Surname: Baxter

Migration of Families out of Norwich VT

At the first enumeration of the inhabitants of eastern Vermont, as made by the authority of New York in 1771, Norwich was found to be the most populous of all the towns of Windsor County, having forty families and 206 inhabitants. Windsor followed with 203, and Hartford was third with 190. The aggregate population of the county (ten towns reported) was then but 1,205, mostly confined to the first and second tiers of towns west of the Connecticut River. Twenty years later, in 1791, Hartland led all the towns of the county with 1,652 inhabitants, Woodstock and Windsor coming next with 1,605 and 1,542 respectively. Exceptional causes made the little town of Guilford (now numbering scarcely more than one thousand inhabitants), till after the year 1800, the most populous town in the state. In Norwich, the great falling off in the size of families in recent years is seen in the fact, that in the year 1800, the number of children of school age was 604, out of a total population of 1,486, while in 1880 with a nearly equal population (1,471) it was but 390. In the removal of large numbers of the native-born inhabitants by emigration, we must find the principal cause of the decline of our rural population. Preeminently is this true of Norwich. The outflow of people began very early and now for more than...

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History of Norwich Vermont Education

From the town records it appears that the first attempt to divide the town into school districts, was at a town meeting held November 19, 1782, when John Slafter, Elijah Brownson, Ithamar Bartlett, Joseph Loveland, Paul Bingham, Joseph Hatch, Daniel Baldwin, Abel Wilder and Samuel Brown, Jr., were made a committee for that purpose. Soon thereafter the committee reported that they “could effect nothing on the business of their appointment,” and were discharged. No further move in town meeting towards districting the town for school purposes appears to have been made until March 30, 1785, when, on petition of...

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Norwich Vermont in the Revolutionary War

The sources of information in regard to the part taken by the town in the Revolutionary struggle are few and scanty. The earliest allusion in the town records to this important epoch of the country’s history is found in the election of a Committee of Safety at the annual town meeting, March 11, 1777. This committee was five in number: Deacon Joseph Smalley, Samuel Hutchinson, John Hatch, Captain Hezekiah Johnson and John Hopson. There is much reason to believe, however, that this was not the first Committee of Safety that acted for the town; but was a new committee selected to conform to a recommendation made to the towns in Cumberland and Gloucester Counties by the Convention at Westminster which declared the independence of Vermont the preceding January. 1Governor and Council, Vol. I, p. 47. It is pretty certain that a company of militia was organized in Norwich as early as the year 1774 or 1775. Of this company Peter Olcott was chosen Captain and Thomas Murdock, Ensign, doubtless by the votes of the men enrolled in the same. The company was probably a purely voluntary organization of patriotic young men, in Colonel Seth Warner‘s regiment of Rangers in 1775, in the continental service. Colonel Timothy Bedell, of Haverhill, N. H., also raised a regiment the same year for service in Canada. Fresh regiments were enlisted early in the...

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First Settlements in Norwich Vermont

Having glanced thus briefly at the action of the Norwich proprietors in opening a way to reach their new township in the wilderness, and in dividing up a portion of its surface into lots suitable to become the homesteads of future settlers, let us pause a moment and see what had meantime been done in the work of actual settlement. I am indebted to Rev. Edmund F. Slafter of Boston for an interesting account of what was unquestionably the first attempt at settlement made within the limits of the town. I quote from the Slafter Memorial: “Samuel Slafter [of Mansfield, Connecticut], the father of John Slafter, being an original proprietor, and being at the first meeting chosen treasurer of the corporation, took a deep interest in the settlement of the town. At his suggestion, his son John made a journey through the forests of New Hampshire in 1762, to examine the territory and report upon the advantages it might offer as a place of settlement. He found it pleasantly situated on the western banks of the Connecticut, with a good soil, but for the most part of an uneven, hilly surface. He reported it well watered, not only by the Connecticut but by several small, clear streams, and by one more important one called the Ompompanoosuc, an Indian name signifying ‘the place of very white stones’ whose waters emptied...

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Letter from John Baxter to Robert Love

Knoxville, Tennessee. My Dear Sir: September 2nd, 1861 Your letter of the 29th July did not reach me before I left for Richmond. What detained it I do not know. But on my return I received and read it with great interest. By it, I see that you had properly appreciated my position. From what I had heard, you had misconceived my views, but I seen now that you had not. With the strongest possible convictions against the policy and propriety of Secession, I have ever exerted by influence to preserve peace in East Tennessee, and, as I think, with no little success. You will see the result in Nelson’s card to the people of East Tennessee. I approached him as a friend and opened up the way to convictions without which he most probably would not have made the concessions which seemed to be indispensable as a prerequisite to his release. By degrees he came to the opinions entertained by me, and by common consent, we both made a step forward, acknowledged the country divided and consented in our own minds to yield to a necessity-to an evil which we could not arrest. The result you will see in his card, which was submitted to me and approved by me in manuscript. Under this connection that the country was inevitably divided, I have been assiduously laboring since my...

