Surname: Griswold

Ancestors of John Richardson Bronson of Attleboro, MA

JOHN RICHARDSON BRONSON, M. D., who for over half a century was one of the best known practitioners of medicine in southern Massachusetts and part of Rhode Island, and who for upward of fifty years was a resident of Attleboro, was a native of Connecticut, born in the town of Middlebury, New Haven county, June 5, 1829, son of Garry and Maria (Richardson) Bronson.

The Bronson family was early planted in the New World. John Bronson (early of record as Brownson and Brunson) was early at Hartford. He is believed, though not certainly known, to have been one of the company who came in 1636 with Mr. Hooker, of whose church he was a member. He was a soldier in the Pequot battle of 1637. He is not named among the proprietors of Hartford in the land division of 1639; but is mentioned in the same year in the list of settlers, who by the “towne’s courtesie” had liberty “to fetch woods and keepe swine or cowes on the common.” His house lot was in the “soldiers’ field,” so called, in the north part of the old village of Hartford, on the “Neck Road” (supposed to have been given for service in the Pequot war), where he lived in 1640. He moved, about 1641 to Tunxis (Farmington) He was deputy from Farmington in May, 1651, and at several subsequent sessions, and the “constable of Farmington” in 1652. He was one of the seven pillars at the organization of the Farmington Church in 1652. His name is on the list of freemen of Farmington in 1669. He died Nov. 28, 1680.

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Migration of Families out of Norwich VT

At the first enumeration of the inhabitants of eastern Vermont, as made by the authority of New York in 1771, Norwich was found to be the most populous of all the towns of Windsor County, having forty families and 206 inhabitants. Windsor followed with 203, and Hartford was third with 190. The aggregate population of the county (ten towns reported) was then but 1,205, mostly confined to the first and second tiers of towns west of the Connecticut River. Twenty years later, in 1791, Hartland led all the towns of the county with 1,652 inhabitants, Woodstock and Windsor coming next with 1,605 and 1,542 respectively. Exceptional causes made the little town of Guilford (now numbering scarcely more than one thousand inhabitants), till after the year 1800, the most populous town in the state. In Norwich, the great falling off in the size of families in recent years is seen in the fact, that in the year 1800, the number of children of school age was 604, out of a total population of 1,486, while in 1880 with a nearly equal population (1,471) it was but 390. In the removal of large numbers of the native-born inhabitants by emigration, we must find the principal cause of the decline of our rural population. Preeminently is this true of Norwich. The outflow of people began very early and now for more than...

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The Meeting in 1811 of Tecumseh and Apushamatahah

The meeting in 1811, of Tecumseh, the mighty Shawnee, with Apushamatahah, the intrepid Choctaw. I will here give a true narrative of an incident in the life of the great and noble Choctaw chief, Apushamatahah, as related by Colonel John Pitchlynn, a white man of sterling integrity, and who acted for many years as interpreter to the Choctaws for the United States Government, and who was an eye-witness to the thrilling scene, a similar one, never before nor afterwards befell the lot of a white man to witness, except that of Sam Dale, the great scout of General Andrew...

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1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George...

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Biographical Sketch of Benjamin Griswold

Benjamin Griswold came with his family to the town from the State of New York in 1787, locating on Bristol Flats, upon a part of the late Morgan estate. He remained only a few years, when he removed to Cambridge, Vt. His son Horace was the second child born in the...

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Biographical Sketch of Lester Griswold

Griswold, Lester, Orwell, was the second son of Griswold the pioneer, and was born on April 18, 1786. He was married to Lucinda Parks, a daughter of Asa Parks, also an early pioneer, and to them were born six children-William C., Lucretia L., Asa Parks, Olivia L., Emmitt Darwin, and Georgianna Augusta. Of these children Emmitt Darwin is one of the substantial men of Orwell, Vt., who believe in doing well whatever is worth doing at all. His farm is among the best, and is stocked with the choicest bloods. His cattle are thoroughbred “Jerseys; ” sheep of the finest wool Atwood Merinos, and horses all thoroughbred stock. He married Martha Conkey, of Orwell, Vt., and to them have been born two children-Gracie L. and Mary...

