Surname: Holman

Holman Family of Attleboro Massachusetts

For something more than two centuries the Holman family of which the Attleboro Holmans are a branch has been identified with the history of this Commonwealth, and for half of that period the Holmans have been people of distinction in the town just named, closely identified with its social, religious, educational and business life. The progenitor of this Massachusetts Holman family, Solomon Holman, with his brother John, is said to have come from the Bermuda Islands to Newburyport, the family tradition being that the Holman family came from Wales to the Bermuda Islands some time between 1670 and 1690; that the two named were seized by a press-gang and brought to this country and escaped from a British ship at Newburyport; that John, the youngest, went to North Carolina and Solomon settled in Newbury. Coffin’s Newbury says Solomon Holman and wife came there about 1693 or 1694.

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Holman Family of Attleboro, MA

For something more than two centuries the Holman family of which the Attleboro Holmans are a branch has been identified with the history of this Commonwealth, and for half of that period the Holmans have been people of distinction in the town just named, closely identified with its social, religious, educational and business life.

The progenitor of this Massachusetts Holman family, Solomon Holman, with his brother John, is said to have come from the Bermuda Islands to Newburyport, the family tradition being that the Holman family came from Wales to the Bermuda Islands some time between 1670 and 1690; that the two named were seized by a press-gang and brought to this country and escaped from a British ship at Newburyport; that John, the youngest, went to North Carolina and Solomon settled in Newbury. Coffin’s Newbury says Solomon Holman and wife came there about 1693 or 1694. Solomon Holman married Mary Barton and their twelve children were:

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Descendants of Rev. George Shove of Fall River, MA

SHOVE. Rev. George Shove, gentleman, son of Margery, who was admitted to the church at Boston as a widow in 1638, and who subsequently was of Rowley and a proprietor and still later of Roxbury, where she married in 1654 Richard Peacock, became the third minister of Taunton, ordained Nov. 17, 1665. Of his ministerial life little is known except that be “preached acceptably,” and taught the Taunton school; and it is said that “no rumor of strife or discord in connection with him comes down to us.” His fame, however, as a land bolder and dealer in real estate bas not failed to reach us. He is represented as having been largely concerned in the secular transactions of the town and possessed of considerable wealth. He was one of the six original proprietors of Assonet Neck, when that purchase was made in 1680. His home lot was that of William Phillips, one of the first settlers on the east side of what is now High street, between Cohannet and Winthrop streets. On July 14, 1664, Mr. Shove married Hopestill, daughter of Rev. Samuel Newman, a learned man, the distinguished minister of Rehoboth. She died March 7, 1673, and he married Feb. 17, 1674-75, Mrs. Hannah Walley. She died in September, 1685, and he married Dec. 3, 1686, Mrs. Sarah Farwell. He died April 21, 1687. His mother Margery...

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History of Kossuth, Hancock, and Winnebago Counties, Iowa

History of Kossuth, Hancock, and Winnebago Counties, Iowa together with sketches of their cities, villages and townships, educational, civil, military and political history; portraits of prominent persons, and 641 biographies of representative citizens. Also included is a history of Iowa embracing accounts of the pre-historic races, and a brief review of its civil and military history.

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Claybank Cemetery Ozark Alabama

Margaret Claybank Cemetery is located about two miles from Ozark, Alabama on Ozark – Daleville Highway. This cemetery enumeration was performed in 1948 by Eustus Hayes and as such will provide details on headstones which may no longer be present in the cemetery. Lizzie E. Dowling June 25, 1853 – Oct 31, 1938. Wife of N. B. Dowling. N. B. Dowling Aug 15, 1853 – Mar 28, 1938. Hus of Lizzie E. Dowling. Leila Belle Dowling May 26, 1876 – Jan 14, 1933. Dau of S. L. & Sarah Jane Dowling. Samuel L. Dowling Nov 3, 1841 – Jan...

