Surname: Burnham

Descendants of Richard Kimball of Ipswich MA

KIMBALL. Richard Kimball, of the parish of Rattlesden, County of Suffolk, England, with his family, came to New England in the ship “Elizabeth” in 1634, arriving at Boston, and thence went to Watertown, Mass. He soon became a prominent and active man in the new settlement, was proclaimed a freeman in 1635, and was proprietor in 1636-37. Soon thereafter he removed to Ipswich, where he passed the remainder of his life. His services as a wheelwright were very much appreciated. Mr. Kimball married Ursula, daughter of Henry Scott, of Rattlesden, and (second) Oct. 25, 1661, Mrs. Margaret Dow, of Hampton, N. H. He died June 22, 1675. His widow died March 1, 1676. His children, all by the first marriage, and all born in England except the youngest child, were: Abigail, Henry, Elizabeth, Richard, Mary, Martha, John, Thomas and Sarah. Richard Kimball (2), son of Richard, was born in Rattlesden, England, about 1623. He came to New England with his parents. He removed from Ipswich to Wenham, near Ladd’s Hill, in the western part of the town, and became a large land owner. He was a subscriber to the minister’s rate in 1657; Dec. 4, 1660, he was on the committee to see about building the new meetinghouse, and in 1663 was on the committee to join with the select-men to put out the new contract. With the exception...

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Bolton Massachusetts Warnings 1737-1788

In the following information all the names, dates and other essential particulars which appear in the returns to the Court in the County of Worcester during the entire period – a full half-century, from 1737 to 1788 – in which these entries were made, are given. The returns from each place have been brought together and arranged under the name of the town or district, in this case Bolton Massachusetts.

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Lowell Massachusetts Genealogy

Tracing ancestors in Lowell, Massachusetts online and for free has been greatly enhanced by the University of Massachusetts in Lowell which provided digitized version of a large quantity of the Lowell public records. Combined with the cemetery and census records available freely online, you should be able to easily trace your ancestors from the founding of Lowell in 1826 through 1940, the last year of available census records. To add color to the otherwise basic facts of your ancestors existence we provide free access to a wide range of manuscripts on the history of Lowell, it’s manufactures and residents.

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Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

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Sinclair Genealogy of Bluehill, Maine

Edward Sinclair was born June 20, 1760, supposed at Beverly, where he died while on a visit May 19, 1827, aged sixty-seven years. He married Dec. 17, 1789, Mary Carleton, from Andover, a sister of David, Dudley, Edward and Moses Carleton. She was born Sept. 17, 1760, and died Jan. 1, 1841, aged 80 years and 4½ months. The family of Edward Sinclair, Sr. consisted of the following children: Maria, Edward, Nabby, Dudley, Ebenezer and William.

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The Settlers of Narraguagus Valley Maine

A glance at the map of the western part of Washington County will show that any treatment of the early settlement upon the Narraguagus River, necessarily involves more or less of the histories of Steuben, Milbridge, Harrington and Cherryfield. Steuben was formerly township “No. 4, East of Union River,” and No. 5 comprised the territory now included in the towns of Milbridge and Harrington. The town of Cherryfield is composed of No. 11, Middle Division, Brigham Purchase, and of the northeastern part of what was formerly Steuben. All that part of Cherryfield lying south of the mills on the...

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Ayer Family Genealogy of Buxton Maine

The ancestors of the Ayer families in the state, were early settled at Haverhill, Mass., and from that town came the Ayers of Biddeford and Buxton. John was at Salisbury, 1640; at Ipswich, 1648; died at Haverhill, 1657, leaving numerous descendants. Peter Ayer was admitted freeman at Haverhill, 1666; chosen representative, 1683-85-89-90. Robert and Thomas were admitted freemen at Haverhill, 1668. Maj. Ebenezer Ayer was with Arnold in the Canada expedition through the wilderness of Maine, and displayed consummate courage and great determination. He is said to have sawed off the pickets upon the enemy’s breastworks to enable the soldiers to scale the walls. He afterwards served in the engineer department with rank of major. I suppose he settled in Buxton. Peter Ayer was in Capt. John Lane’s company, in 1756; also Philip Ayer, who served as corporal; both were designated “of Haverhill.” Moses Ayer, b. Mar. 17, 1757; m. Mary, b. Aug. 10, 1759, and had children, named as follows, born in Saco: Elizabeth Ayer, b. May 27, 1782. John Ayer, b. Sept. 27, 1783. Sarah Ayer, b. Oct. 23, 1786. Hannah Ayer, b. Oct. 13, 1791. Abigail Ayer, b. June 13, 1793. Andrew Ayer, b. Mar. 18, 1795. Moses Ayer, b. Feb. 9, 1797. Tristram Ayer, b. Feb. 19, 1799. I suppose it was this man who married Frances, and had children, born in Buxton, named as...

