Surname: Brinton

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

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The Discovery Of This Continent, it’s Results To The Natives

In the year 1470, there lived in Lisbon, a town in Portugal, a man by the name of Christopher Columbus, who there married Dona Felipa, the daughter of Bartolome Monis De Palestrello, an Italian (then deceased), who had arisen to great celebrity as a navigator. Dona Felipa was the idol of her doting father, and often accompanied him in his many voyages, in which she soon equally shared with him his love of adventure, and thus became to him a treasure indeed not only as a companion but as a helper; for she drew his mapsĀ and geographical charts, and...

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The Original Grantees of Norwich Vermont

The following is a list of men who received grants of land in the future town of Norwich Vermont on 5 July 1761. Most of these men resided in and around Mansfield Connecticut. Many of the men never set foot in the actual town of Norwich, choosing at some point not to accept Eleaer Wales Daniel Welch Abner Barker Ebenezer Wales Ebenezer Heath William Johnson ye 3d Gideon Noble James West Daniel Baldwin Calvin Topliff Samuel Johnson Elisha Wales Seth Wales Amos Fellows Jedidiah Brinton John Fowler Nathan Strong Robert Turner William Johnson Samuel Root Solomon Wales Joseph Blanchard Josiah Root Adoniram Grant George Swain Samuel Root junr Benja Jennings Moses Holmes Benjamin Sheapard Elisha Carpenter Lemuel Holmes Abner Barker Jr. Nathaniel Harriman Samuel Long Ebenezer Smith John Johnson Thomas Welch Joseph Storrs Samuel Cobb Judah Heath James Russell Hezekiah Johnson Jonathan Hatch Samuel Slafter Benja Whitney James Bicknall Jacob Fenton Moses Barnard AleazerWest Andrew Crocker Eliphas Hunt Stephen Palmer Eleazr Warner Abijah Learned The Hon. Theodore Atkinson Esq. Richard Wilbird Esq. Henry Sherburne Esq. Mr. Andrew Clarkson Clement March Esq. John Shackford Mesheck Weare Esq. Rev. Mr. Samuel Havem Peter Gilman...

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Brinton, Byran Charles – Obituary

Byron Charles Brinton, 93, of Baker City, died March 22, 2005, at his home with his family at his side. Funeral services will be held Saturday at 1 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church, 1995 Fourth St. The Rev. Susan Barnes will officiate. A brief graveside service will be held at Mount Hope Cemetery. A reception will follow at First Presbyterian Church. Visitations will be held Friday from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Gray’s West & Company Pioneer Chapel, 1500 Dewey Ave. Byron was born in a “print shop” on Jan. 28, 1912, to Charles McKay and Elizabeth Rose (Mueller) Brinton in Fessenden, N.D. He attended schools there, at Browning, Mont., Marcus, Wash., and graduated from North Powder High School in 1929. He served in the United States Navy during World War II in San Francisco. He attended the University of Oregon, earning a junior certificate with honors. He quit in 1934 to become editor of The Record-Courier, a post he held until 1999. He became publisher in 1959 after buying his family’s interest in the paper and served in that capacity until 2004, when he sold to his son Byron (RonD). He married Roberta Lee Wright, a graduate of Haines High School, on Sept. 14, 1935, and to this union five children were born: Lynn Ann, Ross Burr, Byron Dorsey, Alice Kathleen and Greg Charles. Byron grew...

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Blackfeet Religion

In ancient times the chief god of the Blackfeet their Creator was Na’pi (Old Man). This is the word used to indicate any old man, though its meaning is often loosely given as white. An analysis of the word Na’pi, however, shows it to be compounded of the word Ni’nah, man, and the particle a’pi, which expresses a color, and which is never used by itself, but always in combination with some other word. The Blackfoot word for white is Ksik-si-num’ while a’pi, though also conveying the idea of whiteness, really describes the tint seen in the early morning light when it first appears in the east the dawn not a pure white, but that color combined with a faint cast of yellow. Na’pi, therefore, would seem to mean dawn-light-color-man, or man-yellowish-white. It is easy to see why old men should be called by this latter name, for it describes precisely the color of their hair. Dr. Brinton, in his valuable work, American Hero Myths, has suggested a more profound reason why such a name should be given to the Creator. He says: “The most important of all things to life is light. This the primitive savage felt, and personifying it, he made light his chief god. The beginning of day served, by analogy, for the beginning of the world. Light comes before the Sun, brings it forth, creates...

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