Surname: Dunbar

1899 Directory for Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts

Resident and business directory of Middleboro’ and Lakeville, Massachusetts, for 1899. Containing a complete resident, street and business directory, town officers, schools, societies, churches, post offices, notable events in American history, etc. Compiled and published by A. E. Foss & Co., Needham, Massachusetts. The following is an example of what you will find within the images of the directory: Sheedy John, laborer, bds. J. G. Norris’, 35 West Sheehan John B., grocery and variety store, 38 West, h. do. Sheehan Lizzie O., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Lucy G. B., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East...

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1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George...

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Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How

A Narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How, who was taken by the Indians at the Great Meadow Fort above Fort Dummer, where he was an inhabitant, October 11th, 1745. Giving an account of what he met with in his traveling to Canada, and while he was in prison there. Together with an account of Mr. How’s death at Canada. Exceedingly valuable for the many items of exact intelligence therein recorded, relative to so many of the present inhabitants of New England, through those friends who endured the hardships of captivity in the mountain deserts and the damps of loathsome prisons. Had the author lived to have returned, and published his narrative himself, he doubtless would have made it far more valuable, but he was cut off while a prisoner, by the prison fever, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, after a captivity of one year, seven months, and fifteen days. He died May 25th, 1747, in the hospital at Quebec, after a sickness of about ten days. He was a husband and father, and greatly beloved by all who knew him.

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War With The Modoc – Indian Wars

Early April 16th, the Modoc had a big fire in their camp. Major Thomas dropped a shell directly into it, provoking a frantic war whoop, and causing the sudden extinguishing of the fire. Another shell was dropped in the same locality, and was followed by yells of pain and dismay. The┬áModoc then appeared and challenged the soldiers to come out and fight. Another shell was the answer, and they were driven back. At 4 o’clock A. M. , after another fight, the┬áModoc gave up the attempt to break through the line and retired. Scattering shots were fired on the...

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John Gyles Captivity Narrative – Indian Captivities

John Gyles captivity narrative provides a stunning display of Abenaki culture and lifestyle, as it was in the 1690’s. John was 10 years old when he was taken captive in the attack on Pemaquid (Bristol Maine) and his narrative provides an accounting of his harrowing treatment by his Indian captors, as well as the three years exile with his French owners at Jemseg New Bruswick. His faith in Christ remains central in the well-being of his mind throughout his ordeal.

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1863 Settlers of Gallatin County, Montana

George E. McKinsey, born in Indiana Aug. 22, 1822. In 1854 he removed to Nebraska, remaining there until 1863, when he went to Montana with an ox-team, and mined for three years at Alder gulch. In 1866 he removed to Madison Valley, and established a ferry, but went back to mining the following year, and in 1869 returned to Middle Creek, settling finally near Bozeman in 1871. He married Sarah Anna Wilson in 1850. Andrew Cowan, Hillsdale, born in Ky March 1834, and raised on a farm. Went to Salt Lake from Missouri by stage in 1863, and from there to Virginia City. Engaged in freighting for one year, after which took a farm of 480 acres in the Gallatin Valley, and raised cattle and horses. He married Rachel C. Tribble in 1872. Henry Heebe, Central Park, born in Pennsylvania Nov. 17, 1840, was bred a fanner. In 1856 went to Kansas, where he resided until 1863, when he proceeded to Montana. In 1864, together with William Coly, William Riley, and Clarke, he discovered the celebrated Pony mine, and the McDonald and Strawberry mines. Heebe sold his interest in the Pony for a trifle, and settled on a farm on the Gallatin River. C. Etherington was born in England June 25, 1831, and emigrated to the U. S. in 1854. After 3 years spent in Pennsylvania, went to Kansas,...

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Biography of Rev. John Dunbar

Rev. John Dunbar was a missionary to the Pawnes Indians of the West for a period of more than twenty years before he became a resident of Kansas. He spent a little over a year in the territory and, as its first treasurer, assisted in the organization of Brown County. Mr. Dunbar was a native of Palmer, Massachusetts, born March 3, 1804. In 1832 he was graduated at Williams College, and later at the Auburn Theological Seminary. While a student at the latter institution he received an appointment as missionary to the western Indians; was ordained at Ithaca, New York, May 1, 1834, and on the 5th left there, with instructions to cross the Rocky Mountains to the Nez Perces. Upon arriving at St. Louis on the 23d, he learned that the party of traders with whom he was to travel had already left for the West, but was informed at the same time that the Pawnee tribe needed missionaries, and he decided to go there. As soon as possible he reported at the agency at Bellevue, nine miles above the mouth of the Platte River, on the west bank of the Missouri, and began his work as missionary. In September, 1836, he returned to Massachusetts, and while there superintended the printing of a book of seventy-four pages in the Pawnee language. On Jannary 12, 1837, he married Miss...