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Biographical Sketch of David Holman

David Holman settled in Chesterfield about 1805, married twice, first, Mehitable Gale, and second, Mrs. Laura (Stone) Henry. He had two children, James, an adopted son, and Ella F. The former married Mary Falkner in 1824, who died August 31, 1841. He died April 28, 1844, aged thirtyfive years. His children were David, Hetta, William, Jason R., Sarah J., Esther M., Cynthia, George and Henry M. David, son of James, was born January 5, 1825, and married Sarah R., daughter of Ara Hamilton, April 27, 1848. He was selectman in 1879 and 1882. His children are Frederick H., Alice M., Evelyn A., and Gertrude,L. William, son of James, was born August 2, 1828, married Mary M., daughter of Josiah Higgins, April 8, 1851, and has children as follows: Mary Rosetta, born May 5, 1853; Frank M., born December 30, 1854; Frederick W., born September 30, 1856; George A., born October 26, 1858; and Helen L., born March 6, 1861, who died August 3,...

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Biography of Charles Leavitt Holman

There are few business enterprises that so closely touch the comfort and welfare as that which has to do with the lighting of homes and business houses, and the man who is active in control of public utilities must be one of broad vision, of thorough understanding of needs and conditions and of marked enterprise that he may keep in touch with the changing times. Possessing all these requisites, Charles Leavitt Holman has steadily advanced since he became connected with the Laclede Gas Light Company of St. Louis in April, 1903. He was advanced through various positions to tile presidency on the 1st of March, 1912, and then when it became necessary to have governmeir control over fuel and light because of tile exigencies brought about by the war, Mr. Holman did effective service in this connection. He has made himself master of every phase of the business, acquainting himself with the various details of gas manufacture and distribution as well as with tile principal elements of successful control of a business of this nature. He was born at Lawrence, Kansas, July 4, 18711, and throughout his life has manifested the spirit of western enterprise and progress. His parents were James E. and Libbie I. Sherwood) HOLMAN and under the parental roof he remained while pursuing his education in tile public schools of the Sunflower state. He started out...

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Biography of John A. Holman

JOHN A. HOLMAN. – To the esteemed and enterprising citizen who is named above we are constrained to accord a representation in this volume since he has wrought with vigor and intelligence for the development of this county, and stands today one of its leading and substantial agriculturists and stockmen. Mr. Holman was born in Tortuna, Vestmanland, Sweden, on December 8, 1857, the rural districts being his home. He received a good education attending school regularly nine months each year for a period of seven years. Then he gave his whole attention to assisting his father on the farm, and when he had reached his majority, engaged with a neighbor for six months, receiving as a remuneration for this service, one hundred kroner, equal to about twenty-seven dollars of our money. He served another six months on his father’s farm and then, being twenty-two years of age, he embarked for America, settling first in Kansas City, Kansas, whence, six months later, he went to Sandy, Utah, making his home in that vicinity for four years. In 1880 his father came to this country, bought a farm in Salt Lake county, ten miles south from Salt Lake City, and our subject rented the same, continuing in that capacity for three years. Then he went to Roseburg, Idaho, and settled on a fraction of school land, whence, in 1885, having sold...

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Holman, Ernest Mrs.

Mrs. Ernest Holman Drowned Touchet River Flood In Washington Claims Victim Falls from Plank and Husband Falls to Reach Her Side Struggle In Raging Torrent Victim is Sister-in-law of Mrs. George T. Ballard Of North Powder Mrs. George T. Ballard left Monday night for Dayton, Washington, where she was called by the tragic death of her sister-in-law, Mrs. Ernest Holman, which occurred Monday afternoon. Mrs. Holman, pioneer resident of Columbia county, was drowned in the high waters of the Touchet river Monday afternoon. A new detour bridge is being built to replace the one swept out by the Thursday night floods and a plank 36 feet long had been placed from the end of the span to the bank to allow workmen to go to lunch. Mr. and Mrs. Holman, returning home from a trip to town, attempted to cross the plank over the deepest and ugliest part of the swollen stream. Mrs. Holman became giddy, missed her footing and plunged into the water. Mr. Holman jumped after her and both regained their feet. Mr. Holman was swept about 50 feet down stream, but reached the bank and returned to the place Mrs. Holman was clinging to a clump of willows just as the current carried her from view. The stream was combed until 3 p.m. when the body was found lodged nearly a mile below the bridge. Mrs....

