; Tabitha, married Jonathan Delano; Jerusha, married Nathan Roberts. They all died young,’ soon after marriage. Hutchinson, John, son of Samuel, was born in 1741, in Windham, Connecticut, and married Mary Wilson, who was born in Ashford, Connecticut, in August, 1744. He enlisted in the Continental...

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Migration of Families out of Norwich VT

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now At the first enumeration of the inhabitants of eastern Vermont, as made by the authority of New York in 1771, Norwich was found to be the most populous of all the towns of Windsor County, having forty families and 206 inhabitants. Windsor followed with 203, and Hartford was third with 190. The aggregate population of the county (ten towns reported) was then but 1,205, mostly confined to the first and second tiers of towns west of the Connecticut River. Twenty years later, in 1791, Hartland led all the towns of the county with 1,652 inhabitants, Woodstock and Windsor coming next with 1,605 and 1,542 respectively. Exceptional causes made the little town of Guilford (now numbering scarcely more than one thousand inhabitants), till after the year 1800, the most populous town in the state. In Norwich, the great falling off in the size of families in recent years is seen in the fact, that in the year 1800, the number of children of school age was 604, out of a total population of 1,486, while in 1880 with a nearly equal population (1,471) it was but 390. In the removal of large numbers of the native-born inhabitants by emigration, we must find the principal cause of the decline of our rural population. Preeminently is this true of...

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Norwich Vermont in the Civil War

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now During the four years of war for the suppression of the Rebellion, Norwich furnished 178 different men for the armies of the Union. There were seven re-enlistments, making the whole number of soldiers credited to the town 185. By the census of 1860, the number of inhabitants was 1759. It appears, therefore, that the town sent to the seat of war rather more than one in ten of its entire population, during the four years’ continuance of hostilities. About the same proportion holds good for the state at large, Vermont contributing, out of an aggregate population of 315,116, soldiers to the number of 34,555 for the defense of the Union. Of the 178 men enlisting from Norwich, twenty-seven laid down their young lives in the service of the country. The soil of every southern state, from the Potomac to the Rio Grande, was moistened by the blood or supplied a grave to one or more of these. The town paid the larger part of these men liberal bounties, amounting to about $32,000, in addition to their state and government pay. All calls for men upon the town by the national authorities were promptly and fully met. The patriotic response of our people to the expenses and sacrifices of the war was, in general, hearty and emphatic;...

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Norwich Vermont in the Revolutionary War

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The sources of information in regard to the part taken by the town in the Revolutionary struggle are few and scanty. The earliest allusion in the town records to this important epoch of the country’s history is found in the election of a Committee of Safety at the annual town meeting, March 11, 1777. This committee was five in number: Deacon Joseph Smalley, Samuel Hutchinson, John Hatch, Captain Hezekiah Johnson and John Hopson. There is much reason to believe, however, that this was not the first Committee of Safety that acted for the town; but was a new committee selected to conform to a recommendation made to the towns in Cumberland and Gloucester Counties by the Convention at Westminster which declared the independence of Vermont the preceding January. 1Governor and Council, Vol. I, p. 47. It is pretty certain that a company of militia was organized in Norwich as early as the year 1774 or 1775. Of this company Peter Olcott was chosen Captain and Thomas Murdock, Ensign, doubtless by the votes of the men enrolled in the same. The company was probably a purely voluntary organization of patriotic young men, in Colonel Seth Warner‘s regiment of Rangers in 1775, in the continental service. Colonel Timothy Bedell, of Haverhill, N. H., also raised a regiment the...

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Church History of Norwich Vermont

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The great achievement of the first generation of Norwich settlers was the building of a meeting house. More than any other event of the time, with the possible exception of the accomplishment of the national independence, this was an undertaking that enlisted the energies and taxed the resources of our forefathers. The building of a meeting house in a New England frontier settlement a century ago was regarded a matter of public concern, to be supported by the whole community without regard to sect or party, like the opening of roads or any other public charge. In less than ten years from the time the first clearing was made in Norwich, the preliminary steps were taken to provide a meeting house to be used for the accommodation of the whole people in the public worship of God. The question of the location of this building was sharply agitated, re-resulting in a keen competition between different sections of the town for the coveted distinction, inasmuch as the location of the house was supposed to fix the site of a possible future village where much of the business of the town would be transacted. When it became apparent that no agreement could be reached, a locating committee of three men from out of town was chosen and summoned...

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List of the Principal Pioneer Settlers in Norwich Vermont

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The counties of Cumberland and Gloucester had been organized by New York in 1766, out of the territory lying between the Green Mountains and Connecticut River. In the year 1771 a census of these counties was made under the authority of that province. All the towns in Windham and Windsor Counties, as now constituted, belonged to Cumberland County; the remaining portion of the state to the north-ward, then mostly unsettled, was called the county of Gloucester. 1In the first organization of eastern Vermont into counties by New York, Norwich belonged to Cumberland County. In March, 1772, a change of boundary was made which placed the town in Gloucester County. In the new division, which was thenceforth maintained, the north line of the county of Cumberland began at the southwest corner of Royalton, and ran thence on a course of South 60 degrees East to Connecticut River. By the census of 1771, the population of the two counties of Cumberland and Gloucester was returned as 4669, (Cumberland, 3947; Gloucester, 722). Norwich was found to contain 206 people distributed among forty families. In this enumeration the inhabitants were classified as to age and sex only. The number of males above sixteen years of age was found to be 66, the number of females 48. The number of males...

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