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Slave Narrative of Joseph Leonidas Star

Person Interviewed: Joseph Leonidas Star Location: 133 Quebec Place, Knoxville, Tennessee Place of Birth: Knoxville, Tennessee Age: 81? Occupation: Shoemaker, Poet If the poetic strain in the Dunbar Negroes of the south is an inheritance and not “just a gift from On High,” Knoxville, Tennessee’s aged Negro Poet,-born Joseph Leonidas Star,-but prominently known in the community as “Lee” Star, Poet, Politician and Lodge Man,-thinks that Georgia’s poetic genius Paul Lawrence Dunbar, “maybe took his writin’ spells” from him. “My grandfather and Paul Lawrence Dunbar’s grandfather was cousins. He were a much younger man than I am, for I was eighty-one years old the twenty-sixth of December, 1937. So I reckon I give it down to my kin-man. But it seem to me, that Poets is just born thataway. Po’try is nothin’ but Truth anyway, and it’s Truth was sets us free. And that makes me a free-born citizen bothways and every ways. I were born free. I were always happy-natured and I expect to die thataway. One of my poems is named, ‘Be Satisfied!’ and I say in it that if a man’s got somethin’ to eat, and teeth to bite, he should be satisfied. You cant take your goods with you. Old man Rockefeller, when he died here awhile back, went away from here ‘thout his hat and shoes. That’s the way its goin’ to be with all...

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Biographical Sketch of David Dunbar

In the person of the subject of this sketch we have one of the leading citizens and stockmen of Malheur County, and it is with pleasure that we chronicle the salient paints in his interesting and active career, wherein he has ever manifested integrity, ability and industry. David Dunbar was born in Ontario, Canada, near Kingston, on February 5, 1849, being the son of James and Eliza Dunbar. He was reared on a farm with his parents and gained his education from the common schools of that province. In July 186? he was called to mourn the death of his mother and in the fall of that same year stood forth from the parental roof to do battle with the forces of this world alone. He went to New York and thence by steamer to San Francisco arriving in that city in thirty days. He worked during the winter on the Union Pacific railroad at Truckee, Nevada. Sometime after this he joined a wagon train and made his way to the Idaho Basin. This was in 1867 and he mined for a time and then freighted from Relton, Utah to Silver City, Idaho after which he purchased a band of horses and took them to Montana and sold them, purchasing a band of stock and work cattle. These he brought back to Silver City, selling the cattle for work...

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Biography of George William Dunbar

The first known ancestor of the Dunbar family in America was Robert Dunbar, a Scotchman who, circumstances indicate, was one of the Scotch prisoners sent over to the Massachusetts Colony in 1652, by Cromwell after the battles of Dunbar and Worcester. It is certain that this Robert Dunbar was the ancestor of the Dunbars of Abington and Bridgewater, if not of all bearing that name in New England. The family has always shown the characteristics which have so favorably distinguished the Scotch people. They are good, law-abiding citizens, with a frugal thrift and industry, a careful economy, and cautious and discriminating judgment in all the affairs of life. Samuel Dunbar was a native of Bridgewater, MA, a farmer, prosperous and respected, and reared a family there, among whom was Elijah Dunbar, born in Bridgewater April 23, 1759, graduated at Dartmouth College, studied for the profession of law, and began practice at Keene, NH, 1790. He was at Claremont from 1797 to 1804, then reopened his office in Keene, was a magistrate, and represented Keene in the Legisla ture in 1806-08 and ’10. He was an officer for many years of the old Cheshire Bank at Keene, and one of the leading members of the Keene bar. He married Mary, daughter of Alexander Ralston, of Keene. His son, George Frederick Dunbar, was born at Claremont, NH, September 9, 1793. He...

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Biography of William C. Dunbar, Jr.

A popular citizen of Caldwell, the county seat of Canyon County, is the gentleman whose name appears above. In 1895 he was elected to the position which he now holds, that of county clerk of the district court, and has made a thorough, capable and reliable official. In his political views he is a Populist. Formerly he served as auditor and recorder of Canyon county, and gave entire satisfaction to all concerned in the proper administration of local affairs, and prior to his arrival in this section he acceptably filled the requirements of the office of clerk of the probate court in Salt Lake City, Utah. Mr. Dunbar is a native of the city just mentioned, his birth having taken place on the 23d of August 1854. He is of Scotch-English extraction, and inherited strong, upright, just traits of character from his ancestors. His father, William C. Dunbar, Sr., is one of the oldest residents of Salt Lake City, Utah, as he has dwelt there for almost half a century, going there scarcely two years after it was founded by the Mormons. He was born in Inverness, a city in the far northern highlands of Scotland, but he was reared and educated in Edinburg. Starting-out when a young man to make his own way in the world, he came to the United States, and in 1850 crossed the plains...