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Biography of David F. Griswold

David F. Griswold, city editor of the Racine Journal, has been connected with newspaper publication since beginning his independent career and now ranks among the leaders in that field in the city of Racine. His birth occurred here on the 26th of December, 1854, and he is a son of Nelson A. and Jane (Wilson) Griswold, who removed to this city in 1850. The father was a ship carpenter by trade and was employed in the construction of some of the first vessels built in Racine. He passed away in 1856 and his wife five years ago. David F. Griswold, or “Dave” Griswold, as he is familiarly called, was reared here and received his education in the public schools. When eighteen years old he began learning the printer’s trade in the office of the Racine Weekly Argus, but when the Daily Argus was established in 1880 changed to the office of the Racine Journal, working at the case until the Daily Journal was started, when he became its city editor. He has since held that position and has made an excellent record, gaining recognition in newspaper circles for the efficiency of his work. All local events of interest are fully and reliably reported in the Daily Journal and the excellence of its city news service is one of its strongest points. He is financially interested in the Racine Journal...

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Biographical Sketch of Frederick Griswold and Harvey Griswold

Harvey and Frederick Griswold, of Connecticut, were cousins. They emigrated to the West, and settled in (now) Warren County, Mo., at a very early date. Frederick married Rebecca Shobe, and opened the first store in Pinckney. They had no children. Harvey came to Missouri when he was only about sixteen years of age, and walked from St. Louis to Pinckney, carrying his wardrobe and all the property he possessed tied up in a cotton handkerchief. His cousin Frederick at first hired him to clerk in his store, but afterward bought a store at Marthasville, and sent him there to take charge of it. He subsequently purchased the store on his own account, and followed the mercantile business for many years, acquiring a comfortable fortune before his death. He married Mahala Shobe, a sister of Frederick Griswold’s wife, and they had sixteen children, only six of whom lived to be grown, viz: Rebecca, William, Sylvanus, Prudence, Angeline, and Frederick. Mr. Griswold owned the land on which the graves of Daniel Boone and his wife were situated, and he bitterly opposed the removal of the remains, but in vain. It was his intention to erect a monument over the graves, and otherwise beautify the last resting place of the old pioneer and his...

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Julia Ann Jones Todd Benson

BENSON, Julia Ann Jones Todd6, (Amos5, Charles4, Gideon3, Michael2, Christopher1) born Sept. 1, 1816, married Henry John Benson, of Painesville, then Waldoboro, Ohio. He later married Amanda Webb. Children: I. Henry Clay, m. Julia Harriet Stewart; he was a farmer at Upper Alton, Ill. II. Eleanor Todd, m. Hon. James Augustus Bates, of Chippewa Falls, Wis. III. Henrietta Maria, m. Alphonso M. Griswold, of Cincinnati, Ohio. IV. Alvarado Todd, m. Jeannie M. Wright; they lived at St. Louis, Mo. V. George Washington, he lived at St. Louis, Mo. VI. Rose. VII. John; he was a farmer at Rolla, Mo. VIII. Charles; he was a machinist at Providence, R....

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Elizabeth Charlotte Todd Brown of Waterbury CT

BROWN, Elizabeth Charlotte Todd7, (Oliver6, Samuel5, Christopher4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Sept. 1, 1810, married James, son of deacon (Col.) James and Lavina (Wilton) Brown, who was born July 2, 1815. He lived the later part of his life in Waterbury, Conn. He was a Representative and a Senator. Children: I. Frances Augusta, b. April 1, 1836, d. Jan. 19, 1837. II. Sarah Josephine, b. Sept. 30, 1839. III. Rosa Elizabeth, b. Nov. 25, 1849, m. Feb. 9, 1869, Richard Sell Griswold, of Lyme,...

