Surname: Boardman

Norwich Plain Meeting House

The present meeting house at Norwich Plain 1The writer is informed that the architect of the building was Ammi B. Young, who planned the additions to the White House at Washington, D. C. was built in 1817, and dedicated November 20th of the same year. On the following day, Reverend R. W. Bailey was ordained pastor and continued as such till November, 1823, when he was dismissed. The ordination sermon was preached by Nathan Perkins, Jr., A. M., pastor of the Second Church in Amherst, Mass., from Isaiah LXII, 6-7. — “I have set watchmen upon thy walls, Jerusalem, which shall never hold their peace day nor night; ye that make mention of the Lord, keep not silence, and give him no rest till he establish, and till he make Jerusalem a praise in the earth.” Mr. Bailey was afterwards settled in Pittsfield, Mass., and later became president of Austin College, Texas. The church, which consisted at its organization of only eleven members, was quite small at the outset, increased during the ministry of Mr. Bailey to an aggregate of forty-seven members. After the dismissal of Mr. Bailey, the pulpit was supplied by Reverends James W. Woodward and J. R. Wheelock, and by Reverend Doctor Roswell Shurtleff till December, 1831, when Reverend Thomas Hall was installed pastor and continued with the church about three years. Under the ministry of...

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First Settlements in Norwich Vermont

Having glanced thus briefly at the action of the Norwich proprietors in opening a way to reach their new township in the wilderness, and in dividing up a portion of its surface into lots suitable to become the homesteads of future settlers, let us pause a moment and see what had meantime been done in the work of actual settlement. I am indebted to Rev. Edmund F. Slafter of Boston for an interesting account of what was unquestionably the first attempt at settlement made within the limits of the town. I quote from the Slafter Memorial: “Samuel Slafter [of Mansfield, Connecticut], the father of John Slafter, being an original proprietor, and being at the first meeting chosen treasurer of the corporation, took a deep interest in the settlement of the town. At his suggestion, his son John made a journey through the forests of New Hampshire in 1762, to examine the territory and report upon the advantages it might offer as a place of settlement. He found it pleasantly situated on the western banks of the Connecticut, with a good soil, but for the most part of an uneven, hilly surface. He reported it well watered, not only by the Connecticut but by several small, clear streams, and by one more important one called the Ompompanoosuc, an Indian name signifying ‘the place of very white stones’ whose waters emptied...

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Early Residents of Benton, Montana

Prominent among the citizens of Benton and Montana is John M. Boardman, a native of Illinois, where he was born on Dec. 2, 1855. He received a commercial training in the great wholesale house of Marshall, Field, & Co., of Chicago, where he held a responsible position for several years. In 1879 he removed to Montana, where he engaged in the cattle business in the vicinity of Fort Benton. In 1885 he merged his stock in the Milner Livestock Co., whose herds are among the largest in the state. As vice-president and manager of this company he has contributed largely to its prosperity, and aided perhaps more than any single individual in building the cattle interests of northern Montana. As an instance of his popularity, it may be mentioned that he was elected in 1889 to the first state legislature of Montana, and was also the first republican elected in Choteau County to any legislative office. C. E. Conrad was born in Virginia City in 1850, and there was raised and educated. At the age of 18 years he came to Montana, arriving at Fort Benton June 30, 1868. He began life here as a clerk in the employ of J. G. Baker & Co., of which he is now a member. In 1882, when the First National bank of Fort Benton was organized, of which W. G. Conrad...

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Biographical Sketch of C. D. Boardman

C.D. Boardman, physician and druggist, was born at Potsdam, St. Lawrence County, N.Y., in 1854; moved with parents to Lyons, Clinton county, Ia.; there attended school, and in 1871 entered the Agricultural College, of Ames. He graduated in 1874 and in the winter of same year entered the Chicago Medical College, from which he graduated in the spring of 1877. The same year he opened an office at Monticello, Ia., also engaged in the drug business, in partnership with Dr. Mellett; at the end of one year Dr. Boardman became sole proprietor. In May, 1880, he moved the stock to Odebolt and established his present...

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Biographical Sketch of Manly B. Boardman

Manly B. Boardman, Justice of the Peace, insurance, loan and real estate agent, was born in Geneva, N. Y., in 1830. His parents moved to Vienna, N. Y., when he was an infant. When fourteen years old, he began clerking in a general store in Genesee County, N. Y., remaining there four years; he then went to Buffalo, where he obtained employment as clerk in a wholesale and retail store two years; he was afterward employed in other towns in New York, and finally obtained employment in a wholesale house in New York City, afterward becoming a partner and continuing there until 1870, when he moved to Caldwell County, Mo., engaging in farming one year; he then moved to Nebraska, locating near Albion, where he has since resided. He has 160 acres, ninety acres being under cultivation. He is one of the Justices of the Peace of Manchester Precinct; was elected on the Republican ticket in 1879, and re-elected in 1881; he held the same office from January 1, 1876, to January 1, 1878, when he declined to accept the office another term. He is also extensively engaged in the insurance business, having a number of the best companies doing business in the State, and is also employed as land examiner for capitalists loaning money in the vicinity of Albion. He was married, in Brooklyn, N. Y., in 1854,...

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Biography of Edgar W. Boardman, M. D.

Edgar W. Boardman, M. D. Medicine is constantly making tremendous strides forward, with scientific progress shown on every side, and discoveries and inventions are practically changing methods of practice and broadening the viewpoint of both physician and patient. To practice according to the enlightened ideas of the present century requires not only a most careful training but a certain, sure aggressiveness, and no physician of Parsons has this and other admirable qualities in greater degree than has Dr. Edgar W. Boardman, a practicing physician and surgeon of this city since 1888. Doctor Boardman was born at Fort Dodge, Iowa, January 10, 1864, and is a son of Dr. H. E. and Susan C. (Locke) Boardman. The Boardmans originated in England, from which country two brothers came to America at an early day in the history of the American Colonies, one locating in Connectient and the other in Vermont. The old Boardman Hill, at Rutland, Vermont, was a family possession for upwards of 200 years, and it is from this branch that Doctor Boardman is descended. His grandfather was Elijah Boardman, born in 1792, at West Rutland, a farmer by occupation who spent his entire life there and died in 1875. Dr. H. E. Boardman was born in 1835, at West Rutland, Vermont, and was given the advantages of an excellent educational training. He graduated from Middlebury (Vermont) College with...

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