Surname: Burton

Norwich Vermont an Independent Township

In America the germ of political organization is the Township, older than the County, older than the State. In New England we find towns established as independent communities, endowed with distinctive rights and privileges, as early as the middle of the seventeenth century. It is to these town governments that we must look for the foundation of republican liberty, to the town meeting, where all citizens meet on a plane of equality to choose their local officers and manage their local affairs. Here is the firm basis upon which all free institutions can rest. Ralph Waldo Emerson once proposed that the records of a New England town should be printed and presented to the governments of Europe, to the English nation as a thank-offering and as a certificate of the progress of the Saxon race; to the continental nations as a lesson of humanity and love. De Tocqueville said that the government of a New England township was the best specimen of a pure democracy that the world has ever seen. The town charters granted by New Hampshire conferred upon the inhabitants of each township, from its first organization, the right of self-government in town meeting, by the election of town officers and general ejection of town affairs. Such, also, had long been the practice in Connecticut, from whence a large proportion of all the early settlers had immigrated...

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Cattaraugus Indian Reservation Map and Occupants, 1890

The Cattaraugus Reservation, in Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, and Erie Counties, New York, as delineated on the map, occupies both sides of Cattaraugus creek. It is 9.5 miles long on a direct east and west line, averages 3 miles in width at the center, dropping at is eastern line an additional rectangle of 2 by 3 miles. A 6-mile strip on the north and 2 “mile blocks” at diagonal corners are occupied by white people, and litigation is pending as to their rights and responsibilities. The Seneca Nation claims that the permit or grant under which said lands were occupied and...

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Biography of John W. Burton

John W. Burton was born in Lawrence County, Indiana, November 29, 1842. His father, Eli Burton, is a native of North Carolina, and is now in the seventieth year of his age; his grandfather, John H. Burton, was a native of Virginia. Eli Burton migrated to Indiana, when a young man, bought a farm. on which was a small log house, and there the subject of this sketch was born, and there his father continues to live, but the log cabin has given way to a handsome modern residence, surrounded by the broad acres of a well-improved farm, instead of the thick, heavy timber of the early days. Upon this farm, J. W. Burton and his eight brothers were reared, and taught habits of thrift and industry, working in the summer and attending school in the winter. This school was taught in a log cabin of contracted dimensions, two miles distant from the old homestead, and there our subject received the elementary foundation of his education, which he afterward completed at the University of Michigan, where he graduated, receiving the degree of Bachelor of Laws, in 1868. At the breaking out of the war, in 1861, although but eighteen years of age, he volunteered for the defense of the Union, enlisting as a private in the Fiftieth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, served three years, and was promoted corporal for...

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Slave Narrative of Mandy Cooper

Interviewer: Wm R. Mays Person Interviewed: Frank Cooper Narrative of: Mandy Cooper Location: 715 Ott St., Franklin, Indiana Died at Age: 115 Wm. R. Mays Dist. 4 Johnson County, Ind. July 29, 1937 SLAVERY DAYS OF MANDY COOPER OF LINCOLN COUNTY, KENTUCKY FRANK COOPER 715 Ott St., Franklin, Ind. Frank Cooper, an aged colored man of Franklin, relates some very interesting conditions that existed in slavery days as handed down to him by his mother. Mandy Cooper, the mother of Frank Cooper, was 115 years old when she died; she was owned by three different families: the Good’s, the Burton’s, and the Cooper’s, all of Lincoln Co. Kentucky. “Well, Ah reckon Ah am one of the oldest colored men hereabouts,” confessed aged Frank Cooper. “What did you all want to see me about?” My mission being stated, he related one of the strangest categories alluding to his mother’s slave life that I have ever heard. “One day while mah mammy was washing her back my sistah noticed ugly disfiguring scars on it. Inquiring about them, we found, much to our amazement, that they were mammy’s relics of the now gone, if not forgotten, slave days. “This was her first reference to her “misery days” that she had evah made in my presence. Of course we all thought she was tellin’ us a big story and we made fun of...

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Biography of Hon. George W. Burton

The Honorable George William Burton, the senior Justice of Her Majesty’s Court of Appeal for the Province of Ontario, is a native of Sandwich, in the County of Kent, England, where he was born on the 21st of July, 1818, being the second son of the late .Admiral George Guy Burton, R. N., of Chatham, Kent, England. He was educated at Rochester, in his native shire, under the late Dr. Whiston, the able author of a work on Cathedral Trusts and their fulfillment, which resulted after many years of litigation in the removal of the abuses which he so ably exposed. Our subject came to this country in 1837, and at once began the study of law under the late Mr. Edmund Burton, then practicing at Ingersoll, in the County of Oxford, Upper Canada. He was called to the Bar in 1841, and began the practice of his profession at the City of Hamilton, then a small town at the head of Lake Ontario, where he continued until his appointment to the Bench; having built up one of the most successful practices west of Toronto, then and now the capital and the seat of law and learning. He was created a Queen’s Counsel about the year 1862, and was nominated as a Bencher of the Law Society from about the year 1856, and was re-elected when that body became...