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Carrie M. Todd Griswold

GRISWOLD, Carrie M. Todd8, (Caleb7, Bela6, Caleb5, Gideon4, Gideon3, Michael2, Christopher1) born Nov. 27, 1862, married July 8, 1880, Edgar L. Griswold, who was born June 8, 1858. Child: I. Harry M., b. June 4, 1884, m. Dec. 19, 1907, Bessie A....

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Biography of J. Louis Griswold, M. D.

J. Louis Griswold, M. D. During his long and active practice at Columbus, Doctor Griswold has become a recognized specialist in medical and surgical work, and has well earned a position among the foremost members of his profession in Cherokee County. Doctor Griswold has lived in this section of Kansas for more than thirty years, and was a druggist before taking up his studies and preparations for medicine. He was born on a farm in Bureau County, Illinois. His Griswold ancestors came originally from Wales and were colonial settlers in Connecticut. His grandfather, Willard Griswold, was born in Connecticut in 1776. He was the son of a soldier of the American Revolution, and other members of the family were also represented in the patriot armies. Willard Griswold became a pioneer farmer in the State of Iowa, where he died in 1874. Hubbard Griswold, father of Doctor Griswold, has for many years been a well known citizen of Southeastern Kansas. Born in Livingston County, New York, in 1830, he grew up in that state, and spent part of his boyhood as a “bound boy.” He worked hard to earn his own living from an early age, and as a young man went west to Michigan. His was a life of varied experience. For a time he was a boatman on the Mississippi River. He became an active farmer prior to...

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Biographical Sketch of Willard Griswold

Willard Griswold, from Springfield, Vt., came here previous to 1820, and commenced work as a carpenter. In 1825, he built the house now occupied by his son, Alonzo C. During his long life here, he held the office of town clerk from 1839 to 1848, and served as representative two terms. Of his family of eight children, four now reside in town. Alonzo C., the youngest child, born in 1841, occupies the old homestead on road 26. Willard H., the fourth child, born in 1831, was engaged in mercantile pursuits from 1856 until 1875, and has held the office of town clerk since...

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The Sagamore Hotel

An engraving of the Sagamore is shown in this issue of the Democrat. This, one of the best hotels in Eastern Oregon, was erected by J. B. Griswold last season, and opened under the present management October 1st. The building is well arranged and very commodious, consisting of forty-four rooms, with elegant verandas surrounding it, giving it the homelike appearance an inspection of its interior discloses. The main office is well arranged, supplied as it is with a number of conveniences for guests, including all the leading periodicals and magazines. The baggage room opens off the private office in such a manner that the loss of a piece of baggage cannot possibly occur. The writing room, which opens to the right of the main hall, is very nice a person being enabled to enjoy quietude while attending to their correspondence. The dining room is on the ground floor, and is furnished in a tasty and elegant manner, and he table is supplied with all the markets afford. The universal opinion of the traveling public is that the best meals in Eastern Oregon are served here. The kitchen is neat, clean and well ventilated, to a much greater degree than usually found in a hotel. In the basement are located the commercial sample rooms, vegetable and fruit rooms, and what is beyond doubt one of the finest cold storage plants...

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Biography of J. B. Griswold

The subject of this sketch, who today is considered one of the solid men of Baker County, and who possesses the well-merited confidence and esteem of its citizens was born in White Hall, New York, in 1857. At the age of 2l he moved to Baker City and until 1884 clerked for several different mercantile firms here. He then opened a harness shop, and from time to time has added new lines until today he is carrying line of the largest stocks in the state While his success in a measure may be due to the settling up of the surrounding country, it is still more attributable to the manner in which he has conducted his business. Starting out on the live and let live principle, he has by courteous and fair treatment built up a trade that is a credit to his judgment. He has always been the originator of low prices, and the large trade he enjoys is but the natural result. His stock from a careful inspection seems complete in every wary. To enumerate the various articles carried would take more space than we have in this volume, but we can condense it by truthfully saying that the intending purchaser can find there anything from a needle to a threshing machine. In clothing, boots and slices, dry goods and furnishing goods we find his stock to...

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