Surname: Hopper

Washington County, Idaho Pioneer Honor Roll

In 1940 and 1943, a survey of everyone who had lived in Washington County, Idaho continuously for 50 years or more, was made by the Weiser American. These pioneer residents were especially honored at the Fall Festival held in the fall of both years. So far as is known, the list compiled by the survey is complete and perhaps the only record of its kind in existence.

Read More

Slave Narrative of Andrew Moss

Person Interviewed: Andrew Moss Location: Knoxville, Tennessee Place of Birth: Wilkes County, Georgia Date of Birth: 1852 “One ting dat’s all wrong wid dis world today,” according to Andrew Moss, aged negro, as he sits through the winter days before an open grate fire in his cabin, with his long, lean fingers clasped over his crossed knees, “is dat dey ain no ‘prayer grounds’. Down in Georgia whar I was born,-dat was ‘way back in 1852,-us colored folks had prayer grounds. My Mammy’s was a ole twisted thick-rooted muscadine bush. She’d go in dar and pray for deliverance of de slaves. Some colored folks cleaned out knee-spots in de cane breaks. Cane you know, grows high and thick, and colored folks could hide de’seves in dar, an nobody could see an pester em.” “You see it was jes like dis. Durin’ de war, an befo de war too, white folks make a heap o fun of de colored folks for alltime prayin. Sometime, say, you was a slave en you git down to pray in de field or by de side of de road. White Marster come ‘long and see a slave on his knees. He say, ‘What you prayin’ ’bout?’ An you say, ‘Oh, Marster I’se jes prayin’ to Jesus cause I wants to go to Heaven when I dies.’ An Marster say, ‘Youse my negro. I git...

Read More

Biography of Capt. James T. Hopper

CAPT. JAMES T. HOPPER. This gentleman is one of the very oldest residents of Boone County, Arkansas, and resided in this vicinity long before such a town as Harrison was thought of. He is a product of Warren County, Tennessee, his birth occurring on his parents’ farm, January 3, 1832. The fifth in a family of nine children born to Moses and Rebecca (Hicks) Hopper, the former of whom was born in Kentucky in 1802, his father, Gillum Hopper being of English birth. Upon coming to this country he settled first in Virginia, then in North Carolina, then in Kentucky, and finally in Tennessee. He was a Democrat, as was also Moses Hopper, and the latter was, like his father, a tiller of the soil. He was a man of education, was liberal, generous and high-minded, and prior to his death, which occurred in 1862, he became possessed of a comfortable competency. He was killed by bushrangers near Harrison, in Boone County, Arkansas, on account of his Union principles, although he took no active part in the war. He was very charitably inclined, and is still gratefully remembered by many a poor man whom he generously assisted along the hard pathway of life. He came thither from Tennessee in 1851, and made a good home one mile north of Harrison. His wife was a daughter of A. Hicks, a...

Read More

Biography of Capt. Gillum Hopper

CAPT. GILLUM HOPPER. There is no greater pleasure for the hand and pen of the historian or biographer to perform than in recording the life and achievements of a man who, through his own unaided efforts, has secured a comfortable competency and the general acknowledgment of being an honest man and esteemed citizen. Gillum Hopper, whose success in life is the result of honesty, industry and good management on his part, first saw the light in Warren County, Tennessee, in 1841. His parents, Moses and Rebecca (Hicks) Hopper, were natives of Kentucky and Tennessee, respectively, the former born in 1802 and the latter in 1804. When a lad Moses went with his parents to Tennessee, grew to manhood there, and was married in Cannon County, that State to Miss Hicks. Afterward they located in Warren County, Tennessee, and there all their children were born. In 1851 they moved to what is now Boone County, Arkansas, and settled in the woods, one mile northwest of the present town of Harrison. There the father tilled the soil until 1862, when he was killed by bushwhackers, on the farm where our subject now resides. He was a Union man and opposed to secession, but took no part in the war. He was one of the pioneers of this section and an extensive stock trader. When he first settled in Boone County it...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Dudley Hopper

Dudley Hopper, farmer; P. Q. Mattoon; one of the first settlers of Coles Co.; was born in Knox Co., Ky., Aug. 18, 1826; came to this State with his father’s family in 1837, when he was but a boy. He was married to Miss Jane Dixon, now deceased; they have had four children, viz., Felitha, George, Harvey and Matilda. Mr. Hopper was married the second time to Miss Margaret Easter. His farm consists of 330 acres, valued at $9,900; since his residence in the township, he has held the office of Commissioner three years. He was a participant in the Mexican war, where he served eighteen months. His land, on which he now resides, was partially entered by himself from the...

Read More


Free Genealogy Archives

It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest