Surname: Carpenter

Treaty of August 24, 1835

Treaty with the Comanche and Witchetaw Indians and their associated Bands. For the purpose of establishing and perpetuating peace and friendship between the United States of America and the Comanche and Witchetaw nations, and their associated bands or tribes of Indians, and between these nations or tribes, and the Cherokee, Muscogee, Choctaw, Osage, Seneca and Quapaw nations or tribes of Indians, the President of the United States has, to accomplish this desirable object, and to aid therein, appointed Governor M. Stokes, M. Arbuckle Brigdi.-Genl. United States army, and F. W. Armstrong, Actg. Supdt. Western Territory, commissioners on the part of the United States; and the said Governor M. Stokes and M. Arbuckle, Brigdi. Genl. United States army, with the chiefs and representatives of the Cherokee, Muscogee, Choctaw, Osage, Seneca, and Quapaw nations or tribes of Indians, have met the chiefs, warriors, and representatives of the tribes first above named at Camp Holmes, on the eastern border of the Grand Prairie, near the Canadian river, in the Muscogee nation, and after full deliberation, the said nations or tribes have agreed with the United States, and with one another upon the following articles: Article 1. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America, and all the individuals composing the Comanche and Witchetaw nations and their associated bands or tribes of Indians, and...

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Slave Narrative of Sarah C. Colbert

Interviewer: Anna Pritchett Person Interviewed: Sarah Colbert Location: Indianapolis, Indiana Place of Birth: Allen County, Kentucky Date of Birth: 1855 Place of Residence: 1505 North Capitol Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue FOLKLORE MRS. SARAH COLBERT-EX-SLAVE 1505 North Capitol Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana Mrs. Sarah Carpenter Colbert was born in Allen County, Kentucky in 1855. She was owned by Leige Carpenter, a farmer. Her father, Isaac Carpenter was the grandson of his master, Leige Carpenter, who was very kind to him. Isaac worked on the farm until the old master’s death. He was then sold to Jim McFarland in Frankfort Kentucky. Jim’s wife was very mean to the slaves, whipped them regularly every morning to start the day right. One morning after a severe beating, Isaac met an old slave, who asked him why he let his mistress beat him so much. Isaac laughed and asked him what he could do about it. The old man told him if he would bite her foot, the next time she knocked him down, she would stop beating him and perhaps sell him. The next morning he was getting his regular beating, he willingly fell to the floor, grabbed his mistress’ foot, bit her very hard. She tried very hard to pull away from him, he held on still biting, she...

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Biographical Sketch of Luther Carpenter

Carpenter, Luther, Ferrisburgh, was born in Ferrisburgh, Vt., in 1795. He was a farmer in early life, but retired in 1872. He represented his town in 1836 and ’37, and also held many of the town offices. He was married on December 7, 1836, to Lydia Ann Davis. They have had two children born to them, only one of whom is now living, Eliza A. (born March 29, 1838; married Daniel Collins in 1856). Mrs. Lydia Ann was a daughter of William and Mercy (Taft) Davis. William was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., in 1772, and his wife Mercy was born in 1782. They settled in Ferrisburgh, Vt., with their parents about 1785. Luther Carpenter was a son of Benjamin and Lucy (Hatch) Carpenter. Benjamin Carpenter was born in Shaftsbury, Vt., in 1769, and settled in East Ferrisburgh, Vt., about 1792. He died in September, 1842, on the farm where he settled. Lucy was born in 1768 and died in 1851. They had a family of six children, two sons and four daughters, two of whom are now living — Luther, born in 1795, and Lucy, born in 1797 (now Mrs....

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Biographical Sketch of Gideon Carpenter

Gideon Carpenter, from Bennington, Vt., located in 1802 upon the farm now occupied by his son Isaiah. He had four children, viz. Ruth, who married Daniel Jackson ; Roxana, who married Erasmus Gulley Truman, a resident of Vergennes, and Isaiah. Gideon died in 1803 or ’04, aged eighty-four...

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Biography of William H. Carpenter

For twenty years William H. Carpenter has been engaged in the real estate business on his own account in Racine and is now senior partner in the firm of Carpenter & Rowland with offices at 610 Main Street. He was born in Manteno, Illinois, September 10, 1872, a son of William I. and Eva M. (Shaw) Carpenter, who were natives of New York and of Maine, respectively. In early life they became residents of Illinois, and on the 1st of September, 1874, removed to Racine. The father was a tinsmith by trade and for many years was employed by the J. I. Case Threshing Machine Company, but both he and his wife have now passed away. William H. Carpenter obtained a public school education in Racine, to which city he was brought by his parents when a little lad of but two years. He started to work for the Palica Trunk Company, occupying the position of bookkeeper and later he received training along the line of his present work in the employ of C. M. Dietrich, a real estate and insurance agent. He afterward turned his attention to the real estate and insurance business on his own account, opening his office in February, 1896, and since that time has been engaged in the business with good success. Eventually he admitted John D. Rowland to a partnership under the firm...

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Biography of John C. Carpenter, Col.

Col. John C. Carpenter, retired attorney, veteran of the Civil war, Kansas pioneer, ex-state senator, successful business man and public-spirited citizen, had flgured so conspicuously and honorably in connection with the public interests, business activity and substantial development of Neosho County for forty-six years that no history of this locality would be complete without the record of his career. Throughout his entire life he had been looked upon as a model of integrity and honor, one who had always stood as an example of what determination, combined with the highest degree of integrity, can accomplish for a man of natural ability and strength of charactor. Colonel Carpenter was born at Indiana, the countyseat of Indiana County, Pennsylvania, February 5, 1838, a son of Ephraim and Elizabeth (Shryock) Carpenter, and a member of a family which came originally from England to America during Colonial times and settled in New Hampshire. Ephraim Carpenter was born August 19, 1788, at Sharon, Windsor County, Vermont, and was there reared to young manhood, when he removed to Greensburg, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania. There he completed his studies and was admitted to the bar, and shortly thereafter moved to Indiana, Pennsylvania, where he continued in the practice of his calling until his retirement. His death occurred June 10, 1860, at Indiana. Mrs. Carpenter, who was born there January 21, 1797, preceded her husband in death, passing...

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Biography of Dr. Algernon Sidney Carpenter

Dr. Algernon Sidney Carpenter, son of Dr. Eber and Judith (Greene) Carpenter, was born in Alstead, N. H., October 16, 1814, and was descended from a family pre-eminently distinguished by the large number of skillful physicians it produced. He was educated in the common schools of his native town, and at Middlebury Medical college, from which he received the degree of M. D., in June, 1837. While acquiring his education he taught school in various places, and was, for a short time, in a store at Chesterfield. With the exception of a few years spent in Gardner and Northfield, Mass., his entire professional life of forty-eight years was passed in Keene. He stood in the front rank in his profession. and enjoyed a success which was unsurpassed by any practitioner in this part of New Hampshire. He was an honor to a profession which he reverently believed reflected high honors upon its members; and during his long, intelligent and conscientious practice, he gained, in an eminent degree, the respect and confidence of those who were the recipients of his indefatigable, ministrations. He was peculiarly sensitive to any violation of the conventional rules of medical etiquette, and was severe in his condemnation of charlatanism. He felt a deep interest in all that pertained to the welfare of Keene, and was prominent in its social life. He was a conspicuous member...

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Biographical Sketch of Dr. Eben Carpenter

Dr. Eben Carpenter was born in Coventry, Conn., in 1780, married Judith Green, and reared a family of nine children. He located in Alstead, N. H., where he had a large practice. His only surviving son, George H., is a physician, and resides in Cleveland,...

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Biographical Sketch of Ezra Carpenter

Ezra Carpenter was born in Keene, June 9, 1774, and died in Surry, January 4, 1849, His son Willard was born in Surry, November 1, 1803, and came to Gilsum in 1865. He died January 27, 1875. George H., son of Willard, now resides on road 14, is a scientific and practical farmer, and was president of the Farmers’ Club in 1878. He has been selectman four...

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Biographical Sketch of Dr. Henry Carpenter

Dr. Henry Carpenter was born in Alstead, N. H., December 24, 1803. His father, Eber Carpenter, was a practicing physician in Alstead from 1802 until his death, May 23, 1841. Henry, the eldest of his eight sons, distinguished himself in the profession of medicine and surgery. He graduated medicine at Castleton, Vt., in 1825, and soon after settled in Chesterfield where he soon gave evidence of superior skill, and with a growing reputation as such, continued the practice of his profession until his death, August 1852. Decisive in all things, ignoring creeds, he spent his life in ministering to the wants of his fellow men, believing that acts, and not creeds or belief constituted true religion. He was a man of large sympathies. He married Lydia H. Chandler, of Colerain, Mass., in 1829, and had born to him two daughters, Helen and Lucretia. His wife died in 1837. Only one of daughters, Lucretia A., is living, and resides in Montrose, Pa., highly esteeme and noted for her Christian virtues. Dr. Carpenter served as representative in the legislature of the state with commendable ability, and in all things in trusted to his care was a man of accredited worth. A son by a later marriage, Charles Henry, served in the late Rebellion, and distinguished himself by meritorious acts and duties during the war, dying in Mississippi soon after the close...

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Biography of Rev. Thomas Wright Carpenter

REV. THOMAS WRIGHT CARPENTER. This earnest and effective worker in the cause of Christianity is a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, but is none the less a successful and enterprising farmer of Howell Valley, Howell County, Missouri He was born in Scott County, Missouri, in 1824. A son of Cyrus and Nancy (Davis) Carpenter, natives of Virginia and Tennessee, respectively, but who came to southeast Missouri in 1811, when young, and there experienced the earthquake shock of that period. They married in what is now Scott County, where they spent the rest of their lives, the father dying in 1834 and the mother in 1870. They united with the Methodist Church at the time the first sermons of that doctrine were preached in south-east Missouri and remained connected with it until their deaths. Cyrus Carpenter was a cripple and as a means of livelihood followed shoe making and carpentering, but remained a poor man all his life, owing to his physical infirmities. His father, Conrad Carpenter, was one of the first settlers of south-east Missouri and died in New Madrid County. He was of French origin, and at the time of the Revolutionary War was a small boy. The maternal grandfather, Caleb Davis, was also one of the pioneers of southeast Missouri and worked at the blacksmith’s trade. The immediate subject of this sketch was one of...

