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Surname: Driver

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

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Slave Narrative of Andrew Simms

Person Interviewed: Andrew Simms Location: Sapulpa, Oklahoma Age: 80 My parents come over on a slave ship from Africa about twenty year before I was born on the William Driver plantation down in Florida. My folks didn’t know each other in Africa but my old Mammy told me she was captured by Negro slave hunters over there and brought to some coast town where the white buyers took her and carried her to America. She was kinder a young gal then and was sold to some white folks when the boat landed here. Dunno who they was. The same thing happen to my pappy. Must have been about the same time from the way they tells it. Maybe they was on the boat, I dunno. They was traded around and then mammy was sold to William Driver. The plantation was down in Florida. Another white folks had a plentation close by. Mister Simms was the owner. Bill Simms, that’s the name pappy kept after the war. Somehow or other mammy and pappy meets ’round the place and the first thing happens they is in love. That’s what mammy say. And the next thing happen is me. They didn’t get married. The Master’s say it is alright for them to have a baby. They never gets married, even after the war. Just jumped the broomstick and goes to living with...

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Biography of Sinclair M. Driver

Sinclair M. Driver, president of the T. Driver & Sons Manufacturing Company. is closely associated with the industrial interests of Racine. He has long been connected with the business and his enterprise has been a dominant factor in its successful control in late years. Mr. Driver was born in Racine. Wisconsin. June 8, 1856. a son of Thomas and Marian (Mainland) Driver, who, in 1854, came to Racine -from the Orkney Islands of Scotland. Making his way to this city he entered the employ of Lucas Bradley, with whom he remained for several years, and then in 1867 purchased the business, which had been established more than two decades before and which was then located at the corner of Sixth and Campbell streets. He continued at the head of the business throughout his remaining days, engaging in the manufacture of sash, doors and woodenware. As the years went on he admitted his sons to a partnership and the brothers were associated in the conduct of the enterprise for a considerable period. One of his first jobs in the field of building operations was on the Presbyterian Church. He and his wife were long consistent members of the congregation that worshiped in that church and their lives were guided by the highest principles. Mr. Driver died in Racine, July 11, 1899, and his wife, January 17, 1912. Reared in his...

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Slave Narrative of Andrew Simms

Person Interviewed: Andrew Simms Location: Sapulpa, Oklahoma Age: 80 My parents come over on a slave ship from Africa about twenty year before I was born on the William Driver plantation down in Florida. My folks didn’t know each other in Africa but my old Mammy told me she was captured by Negro slave hunters over there and brought to some coast town where the white buyers took her and carried her to America. She was kinder a young gal then and was sold to some white folks when the boat landed here. Dunno who they was. The same thing happen to my pappy. Must have been about the same time from the way they tells it. Maybe they was on the same boat, I dunno. They was traded around and then mammy was sold to William Driver. The plantation was down in Florida. Another white folks had a plantation close by. Mister Simms was the owner. Bill Simms – that’s the name pappy kept after the War. Somehow or other mammy and pappy meets ’round the place and the first thing happens they is in love. That’s what mammy say. And the next thing happen is me. They didn’t get married. The Master’s say it is alright for them to have a baby. They never gets married, even after the War. Just jumped the broomstick and goes to...

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