Surname: Chamberlin

Index to Articles found in the El Farol Newspaper 1905-1906

The Lincoln County New Mexico online archives contains pdf’s of all remaining copies of the El Farol Newspaper of Capitan NM, but doesn’t have an index to the newspaper. C. W. Barnum, an active member of AHGP, and state coordinator for the New Mexico AHGP recently invested his time and energy into providing an every person index to the various extant issues. He has shared this wonderful index with AccessGenealogy in hopes that it will reach a wider audience. Enjoy!

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1918 Warren County Farmers’ Directory – C Surnames

Abbreviations Used in this Directory a–Acres; Ch — Children; O–Owner; T–Tenant or Renter; R –Rural Route; Sec-Section; Maiden name of wife follows directory name in parentheses (); figures at end of information–year became resident of county. Star (*) indicates children not at home. Name of farm follows names of children in quotations marks. In case of a tenant, the farm owner’s name follows the figures giving size of farm. Example: ABBEY, William L. (Lena Riggs) Martha and Cora Abbey, Mother and Sister; Kirkwood R1 Tompking Sec8-5 T80a H.M. Abbey Est. (1886) Tel. Farmers’ Line Kirkwood MEANS ABBEY, William L. – Name (Lena Riggs) – Wife’s maiden name. Martha and Cora Abbey – Mother and Sister Kirkwood R1 – Postoffice Kirkwood, R.F.D. 1. Tompking Sec8-5 – Township Tompking, Sections 8-5. T80a – Tenant on 80 acres. H.M. Abbey Est. – Owner of 80 acres. (1886) – Lived in county since 1886. Tel. Farmers’ Line Kirkwood – Farmers’ Line Telephone Kirkwood. C Surnames CABLE BROS., Arthur L. Benn D., Monmouth R6 Floyd Sec18-30 O160a (1860) Mutual Tel. Monmouth CABLE, Charles H. (Phebe Jane Baldwin) Ch *Florence M., *Newton B.; Monmouth R6 Floyd Sec29 O60a (1860) Mutual Tel. Berwick CABLE, Frank E. (Irene Sheldon) Ch Ruth, *H Sheldon; Berwick R1 Berwick Sec8-17 O400a (1862) Private Tel. Berwick CABLE, Hiram Sheldon (Eunice Ralston)Ch Martha; Berwick R1 Berwick Sec8 T76a Mrs. Irene Cable (1893)...

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Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

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Norwich Vermont in the Civil War

During the four years of war for the suppression of the Rebellion, Norwich furnished 178 different men for the armies of the Union. There were seven re-enlistments, making the whole number of soldiers credited to the town 185. By the census of 1860, the number of inhabitants was 1759. It appears, therefore, that the town sent to the seat of war rather more than one in ten of its entire population, during the four years’ continuance of hostilities. About the same proportion holds good for the state at large, Vermont contributing, out of an aggregate population of 315,116, soldiers to the number of 34,555 for the defense of the Union. Of the 178 men enlisting from Norwich, twenty-seven laid down their young lives in the service of the country. The soil of every southern state, from the Potomac to the Rio Grande, was moistened by the blood or supplied a grave to one or more of these. The town paid the larger part of these men liberal bounties, amounting to about $32,000, in addition to their state and government pay. All calls for men upon the town by the national authorities were promptly and fully met. The patriotic response of our people to the expenses and sacrifices of the war was, in general, hearty and emphatic; and yet candor and the truth of history compels us to confess that...

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History of the Baptist Church at Norwich Vermont

In Norwich, as elsewhere, the Baptists were the first of the dissenting sects to contest the ground with the dominant New England orthodoxy. Soon after the settlement of the town we find mention made of Baptists here, and it is probable that a few of the very earliest settlers were of that faith. The following documents are transcribed from the town records: Willington [Ct.] October ye 6, 1780. “This may Certify all Persons whom it may Concern that Calvin Johnsen of Wellington is of the Baptist Persuasion and is one of the society of the Baptist Church in said Willington and is ready to help to support the gospel in that order. “Andrew Main, Clerk” “Willington, September 24, 1784. This may certify that James Johnsen belonged to the Baptist society and his father and mother are Baptist. Signed in behalf of the Church, “Andrew Main, Church Clerk” The above certificates were doubtless procured and lodged in the town clerk’s office by the persons whose names they bear, with a view to exempt themselves from taxation for the support of the Rev. Mr. Potter, the settled minister of “the standing order” in the town at that time, as well as to relieve them from expenses for the building of the first meeting-house then in progress. A law of the state early made taxation for these purposes compulsory on all taxpayers...