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Dunbar, Oron L. – Obituary

Joseph. Wallowa County, Oregon Oron L. Dunbar, who lived in Joseph several years ago, died last Sunday, Oct. 27, at Oregon City, of Influenza. He had lived in California until the first of the year when he went to Oregon City, where he was manager of a store. He was born 48 years ago in Fairview and for a time was manager of the McCully Mercantile company store in Joseph. A daughter, Lucile Dunbar, teaches in the Joseph school, and a son, Raymond, is in the 65th artillery, A.E.F., in France, having enlisted in Joseph more than a year ago. Enterprise Record Chieftain, Wallowa County, Oregon, Thursday, October 31,...

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Biography of James N. Dunbar, Hon.

Hon. James N. Dunbar. As lawyer, judge, farmer and stockraiser, Judge Dunbar has long been one of the prominent citizens of Cherokee County, and has taken an active and valuable part in local affairs. It was the confidence felt by the people in his judgment and integrity as well as his sterling reputation as a lawyer that brought about his election to the district bench, and his administration of that position has more than justified the expectations of those who supported him for the office. Though most of his life has been spent in this section of Kansas, Judge Dunbar was born in McDonough County, Illinois, December 23, 1865. As one might expect from the name, the Dunbars are of Scotch ancestry. Members of this branch of the family immigrated from Scotland to Virginia in Colonial times. Judge Dunbar’s grandfather Daniel Dunbar, who was born in Virginia in 1791, went as a young man over the mountains into Kentucky, was a farmer in that state for many years, and died there in 1866. For a time he served as a member of the Kentucky State Militia. The father of Judge Dunbar was W. Dunbar, who was born in Kentucky in 1816, and died in Cherokee County, Kansas, in 1877. During his early life in Kentucky he married his first wife, took up farming there, afterward lived for ten years...

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Biography of Hon. R. O. Dunbar

HON. R.O. DUNBAR. – It is not always an enviable distinction to be made eminent for political preferments. The exceptions are in the cities where office is held as the currency of political services, and as the opportunity for public plunder. In the smaller communities, however, where personal acquaintance extends to all citizens, and an honest public spirit precludes fraud, one may well feel pride in that confidence of his friends in his ability and probity which selects him as a public servant. Preferment at the suffrage of the citizens of a place like Goldendale, noted for its correct sentiment and love of cleanliness, would therefore be gratifying. Mr. Dunbar has been an office holder of this kind for many years. His political sphere is, however, by no means confined to the town of Goldendale, as he has represented the county of Klikitat in the territorial council, and during one session served that body as speaker. He has served upon important committees, and has introduced important legislative measures. He has been attorney for that district, embracing Klikitat, Yakima, Skamania and Clarke counties, and as a prominent Republican has long been before the party as a probable candidate for delegate to Congress. Mr. Dunbar was born in Schuyler county, Illinois, in 1845. He crossed the plains when but one year old, enduring the trip bravely. His parents christened him Ralph...

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Biography of William Rice Dunbar

W.R. DUNBAR. – The mold in which a place is first cast is a great determining force in its future development. A quarter of a city which begins with mean buildings invites a class of neglectful or impecunious residents, and seldom outgrows its tendency towards squalor. The new settlers which come into a thriftless community sink more easily to the habits of their neighbors before them than they succeed in inciting those lax individuals to more industrious methods. On the other hand, also, thrift, vigor, a high level of public spirit and morality, leave a stamp which sets the tone and fashion of a city or neighborhood for many years. It is with peculiar satisfaction, therefore, that we find places like Goldendale which, from their very incipiency, have admitted nothing but strictly honorable pursuits, and have maintained a vigorous sentiment in favor of only the best things. These places become the augury of a high-minded generation in the future. William Rice Dunbar, the subject of this sketch, is one of the men who have thus set the character of Goldendale. He is a man popularly known throughout the Northwest as a sterling worker in the cause of temperance. as a lecturer on this subject, as an organizer of lodges of Good Templars, and as a prominent officer of that order, he has met thousands of the people personally; and...

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