Surname: Folsom

The Meeting in 1811 of Tecumseh and Apushamatahah

The meeting in 1811, of Tecumseh, the mighty Shawnee, with Apushamatahah, the intrepid Choctaw. I will here give a true narrative of an incident in the life of the great and noble Choctaw chief, Apushamatahah, as related by Colonel John Pitchlynn, a white man of sterling integrity, and who acted for many years as interpreter to the Choctaws for the United States Government, and who was an eye-witness to the thrilling scene, a similar one, never before nor afterwards befell the lot of a white man to witness, except that of Sam Dale, the great scout of General Andrew...

Read More

Biography of Hon. B. R. Folsom

Hon. B. R. Folsom, retired, was born, February 23, 1809, in Fumbridge, Orange Co., N. Y. His parents soon after removed to Wyoming County, where he was raised; carried on farming, milling and merchandising about twenty-five years; September, 1854, came to Omaha, and, October, 1854, removed to Burt County, where he has since resided, and is now the oldest settler in the State north of Omaha. He, with a party of nine others, made a claim of 640 acres, on which the town of Tekamah now stands. William N. Byers, surveyor, one of this party, surveyed the town site. They also contracted for ten small houses to be erected, and also a town house. The Governor ordered that the census of the county be taken. This occurred the fall before the election; numbered then twenty-six inhabitants. The first two houses built were at the expense of the town company. The first election was held where Cuming City now is, this being then a part of Burt County. The south boundary line was White Cow Creek, which is now part of Washington County. Mr. Folsom at once engaged in farming and stock raising. He, with his brother, erected a steam sawmill at Arizona Bottom, which was the first mill built north of Omaha. He was appointed Probate Judge by the Governor, being the first in the county; was a member...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Acie Thomas

Interviewer: Pearl Randolph Person Interviewed: Acie Thomas Location: Jacksonville, Florida Age: 79 Mr. Thomas was at home today. There are many days when one might pass and repass the shabby lean-to that is his home without seeing any signs of life. That is because he spends much of his time foraging about the streets of Jacksonville for whatever he can get in the way of food or old clothes, and perhaps a little money. He is a heavily bearded, bent old man and a familiar figure in the residential sections of the city, where he earns or begs a very meager livelihood. Many know his story and marvel at his ability to relate incidents that must have occured when he was quite small. Born in Jefferson County, Florida on July 26, 1857, he was one of the 150 slaves belonging to the Folsom brothers, Tom and Bryant. His parents, Thomas and Mary, and their parents as far as they could remember, were all a part of the Folsom estate. The Folsoms never sold a slave except he merited this dire punishment in some way. Acie heard vague rumors of the cruelties of some slave owners, but it was unknown among the Folsoms. He thinks this was due to the fact that certain “po white trash” in the vicinity of their plantation owned slaves. It was the habit of the...

Read More

Biography of Simon Folsom

Simon Folsom, one of the first elders of the Forest Presbyterian Church is now one of the oldest living representatives of the slavery period. Nancy Brashears, his third and present wife, enjoys the distinction of having been the most influential of the early leaders in effecting the organization of that Church. He became an elder in 1887. After twenty-six years of faithful service under very unfavorable circumstances, he is still trying “to hold up for the faith.” In 1901 he enjoyed the privilege of being one of the commissioners of the Presbytery of Kiamichi, and attended the meeting of the General Assembly in Philadelphia. Many of the good things heard and fine impressions received on that occasion, have never been forgotten, and they have furnished him interesting themes, for many subsequent addresses. Though unable to read, he quotes the Bible as one very familiar with that sacred book. He inherited a good memory, that serves him well in public address, and he is always happy and ready when it comes his turn to “speak in meeting.” His messages are always notes of joy and gladness, and the ebb and flow of his voice in prayer often seem like the chanting of a sacred melody. He was an ardent supporter of the Oak Hill school and two of his sons, Samuel and David, both now deceased, were among the brightest...

Read More

David H. Folsom, Choctaw and Chickasaw

David H. Folsom, Choctaw And Chickasaw Commission, No. —. David H. Folsom—, 1899. Appeared before Dawes Commission at Atoka and was rejected. June 4, 1900. Again appeared before commission and was told that he could not be enrolled. The applicant is three-sixteenths Chickasaw and one-sixteenth Choctaw. He was born in Blue County, Choctaw Nation, in 1846, His father was Noah Wall Folsom, who died in Blue County in 1800. His mother. Susan Folsom, was one-half Chickasaw. His sister, Catherine Robinson (formerly McGee), is now upon the final rolls. 1902. The Chickasaw Legislature by resolution requested the enrollment of applicant. The admitted facts as shown by the record in this case are: Was a wanderer from 1868 to 1897, working upon the railroads and in the mines throughout the West. In 1897 he returned to the Chickasaw Nation, where he has lived ever since, but because his name does not appear upon the tribal rolls prepared during his absence from home he was by the commission refused enrollment upon the final rolls of the tribe. Counsel submit that Congress should enroll David Folsom as a citizen of the Chickasaw Nation. Respectfully submitted. Ballinger &...

Read More

Folsom Choctaw Family – List of Mixed Bloods

The Folsom family is easily one of the best known of all mixed-blood groups (see Charts 10 and 11). Their earliest members in Choctaw country were reputedly the three brothers Edmond, Ebeneezer, and Nathaniel who migrated through Indian country with their parents prior to the American Revolution. 1W. David Baird, Peter Pitchlynn: Chief of the Choctaws, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1972) 6. According to Cushman: “Nathaniel Folsom married Aiahnichih Ohoyo (A woman to prefer above all others). She was a niece of Miko Puskush (Infant Chief), who was the father of Moshulatubbee. She descended from a long ancient line...

Read More

Biography of Perley Oscar Folsom

PERLEY OSCAR FOLSOM, active in business and politics at Cushman, Massachusetts, in the town of Amherst, was born in Marshfield, Vermont, March 28, 1882. The name he bears appears first in history in the first half of the fourteenth century. John Foulsham, of Foulsham, was prior of a Carmelite Monastery in Warwick, England. He was a prominent ecclesiastic; and his brother, Richard Foulsham, was even more prominent. The word foule (fowl) signified bird, and the country seat of Foulsham probably took its name from its being the home (ham) of many foules (birds). (I) The first traceable ancestor of the immigrant, John Foulsham, is Roger Foulsham, of Necton, County of Norfolk, England, whose will is dated 1534. (II) William Foulsham, son of Roger Foulsham, married Agnes Smith, alias Foulsham, of Besthorpe. (III) Adam Foulsham, son of William and Agnes (Smith) Foulsham, owned lands in Besthorpe, Wymondham (Windham), Bunwell, Hingham and Hockford. (IV) Adam Foulsham, son of Adam and Emma Foulsham, baptized in 1560, resided in Hingham and owned lands in Besthorpe. He died in 1630. (V) Adam Foulsham, son of Adam and Grace Foulsham, known as Adam of Hingham, died in 1627. His will, made in that year, named three sons, John, Adam and Peter. His wife’s name was Agnes. (VI) John Foulsham, son of Adam and Agnes Foulsham, was baptized in Hingham in 1615. He was the first...

Read More


Free Genealogy Archives

It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest