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Surname: Hooker

Ancestors of John Richardson Bronson of Attleboro, MA

JOHN RICHARDSON BRONSON, M. D., who for over half a century was one of the best known practitioners of medicine in southern Massachusetts and part of Rhode Island, and who for upward of fifty years was a resident of Attleboro, was a native of Connecticut, born in the town of Middlebury, New Haven county, June 5, 1829, son of Garry and Maria (Richardson) Bronson.

The Bronson family was early planted in the New World. John Bronson (early of record as Brownson and Brunson) was early at Hartford. He is believed, though not certainly known, to have been one of the company who came in 1636 with Mr. Hooker, of whose church he was a member. He was a soldier in the Pequot battle of 1637. He is not named among the proprietors of Hartford in the land division of 1639; but is mentioned in the same year in the list of settlers, who by the “towne’s courtesie” had liberty “to fetch woods and keepe swine or cowes on the common.” His house lot was in the “soldiers’ field,” so called, in the north part of the old village of Hartford, on the “Neck Road” (supposed to have been given for service in the Pequot war), where he lived in 1640. He moved, about 1641 to Tunxis (Farmington) He was deputy from Farmington in May, 1651, and at several subsequent sessions, and the “constable of Farmington” in 1652. He was one of the seven pillars at the organization of the Farmington Church in 1652. His name is on the list of freemen of Farmington in 1669. He died Nov. 28, 1680.

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Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

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Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

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Biographies of Western Nebraska

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now These biographies are of men prominent in the building of western Nebraska. These men settled in Cheyenne, Box Butte, Deuel, Garden, Sioux, Kimball, Morrill, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Dawes counties. A group of counties often called the panhandle of Nebraska. The History Of Western Nebraska & It’s People is a trustworthy history of the days of exploration and discovery, of the pioneer sacrifices and settlements, of the life and organization of the territory of Nebraska, of the first fifty years of statehood and progress, and...

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Collections of the Connecticut Historical Society

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now From 1860 to 1930 The Connecticut Historical Society published a series containing items from their collection of historical documents. The following are the 24 volumes of their works freely made available online. To assist the researcher with determining the contents for each volume, we’ve included such in the description. Connecticut genealogists will want to pay particular attention to Volumes 8-10, 12, 14, and 22. Willis and Wyllys family researchers, who descend from George Wyllys will be ecstatic over volume 21. And to our Native American friends,...

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1921 Farmers’ Directory of Viola Iowa

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Allen, Charles F. Wf. Libbie; ch. Ray and Fred. P. O. Gray, R. 1. O. 468.64 ac., sec. 7. (40.) Allen, R. L. Wf. Laura. P. O. Gray, R. 1. R. 160ac., sec. 7. (20.) Owner, Chas. F. Allen. Anderson, Charles. Ch. Jennie, Fred, Frank and John. P. O. Coon Rapids, R. 3. O. 298.41 ac., sec. 1;O. 40 ac., sec. 12. (27.) Anderson, D. B. Wf....

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Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

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Biographical Sketch of George P. Hooker

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now George P. Hooker, son of the venerable Henry Hooker, born May 3 1820, married Lucretia J. Ashcroft, October 25, 1843, and settled upon the farm he now occupies in 1849. He began life without any means, but with habits of industry and sterling integrity combined with sound judgment. the time he settled here this farm contained only fourteen acres of tillable land, and his barn, a structure 24×34 feet, was sufficiently large to store crops. Without adding anything to the size of his farm, however, he added to the capacity of his barn till the structure is 40×100 feet, eighteen, feet posts, and is scarcely large enough to accommodate his crops. Forty acres of his farm when he came here was a bog swamp, producing nothing; but by judicious underdraining, for which purpose he has used several carloads of drain tile, it is fully reclaimed. This enterprise he has carried out in all his farm details, resulting in a fine place and making him a rich farmer. Mr. and Mrs. Hooker are the parents of four children, viz.: Della L., who married S. W. Puffer, and resides in Chester, Vt.; Cassius M., who married, and owns a cattle ranch in Arizona; Augusta, who married W. N. Pike, and resides in Wendell,...

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Biography of Henry Hooker

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Rev. John Hooker, born March 28, 1729, ordained pastor of the Congregational church of Northfield, Mass., was the father of Seth Hooker, who was born October 22. 1759. The latter married Abigail Gay, daughter of Rev. Bunker Gay, May 5, 1789, and settled on the farm of his wife’s father, in Hinsdale, where he continued to reside until his death, May 31, 1844, aged eighty-four years. His children were Sally Gay, born December 25, 1789 and died January 12, 1797. Henry, born July 5, 1791, in Charlestown, N. H.. married Mary Dagget, of Westmoreland, October 23, 1816. In early life he learned the trade of carriage making, and later settled on the homestead and pursued both farming and carriage making, but still later in life he discontinued his trade and gave his whole attention to his farm. He is now living in the house where he was born, at the great age of ninety-three years, though in feeble health. Mrs. Hooker died August 18, 1864. Abigail Prentice Hooker, born August 28, 1792, married, first, Willard Blanchard, November 21, 1811, and second, Caleb Todd, July 10, 1828. George, born December 15, 1794, married Minerva Taylor, January 1o, 1819, and died in 1858, Sally Gay Hooker, born June 22, 1797, married Elihu Stebbins, November 11, 1824, and died...