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Holman, Lorenzil Claude – Obituary

Richland, Oregon L. C. Holman dies today at Richland Lorenzil Claude Holman, 71, prominent Eagle valley farmer, Richland postmaster and former Baker county commissioner, died this morning at his home at Richland after a short illness. The funeral will be held Sunday at 2:30 p.m. at the Richland Methodist church with the Rev. Berl Thomas officiating and the Beatty chapel in charge of arrangements. Interment will be in Eagle valley cemetery. Mr. Holman was born August 3, 1880 in Xenia, Illinois. He moved to Pine valley at the age of six and to Cove when he was eight years old. When he was 22 he came to Eagle valley where he lived since that time. He was married to Hettie Ownby on May 9, 1915. He served as county commissioner for six years from 1934 to 1940. Since 1940 he has been postmaster at Richland. He leaves a widow, Mrs. Hettie Holman of Richland; two daughters, Mrs. Obie Simonis of Baker and Mrs. Avon Duby of Keating; a brother, Clarence Holman of Baker; a twin sister, Maude Mickey of Vancouver, Washington, and another sister, Mrs. Ethel Lively of Tucson, Arizona; four grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Source: Baker Democrat Herald, Baker City, Oregon, June 7, 1951, page 1 Contributed by: Sue...

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Biography of Joseph Holman

JOSEPH HOLMAN. – This pioneer of the North Pacific was born in Devonshire, England, in 1817, and came to the United States when nineteen years of age. Three years later he was at Peoria, Illinois, at which place he listened to a lecture on Oregon by Reverend Jason Lee, and was one of the party organized to cross the plains which left early in the spring of 1839, reaching the Willamette after fourteen months of travel, toil, hardships and privation. Many of the incidents of his trip are mentioned in the biographical sketch of Francis Fletcher in this book, he being one of the party of four that remained together during the entire trip to Oregon Territory. The party that left Peoria consisted of sixteen, all of whom but four became dissatisfied upon reaching the junction of the Fort Bent and Santa Fé roads, and turned off upon the later. Holman’s party of four was determined to come on to Oregon, and adopted a motto, “Oregon or the Grave;” and Oregon it was. The three companions of Holman were Francis Fletcher, Amos Cook and R. Kilborne. They reached Brown’s Hole on Green river, where they wintered with Doctor Newell, chief trader of the Hudson’s Bay Company, and the Indians, leaving early in February for Fort Hall, where they arrived after two months of desperate traveling over a route that...

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Biography of James Duval Holman

James Duval Holman was born in August 18, 1814, on his father’s farm in Woodford county, Kentucky. He was of the Holman family so well known in the Southern and Middle States. His mother was a Duval of Hugenot descent, a family of equal position with the Holmans in the south. Of Mr. Holman’s great-grand parents, three came from Virginia and one from North Carolina. His parents were John and Betsy L. Holman, who were married in October, 1810. In 1817 they moved to Tennessee, where they resided for nine years, when they moved to Clay county, Missouri. His mother died in 1841, and his father came to Oregon in the immigration of 1843. In August, 1840, James D. Holman married Rachael Hixson Summers of Fleming county, Kentucky, who survives him, and now (1890), is living at Portland. Her family is well known, particularly in Kentucky, and is closely related to the Hixson, Mason and Morris families of that State. She was born February 27, 1823, in Fleming county, Kentucky, and in 1840 accompanied her father, Thomas Summers, on a trip to Western Missouri, which he took for his health. While there she met Mr. Holman. Soon after he reached manhood Mr. Holman engaged in mercantile business. During that period the large number of Mormons in this section of Missouri caused great trouble, and partly by reason of his...

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