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Business Men of Northern Maine

The Northern Maine, its Points of Interest and its Representative Business Men manuscript provides historical sketches of the nine towns featured within it’s embrace, as well as biographical sketches of the businesses and the men and women who owned and ran those businesses found within the towns of Houlton, Presque Isle, Caribou, Ft. Fairfield, Danforth, Lincoln, Mattawamkeag, Winn, and Kingman.

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History of Norwich Vermont Education

From the town records it appears that the first attempt to divide the town into school districts, was at a town meeting held November 19, 1782, when John Slafter, Elijah Brownson, Ithamar Bartlett, Joseph Loveland, Paul Bingham, Joseph Hatch, Daniel Baldwin, Abel Wilder and Samuel Brown, Jr., were made a committee for that purpose. Soon thereafter the committee reported that they “could effect nothing on the business of their appointment,” and were discharged. No further move in town meeting towards districting the town for school purposes appears to have been made until March 30, 1785, when, on petition of...

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Biography of Albert C. Burnham

Albert C. Burnham. Even the most casual visitor in Champaign is accustomed to associate the name Burnham with that city, where two of its most prominent institutions bear the name. It is true in a broad sense that the good or evil men do in their days lives after them, but seldom does this continuing influence take a better form of concrete benefit than in the Burnham Athenaeum Library and the Julia F. Burnham Hospital in Champaign. They are memorials with a purpose, and a reaction for good day after day upon the lives of thousands in the community which the late Albert C. Burnham did so much to enrich and improve. There was little significance attached at the time to the quiet advent of Albert C. Burnham into the law office of J. B. McKinley as a student in the spring of 1862. He was “practically unknown, but a’t the end of thirty-five years of labor as a lawyer, banker and business man his work was firmly entrenched in the esteem and the business fabric of the community. Albert C. Burnham was born at Deerfield, Michigan, February 20, 1839, and died at Champaign, September 13, 1897. He had the training of a Michigan farm boy. His early education was from the public schools. During the years 1860-61 he taught school during the winter months in Iroquois County, Illinois....

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Biographical Sketch of Egbert Davison Burnham

Egbert Davison Burnham is the only surviving son of the late Albert C. Burnham, long prominent as a pioneer lawyer and banker at Champaign and whose career is more fully noted on other pages. Robert Davison Burnham learned banking with his father, but for many years has been actively engaged in the farm loan business, with offices in the First National Bank Building. He was born in Champaign, February 19, 1872, one of the five children of the late A. C. Burnham and wife. Three of these children died in infancy. Mr. Burnham was the oldest and the second in age was Mary Bruce, now wife of Newton M. Harris. Mr. Burnham was liberally educated, though he did not complete a university course. He attended the University of Illinois and also the famous college preparatory school at Lawrenceville, New Jersey. He left school to take a position in his father’s office in the Burnham, Trevett & Mattis Banking Company. He was well trained in the details of banking, but in a short time left his father’s office to form a partnership with his brother-in-law, Newton M. Harris, in the farm loan business. Mr. Burnham has the public spirit of his honored father, has been a member of the Park Commission of Champaign, and is now serving on the Public Library Board. He is a member of the Episcopal church....