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Biography of Joseph Ralph Burton, Hon.

Among the men who have come out of the Hoosier State to aid Kansas in its. real growth and development, there had been no finer man nor better citizen than Hom. Joseph Ralph Burton. Youthful in years as he was in experience when he came to Kansas in 1878, he plunged at once into the heart of affairs and gained ready recognition from the people. Senator Burton had at that time the ability to impress others with his reliability; he gained public confidence; he possessed the power of making people know that his talents were not merely skin deep but that they were solid, substantial and lasting. Nearly forty years have passed since he cast his fortunes with the workers who have constrncted the mighty commonwealth of the Sunflower and his reliability need not now be mentioned, it is so well known; the public confidence which he gained in his youth had been strengthened and solidified as the years have passed; his hold upon the people is strong and sure because of what he had done in their behalf. His record speaks for itself. Joseph Ralph Burton was born on his father’s farm near Mitchell, Lawrence County, Indiana, November 16, 1852, his parents being Allen C. and Elizabeth (Holmes) Burton. The Burton family, which is of English origin, was founded in America about the year 1750. John P. Burton,...

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Biographical Sketch of William D. Burton

William D. Burton is a Champaign County pioneer, was a farmer during his more active years, and since moving to Champaign has done much for the betterment and improvement of that city. Mr. Burton was born near Cincinnati, Ohio, January 28, 1830, a son of Elijah and Deliah (Dimmitt) Burton, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of Virginia. His father was a farmer and both he and his wife died in Knox County, Illinois. There were nine children: Malinda J., who died in California; Harvey, deceased; William D.; Henry, of Grant’s Pass, Oregon; Sarah, John and George, all deceased; Oliver, who lives in Iowa; and Hiram, of Colorado. William D. Burton was reared in Ohio, and first passed through Champaign County when on his way to Iowa. The following year, 1858, he returned to Knox County and later to eastern Illinois and located on a farm four miles north of Mahomet in Champaign County. He still owns a hundred acres of the land which he developed and cultivated in that section. In 1892 he came to Champaign, was real estate agent for some years, and invested in local property, including his own home and other parcels of real estate. Mr. Burton was the man who set out all the trees in the East Side Park addition. On March 20, 1856, he married Mary Abbott Wright, who...

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Biography of John D. Burton

John D. Burton. Like many of his contemporaries in the field of journalism in Southeastern Kansas, John D. Burton, proprietor and editor of the Potwin Ledger, began his career at the case. His entire life had been devoted to newspaper work, as compositor, editor and owner of publications in various parts of the country, but principally in Kansas, where he had resided and labored since the fall of 1878. While his present publication was founded only recently, it had already gained a wide circulation and promises to become an organ of influence in public matters under Mr. Burton’s wise and experienced direction. John D. Burton was born at Springfield, Illinois, July 1, 1857, and is a son of David A. and Elizabeth (Tarr) Burton. He comes of a family which, originating in England, was founded in North Carolina by three brothers, William, Thomas and Allen Burton, the last named of whom, his great-grandfather, became a pioneer farmer of Indiana and died in the vicinity of Terre Haute. Allen H. Burton, son of the immigrant, and grandfather of John D. Burton, was born at Charlotte Court House, North Carolina, and was there reared, educated and married. Subsequently he went to Indiana, but later became a pioneer into Williamson County, Illinois, where he condueted a blacksmith shop until his death. He married Cynthia Boyle, a native of Ireland. David A. Burton, father of John D., was...

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Biographical Sketch of Theodore Elijah Burton

Burton, Theodore Elijah; U. S. senator to March 3, 1915; born, Jefferson, O., Dee. 20, 1851; son of Rev. William and Elizabeth ‘(Grant) Burton; A. B., Oberlin College, 1872, A. M. 1875; (LL. D., Oberlin, 1900, Dartmouth, 1907, Ohio University, 1907); unmarried; admitted to bar, 1875, and since in practice at Cleveland; member 51st (1889-1891), and 54th to 61st (1895-1911) congresses; 21st Ohio Dist.; resigned from 61st Congress, March 4, 1909; U. S. senator, 1909-1915; chairman Inland Waterways Commission, 1906-1908; chairman National Waterways Commission; member National Monetary Commission; Republican nominee for mayor, Cleveland, 1907; delegate Republican National convention, 1904, 1908 (placed William Howard Taft in nomination for the Presidency, Chicago, 1908); pres. Grant Family Ass’n of the U. S. Clubs: Union, Rowfant (Cleveland), Metropolitan (Washington). Author: Financial Crisis and Periods of Industrial and Commercial Depression, 1902; Life of John Sherman, 1906; Corporations and The State, 1911; pres. American Peace Society,...