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Roy Andrew Hooker

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Private., Inf., Co. E, 119th Regt. Inf., 30th Div.; of Stoneville, N.C.; son of G. R. and Mrs. R. A. Hooker. Entered service Sept. 1, 1917, at Concord, N.C. Sent to Camp Sevier, S. C. Transferred to Ft. Jay, N. Y., then to Des Moines, Iowa. Now at Douglas, Arizona. Mrs. Hooker has sent three sons to fight for USA, one in navy two in the...

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Hooker, Frances Harriet – Obituary

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Union, Oregon Frances Harriet Hooker, 92, of La Grande and formerly of Union, died April 4 at a local care home in La Grande. A life tribute and celebration will begin at 3 p.m. Friday at the Union Cemetery in Union. Loveland Funeral Chapel & Crematory is in charge of arrangements. Through the last 92 years, those who knew Frances say she touched many lives and helped many people as a volunteer at senior meals and the local food bank at the United Methodist Church in Union. She was usually the first one at church on Sundays and would turn up the heat, start the coffee and help where she could. Frances was born Jan. 21, 1916, the third of seven children to Frank John and Edith Anna Haltby Cole Wilsey in Flora. She spent much of her childhood in Lewiston, Idaho, and Clarkston, Wash. She is the descendant of an early pioneer family, her grandparents, George Warren and Mary Ann Skelton Cole. On March 23, 1932, Frances married William Guy Hooker in Goldendale, Wash. Frances and Bill lived in Lewiston for a year before moving to Pondosa, where Bill worked for the mill for 21 years. Frances and her family then moved to Union in 1958, where she led an active life and remained in...

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Grover Monroe Hooker

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Gunner’s Mate, 1st Class. Son of G. R. and R. A. Hooker, of Stoneville, N.C. Husband of Fannie B. Hooker. Entered service December 7, 1915, at El Paso, Texas. Went to training station, San Francisco, Cal. On the U. S. S. Maryland, U. S. S. South Dakota, U. S. Naval Base 17 and 18, U. S. S. Eagle 56, R. S. Portsmouth, N. H. Three trips on convoy. Was stationed overseas one year. Stationed around South American coast 11 months. Prior to enlistment in Navy, served in the U. S. Army, stationed at the Philippines, September 24, 1912, to September 16, 1914. Mustered out December 15, 1919, U. S. R. Ship, Portsmouth, N....

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George R. Hooker

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now 1st Class Private, Co. B, 42nd Div., 117th T. H. and M. P. Son of G. R. and R. A. Hooker, of Stoneville, N.C. Husband of Ollie Stafford Hooker. Entered service April 24, 1917, at Lynchburg, Va. Was sent to Ft. Monroe, Va.; transferred to Camp Elberta, Ill., then to Long Island, N. Y. Sent overseas Jan. 23, 1918; landed Feb. 2, 1918. Operations in Loneville Sector, in Baccerest, St. Clement, Champagne-Marne Defensive, Aisne Marne Offensive, St. Mihiel; operations between Meuse and Mozelle, Meuse-Argonne offensive; was through Germany four months. Two citations; gold chevrons Jan. 23, 1919. Landed in USA April 25, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Meade, Md., May 15,...

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Biographical Sketch of Major W. F. Hooker

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now MAJOR W.F. HOOKER. – This leading citizen of Eastern Washington, whose capacity for public affairs, and whose independence in politics, have become proverbial, is a native of the Palmetto state, having been born at Hookerton, Green county, North Carolina, in 1835. Like all true Southerners, he is proud of his ancestry, his father having been a captain in the war of 1812 and twice a member of the legislature of North Carolina, and a member of the convention which formed the constitution of that state. Young Hooker was educated at Wake-forest College in his native state, and at the age of twenty-two was married to Miss Mary Williams, a graduate of the Salem High School of the same county. He moved to Southern Georgia soon after his marriage, and went into the manufacture of staves and lumber. His business was broken up by the Civil war; and, removing to Florida, he employed himself in farming until 1880. The Southern country, however, was uncongenial; and he sought a place of somewhat larger ideas and opportunities. He sent three of his children ahead to Washington Territory in the year last-named, and, remaining in order to realize upon the sale of his property, came with his wife and two remaining children to Cheney in 1882. Since his arrival he...

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