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Biographical Sketch of Zacheus Burnham

Zacheus Burnham, son of John Burnham, elsewhere mentioned in this volume, was born in the Township of Hamilton, County of Northumberland, Ontario, March 31, 1819. His father was a native of New Hampshire; his mother, whose maiden name was Hannah Harris, was from New York. He received his literary education at the Cobourg Gram mar School; studied law a while with his elder brother, Elias Burnham, at Peterborough; finished his legal studies with Hon. Robert Baldwin, in Toronto; commenced practice at Port Hope in 1842; removed to Whitby the next year; was called to the Bar at Easter Term, 1847, and continued to practice until 1852, when he was appointed Junior Judge of the United Counties of York, Ontario and Peel. In 1854, when Ontario was set off, he was appointed Judge, and still holds that position. In the discharge of his duties he is painstaking and conscientious. In politics the Judge is a Reformer, like the larger number of the Burnhams in the Province, and before going on the Bench, took an active part in political matters. For many years his religious connection was with the Church of England; he is now a member of Christ’s Body, commonly known as Brethren. Judge Burnham was first married in October, 1848, to Sarah, daughter of John Borlase Warren, of Oshawa. She had one son, John Warren Burnham, Clerk of the...

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Biography of George Burnham, M.D.

George Burnham, more than forty years a medical practitioner at Peterborough, is a son of John Burnham, who came from New Hampshire, and settled on a farm between Port Hope and Cobourg, where the son was born September 4, 1814. Reference to his father is elsewhere made in this volume in a sketch of “The Burnham Family.” George was educated at the Port Hope grammar school; studied medicine in the same term with Dr. McSpaddin, attended lectures at the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, New York; there received the degree of M.D., and subsequently the same degree from the College of Physicians and. Surgeons of Ontario. Dr. Burnham settled in Peterborough about 1836; and since that date has been in practice here, doing an extensive business until two or three years ago, when trouble with his eyes compelled him to partially retire from practice. For several years after first settling here, his rides extended over an area of thirty miles in all directions, and sometimes even forty or fifty miles. He had the utmost confidence of the people, and many of the older settlers, still living in this vicinity, have vivid recollections of his hardships in reaching their homes, in their times of sickness, and of his kindly disposition, as well as of skill in curing them and their friends. Dr. Burnham was for many years a member and chairman...

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Biography of Rev. Mark Burnham

The subject of this sketch was a son of Zaccheus Burnham, and was born at Cobourg, county of Northumberland, July 12, 1804, his father being a pioneer in that county. Zaccheus Burnham was born in Dunbarton, N. H., February 10, 1777, while the American revolution was in progress, and immigrated to Canada, with his father, Asa Burnham, in 1798, reaching Haldimand in May of that year. In the autumn of 1800, he returned to New Hampshire, and on the first of February 1801, married Elizabeth Choate, reaching Canada again on the 28th of the same month. Zaccheus Burnham was a very prominent man in the county of Northumberland for many years. He was elected member of Provincial Parliament for Northumberland and Durham in May 1816, and for Northumberland alone in 1824; was called to the Legislative Council in 1831, and held that office until the union of the Provinces which was consummated in February, 1841. He was Treasurer of New Castle District for several years, commencing in 1814. As early as 1801, he entered the Northumberland regiment of militia as a private, and rose through every grade until he obtained the rank of Colonel, when he resigned his commission. He died about the year 1857. Beside the subject of this sketch, Zaccheus Burnham had four daughters, Elizabeth, older than Mark, and Achsa, Maria, and Affa, younger. The son received...

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Biography of John Burnham, MX.

The subject of this brief sketch is a son of Rev. Mark Burnham, and grandson of Zacheus Burnham, both of whom are elsewhere mentioned in this volume, and was born at St. Thomas, county of Elgin, Ontario, on the 3rd of December, 1842. He was educated at the grammar schools in Peterboro’ and Galt, at the latter town under Professor Tassie, now at the head of the Collegiate Institute at the same place; read law with Charles A. Weller, county attorney of Peterboro; was called to the Bar at Hilary term, 1865, and from that date has bee n in practice at Peterboro, his home being in Ashburnham, which is separated from Peterboro’ by the Otonabee river. He does business in the several courts of the Province and Dominion, and had a liberal practice almost from the start. Mr. Burnham has good legal attainments and excellent abilities, is a close student, a solid thinker, and an ambitious and growing man. Mr. Burnham became connected with the volunteer service in 1862, being Captain of a volunteer company for a number of years, resigning to take the position of paymaster with rank of Captain of the 57th battalion; was a member of the Ashburnham school board at one period; has been in the village council since 1868, and reeve since 1872; was warden of the county in 1877, 1878 and 1879,...

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