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Biographical Sketch of Charles Emerson Burton

Burton, Charles Emerson; clergyman; born, Iowa, March 19, 1869; son of John Henry and Jane A. Simons Burton; educated, Carleton College, A. B., 1895, M. A., 1898, Chicago Theological Seminary, King; issue,B. D., 1898, Carleton College, D. D., 1911; married; Menoken, N. D., Oct. 17, 1898, Cora Viola Dorothy Viola, Lyndon David, Malcolm King and Myron Simons; preached before and during college course in the missions and churches of the Congregational order of Minneapolis; spent summer vacations preaching in home missionary churches in Minnesota and North Dakota; pastor Puritan Church, Chicago, 1895-1898, Lyndale Church, Minneapolis, 1899-1909; associate pastor to Dr. Washington Gladden, First Congregational Church, Columbus, O., 1909 and 1910; began pastorate Euclid Avenue Church, Cleveland, March 1, 1911; trustee Congregational Home Missionary Society, New York, Congregational Union, Cleveland, National Anti-Saloon League; former trustee of Carleton College and Chicago Theological Seminary; member Delta Sigma Rho (honor) Fraternity; member Business Men’s Club, Y. M. C. A., and Congregational Club, Cleveland and vicinity (pres. 1913-1914); won oratorical honors of college and state of Minnesota; interested in social and civic application of religion, helped organize Minneapolis Congregational Union, Council of Churches, Columbus, and Federated Churches,...

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Biography of Ellsworth L. Burton

Ellsworth L. Burton. One of the very able members of the Kansas Legislature in the session of 1915-16 was Representative E. L. Burton from Parsons. Mr. Burton is an attorney by profession, has spent most of his life in Kansas, and has some very influential and important connections in his part of the state. He was born at Mattoon, Illinois, April 30, 1868. The Burtons came from England and settled in the Carolinas during colonial days. Mr. Burton is a direct descendant of Cavalier Burton. His grandfather Alfred Burton was born near Guilford Court House in North Carolina, and died in Jasper County, Illinois. George Burton, father of E. L. Burton, was born in Jasper County, Illinois, in 1841, and spent most of his early youth and manhood there. He enlisted from Illinois in the Seventy-ninth Illinois Infantry, and later was a member of the Ninety-seventh Regiment from that state. Altogether he served three years in the Union army, and among the various campaigns in which he participated was the siege of Mobile. After the war he returned to Illinois, continued farming for several years, but in 1870 moved out to Kansas and was one of the early homesteaders along the line of the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railroad in Neosho County. He acquired 160 acres there, but subsequently sold that farm and moved to Montgomery County. He finally...

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Biography of A. R. Burton

A notably successful career is that of A. R. Burton, who is the owner of a valuable farm in the Sand Creek district, near Bartlesville, which in all of its equipment is thoroughly modern, while the methods employed in the cultivation and development of the place are the expression of the latest scientific research along agricultural lines. He also receives a good income from oil wells upon his property and is a most astute and enterprising business man, carrying forward to a successful issue whatever he undertakes. A. R. Burton is a native of West Virginia. He was born in Jackson County on the 11th of October, 1867, his parents being Giles R. and Ophelia (Gerald) Burton, also natives of that state. Both are deceased, the father passing away when the subject of this review was an infant. Colonel Gerald, the maternal grandfather of Mr. Burton, was one of the most extensive planters in the south previous to the Civil war, his estate being situated in West Virginia. In 1886, when a young man of nineteen years, A. R. Burton made his way from Kansas to Indian Territory, locating on Bird creek, in Osage County, where he devoted his attention to farming. Subsequently he removed to his present ranch of six hundred and fifty-five acres, situated five miles southwest of Bartlesville, upon which he has placed many modern improvements,...

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John Burton

Sergt., Co. Hdqrs., 6th Div., 78th Reg. F. A.: of Yancey County; son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Z. Burton. Entered service June 1, 1917, at Burnsville, N.C. Sent to Ft. Riley, Kans., from there transferred to Camp Logan, Texas, then to Ft. Sill, Okla., from there to Camp Mills. Sailed for France July 13, 1918. Fought at Meuse-Argonne, Stoney. One and one-half months in Germany on “Secret Service Duty.” Returned to USA July 18, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., Aug. 3,...

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Mary Todd Burton of Plymouth WI

BURTON, Mary Todd7, (Daniel6, Daniel5, Daniel4, Daniel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Sept. 29, 1803, in East Rodman, N. Y., married Dec. 28, 1826, William Burton. They removed to Plymouth, Wis., about 1843, where she passed her remaining days and died there at an advanced age. Children: I. Isaac N., b. Oct. 26, 1827. II. Martha, b. Sept. 1829. III. Electa, b. July, 1831. IV. William, b. Jan. 2, 1833. V. Julia, b. Dec. 16, 1835, d. June 1836. VI. Eliza, b. Aug. 1, 1838. VII. George. VIII....

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