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First Settlements in Norwich Vermont

Having glanced thus briefly at the action of the Norwich proprietors in opening a way to reach their new township in the wilderness, and in dividing up a portion of its surface into lots suitable to become the homesteads of future settlers, let us pause a moment and see what had meantime been done in the work of actual settlement. I am indebted to Rev. Edmund F. Slafter of Boston for an interesting account of what was unquestionably the first attempt at settlement made within the limits of the town. I quote from the Slafter Memorial: “Samuel Slafter [of Mansfield, Connecticut], the father of John Slafter, being an original proprietor, and being at the first meeting chosen treasurer of the corporation, took a deep interest in the settlement of the town. At his suggestion, his son John made a journey through the forests of New Hampshire in 1762, to examine the territory and report upon the advantages it might offer as a place of settlement. He found it pleasantly situated on the western banks of the Connecticut, with a good soil, but for the most part of an uneven, hilly surface. He reported it well watered, not only by the Connecticut but by several small, clear streams, and by one more important one called the Ompompanoosuc, an Indian name signifying ‘the place of very white stones’ whose waters emptied...

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Biographical Sketch of E. Chamberlin

E. Chamberlin was born in Windham county, Vermont, November 18, 1821. His father, Nathaniel Chamberlin, was a native of Worcester, Massachusetts. When he was eleven years old his parents moved to Bureau county, Illinois, where he was reared upon a farm and educated in the common schools. In 1852 he engaged in the grocery business, together with butchering and shipping stock. He was among the first settlers of Northern Illinois, and was in Chicago when there were but six houses in the town. In 1867 he came to Daviess county, and is now one of the leading farmers of this county. Mr. Chamberlin was united in marriage, September 29, 1842, to Miss Elizabeth Boyd. She was born January 2, 1822, in Springfield, Illinois; her father, Charles S. Boyd, settled in that State in 1820. Mr. and Mrs. Chamberlin have six children; namely, William O., born April 2, 1850; Oscar G., born July 13, 1852; Charles S., born May 13, 1855; John, born September 9, 1857; Edward, born September 21, 1860; and James, born December 9,...

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Biographical Sketch of Arthur F. Chamberlin

(See Oolootsa) Arthur Fanshaw, son of Rev. Armory N. and Eunice Dolly (Hoyt) Chamberlain, was born October 9, 185 7 in Flint District. He was educated in the public schools and Male Seminary. Married June 9, 1883, at Neosho, Missouri, Letitia, daughter of Hamilton W., and Margaret Goodykoontz, born March 18. 1861, in Newton County, Missouri. They located in Vinita, and are the parents of. Dolly Edith (Cherokee name Oo-loo-tsa) born August 19, 1887; educated in the schools of Vinita, and Henry Kendall College; married June 22, 1907, William Robinson; Catherine Brown, born December 25, 1893; educated at Vinita and Miami University, Oxford, Ohio; married December 22, 1916, James W. Dunnington, son of W. G. and India Knight Dunnington; Arthur Fanshaw Chamberlain, born March 8, 1900. He was in school in Hampton Sidney College in Virginia at the beginning of the war; he enlisted and was mustered out of service at the close of the war. He is superintendent of a tobacco factory at Danville, Virginia. Reverend Armory Nelson, son of Rev. William and Fern (Hoyt) Chamberlain, was born Nov. 29, 1821, at Brainard Mission. He married December 3, 1846, Eunice Dolly, daughter of Milo and Lydia (Lowry) Hoyt, born Dec. 14, 1820, on Chickamaugua River. Rev. A. N. Chamberlain, although a white man, spoke the Cherokee language perfectly. He died July 4, 1894, and his widow died on...

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Joseph Davis and Sarah Chamberlin