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Biography of George Monroe Carpenter

George Monroe Carpenter. In those activities which lead to success George M. Carpenter had pursued an undeviating career since early manhood. He is one of the leading bankers, capitalists and business men of Southern Kansas and Northern Oklahoma, and is the founder of the City of Elgin, Kansas, where he resided. He began life in comparatively humble circumstances. He knows what it is to be poor and work hard, and his sympathy had always gone out to the man who is struggling to get ahead. He was born in St. Lawrence County, New York, November 16, 1842. The public schools of his native county gave him his early education, he graduated from the Lawrenceville High School at the age of nineteen, and then spent three years in the Academy at Gonverneur, New York. Leaving school in 1864 be was for several years employed in a flour mill at Lawrenceville. Going west to Clinton County, Iowa, he worked as a farm laborer three years. Mr. Carpenter first came to what is now Elgin, Kansas, in 1872. He became identified with the cattle industry when practically all the southwestern country was a vast cattle range. After coming to Elgin he went back to Iowa, and soon began driving cattle back and forth over the trails from Texas to the north. His second arrival in Elgin was with a bunch of cattle...

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Biography of Carmel C. Carpenter

One whose faith in the magnificent agricultural possibilities of Idaho was such as to lead him to become identified with this great basic industry is Carmel C. Carpenter, who is one of the prominent and representative farmers of Latah county. Results have amply justified his confidence, and he today maintains his residence on his fine farm, which is located seven and one-half miles south of the thriving town of Moscow. Mr. Carpenter is a native of the state of Iowa, having been born in Dubuque County, on the 27th of April 1845. His lineage traces back to stanch old English stock, the first American representatives of the family having been numbered among the early settlers in Vermont, from which state the great-grandfather of our subject went forth to valiant service for the cause of independence in the war of the Revolution. Cephas Carpenter, grandfather of Carmel C, was born in Vermont, and, as a colonel in the militia of that state, saw active service in the war of 1812, participating in the battle of Plattsburg Heights. He attained remarkable longevity, being ninety-six years of age at the time of his death and being active and in full possession of his faculties even to the day of his demise. It is a matter of record that he walked a distance of seven miles the day before he passed away, an...

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Biographical Sketch of Frank B. Carpenter

Carpenter, Frank B.; atty. and general counsel The N. Y., C.& St. L. R. R. Co.; born, Oberlin, O., July 17, 1866; son of John D. and Charity G. Lester Carpenter; educated, Oberlin College, A. B., 1888, and Columbia Law School; married, Morrison, Ill., June 3, 1890, Edna Woods; one daughter, Florence, and two sons, John and Edward; 1901 to 1912, assistant general counsel for The N. Y., C. & St. L. Ry. Co.; in 1912, appointed general counsel for the same road; administrator and trustee of the estate of W. J. Gordon, since 1903, succeeding Hon. Samuel E. Williamson, at the time of the latter’s death; general counsel N. Y. C. & St. L. R. R. Co.; pres. The W. J. Gordon Realty Co.; director The Edgewater Land Co., and The Goshen Coal Co.; member auxiliary board, The Guardian Savings and Trust Cc.; member Ohio Bar Assn, Union and Mayfield...

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Biography of L. P. Carpenter

L. P. Carpenter, who has been a resident of northeastern Oklahoma for a third of a century, was actively identified with agricultural interests here until he put aside the work of the fields in 1919 and has since lived retired in an attractive home at Bartlesville. His birth occurred in Clay County, Indiana, on the 11th of November, 1867, his parents being Adam and Anna (Reamy) Carpenter, who were natives of Pennsylvania and Ohio, respectively. Both are deceased. He acquired his education in his native state and on attaining his majority left the parental roof to come to Oklahoma, settling in Osage county, ten miles northwest of Bartlesville. There he devoted his attention to farming and stock raising for many years with excellent success, for he was industrious, energetic and progressive in all of his undertakings. In 1919, having acquired a comfortable competence, he took up his abode in Bartlesville, where he has since lived retired in the enjoyment of well earned ease. In early manhood Mr. Carpenter was joined in wedlock to Miss Mary E. Roy, who was born on the Osage Reservation, about ten miles northwest of Bartlesville, on the 27th of October, 1871, and is a representative of one of the most prominent families of the Osage Nation. Her father, a native of Canada, died before her birth. Her mother; who was Mrs. Rosalie (Prudom) Roy,...

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