K123 JOSEPH DAVIS: 1647; m. Sarah Chamberlin. Had with other issue. K124 JOSEPH DAVIS: 1671; in. and had K125 JOSEPH DAVIS: 1697; m. (1), Sarah Curtiss; m. (2), Ruth Griggs. Had K126 JOSEPH DAVIS: 1725; m. Sarah Davis; had with other issue (1) Samuel: 1761—1835; m. Silence Jewett. (A) Samuel: 1790; m. Jane Benson. (a) Aaron: 1821. (B) Aaron: 1794; m. Electa Mumford. No ch. (2) Joseph: 1763—1855; m. Mary Foster. (A) James: 1795. (B) Joseph: 1803. (C) Ebenezer: 1811; m. Mrs. Sarah M. Foster. (a) Eben: 1860. (3) Moses: 1769—1854; m. Jemima Mclntire. (A) Jephthah: 1796—1863; m. Harriet Congar. (a) Truman P.: 1828; m. Nancy E. Noyes. (b) Romanzo E.: 1831; m. Emrette Miltimore. (B) Moses: 1804; m. Emily Underwoodl. (a) George H.: 1840; m. Elizabeth Morse. 1. George F.: 1863. (b) Charles: 1843; m. Jane H. Dilworth. (C) Salem: 1809; m. Julina Dodge. (a) George Gibbs: 1834; m. Juliette L. Barber. 1. George Monroe: 1859. 2. Fred Charles: 1861. 3. Theron Dexter: 1865. (b) Chester Wakefield: 1837; m. Etta Waterman. 1. Arthur W.: 1874. (c) Dexter Salem: 1841; m. Alice E. Parker. 1. Charles N.: 1873. (4) Aaron: 1771—1849; m. Mrs. Tammazin Bartlett. (A) Dexter: 1806; m. Susan Dunbar. (a) George D.: 1832; m. Julia Stanton. 1. Albert R.: 1859. (B) Aaron: 1810—1875; m. Sarah M. Plumley. (a) Ansen A.: 1836; m. Salina C. Dennis. 1. Frederick...

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Biographies of the Cherokee Indians

Whatever may be their origins in antiquity, the Cherokees are generally thought to be a Southeastern tribe, with roots in Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee, among other states, though many Cherokees are identified today with Oklahoma, to which they had been forcibly removed by treaty in the 1830s, or with the lands of the Eastern Band of Cherokees in western North Carolina. The largest of the so-called Five Civilized Tribes, which also included Choctaws, Chickasaws, Creeks, and Seminoles, the Cherokees were the first tribe to have a written language, and by 1820 they had even adopted a form of...

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Rough Riders

Compiled military service records for 1,235 Rough Riders, including Teddy Roosevelt have been digitized. The records include individual jackets which give the name, organization, and rank of each soldier. They contain cards on which information from original records relating to the military service of the individual has been copied. Included in the main jacket are carded medical records, other documents which give personal information, and the description of the record from which the information was obtained.

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Biography of Martin L. Chamberlin

MARTIN L. CHAMBERLIN. – This representative of the generation of young men born, or for the most part educated and developed, in our state, who are taking such a controlling part in her present rapid development, is the son of the well-known Joseph Chamberlin, who came to this coast in 1855, as missionary to the Indians, and in this capacity was of essential service to General Joel Palmer in getting the late hostile and still sullen and broken-spirited Indians upon the Grande Ronde Reservation. Martin, our subject, was born at Dryden, La Peer county, Michigan, May 17, 1846, and, being the only son in a large family, was almost the chief mainstay of his excellent and greatly beloved mother while the father was laboring in Oregon. The responsibilities thus thrown upon him in his youth he discharged with conscientious fidelity and an ability beyond his years. By the arrangement of the father, the family came out to Oregon in 1857, making this state their first home at the reservation, and enjoying in many ways the half wild and half military life at old Fort Yamhill, in one of the most beautiful of the little valleys of Western Oregon. They here formed the acquaintance of General Phil Sheridan, then stationed at the fort as commander, making of him an esteemed friend. Young Chamberlin was deprived of the early educational advantages...

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Biography of Henry Eastman Chamberlin

Henry Eastman Chamberlin, the Superintendent of the Concord Street Railway, was born in Newbury, Vt., May 28, 1854, son of Charles and Ruth (Eastman) Chamberlin. His father was a native of Newbury, and his mother was born in Haverhill, N.H.; and he is a lineal descendant, on the maternal side, of Roger Eastman, the founder of the family in America. He attended the public schools of Newbury, Vt., and Haverhill, N.H., until he was fourteen years old. In 1869 he went to Union City, Ind., where he entered the employ of the Belle Fontaine Railroad Company as a messenger boy, and rose to the position of telegraph operator. In 1870 he took charge of the office in Anderson, Ind., and, after working in a similar capacity for the company at various points along their line, he in 1873 came to Concord, and entered the train despatcher’s office of the Northern New Hampshire Railroad. In 1875 he was appointed station agent at Fisherville (now Penacook ), and held that position until April, 1893, when he resigned in order to accept the superintendency of the Concord Street Railway. On November 23, 1875, Mr. Chamberlin Mary E. Livengood, of Union City, Ind. She is now the mother of three children; namely, Myla, Iyla, and Ruth Elizabeth. In politics Mr. Chamberlin is a Republican. In 1892 he was elected a member of the...

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