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Biography of Alexander B. Baxter

Alexander Brown Baxter, chief of police, and Colonel of the 24th Battalion volunteer infantry, was born in the city of Edinburgh, Scotland, June 7, 1831, his parents being Alexander and Elizabeth (Hogg) Baxter. His father was Lieutenant in the 25th and 43rd infantry; served in the Light Division of the army (under the Duke of Wellington), in Spain; and twice in the invasion of France, in the Netherlands and Ireland, and was rewarded with a medal for his services. He retired on half pay after the battle of Waterloo, but was subsequently appointed second oldest Captain of the Venezuela regiment of Horse Lancers, raised in Holland for service in South America, yet did not serve. In 1835, he brought his family to Canada; had granted to him lands on the river St. Clair and at Chatham; served in the rebellion of 1837 ’38, commanding the Bear Creek Rifles, and died in Chatham in 1871, aged eighty-one years. He married Elizabeth Hogg, of Jedburgh, Roxburgshire, Scotland, and a relative of the “Ettrick Shepherd.” One of his ancestors once owned the property, afterwards purchased by Sir Walter Scott, and named Abbottsford, so called because at an earlier period the Abbotts of Melrose Abbey there had a ford across the Tweed. Col. Baxter received a common school education while the family were residing on the St. Clair river; clerked in a dry...

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Biography of Jacob Baxter, M. D., M. P. P.

Jacob Baxter, who has represented Haldimand in the Provincial Legislature since the Dominion was formed, is a son of Jacob and Susan (Hershey) Baxter, both natives of Canada, and was born in the Township of Bertie, County of Welland, June 6, 1832. He is a grandson of John Baxter, who emigrated from Ireland near the close of the 18th century, settled in Bertie, and was a captain in the war of 1812-14, being in the battle of Fort Erie, and other engagements. The wounded at Fort Erie were taken to the barn of Captain Baxter, four miles away, to have their wounds dressed. Jacob Baxter, senior, was a former Reeve of the Township of Bertie, a man of considerable local influence, and a leader in agricultural matters, establishing the first agricultural society in that township, and dying in 1855. Our subject was educated in common and select schools, and by private tuition; studied his profession at the Toronto School of Medicine; became a licentiate of the Provincial Medical Board in 1853; the following winter attended a course of lectures in the Medical Department of the University of New York, and in 1866, a course at the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, same city, receiving the degree of M.D. from both institutions. Dr. Baxter has been in practice in Cayuga for a quarter of a century, and enjoys a high reputation...

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Biographical Sketch of J. F. Baxter

J. F. Baxter, station agent and conductor, was born at Sidney Plain, N.Y., in 1833; moved to Rockford, Ill., in 1851 and engaged in mercantile business. In 1861 he moved to Wheatland, Ia.; thence to Marshalltown, in 1874, and in September, 1879, came to Sac City and took charge of the depot. He makes two trips a day as conductor, and during his absence the depot is charge of Frank L. Stayner, operator. Mr. Baxter is agent for the American express...

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Slave Narrative of Katie Arbery

Interviewer: Mrs. Bernice Bowden Person Interviewed: Katie Arbery Location: 815 W. Thirteenth, Pine Bluff, Arkansas Age: 80 “I am eighty years old. My name ‘fore I was a Arbery was Baxter. My mother was a Baxter. Born in Union County. “My mother’s first people was Baxter and my grandmother was a Baxter and they just went by that name; she never did change her name. “The boss man—that was what they called our master—his name was Paul McCall. He was married twice. His oldest son was Jim McCall. He was in the War. Yes ma’am, the Civil War. “Paul McCall raised me up with his chillun and I never did call him master, just called him pappy, and Jim McCall, I called him brother Jim. Just raised us all up there in the yard. My grandmother was the cook. “There wasn’t no fightin’ in Union County but I ‘member when the Yankees was goin’ through and singin’ ‘The Union forever, hurrah, boys, hurrah We’ll rally ’round the flag, boys, Shouting the battle cry of freedom.’ (She sang this—ed.) And I ‘member this one good: ‘Old buckwheat cakes and good strong butter To make your lips go flip, flip, flutter. Look away, look away, look away, Dixie land.’ “Pappy used to play that on his fiddle and have us chillun tryin’ to dance. Used to call us chillun and say,...

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Biography of Edson Baxter

Edson Baxter. Now serving as clerk of the District Court at Marion, Captain Baxter is an old timer of Kansas and had lived in close touch with the developments of half a century and his own part therein allows him to speak with authority on the history of that period. The Baxter family came to Kansas in territorial times and did their pioneering in Morris County. Edson Baxter was fifteen years of age when he accompanied the family caravan overland, and he was able to make himself useful from the very beginning of the settlement. He was born on a farm in Lasalle County, Illinois, October 8, 1842, a son of June and Elizabeth (Lenox) Baxter. He is a descendant of the noted English divine, Richard Baxter. June Baxter, his father, was born near West Point, New York, June 30, 1805. In early life he learned the trade of blacksmith, and from New York went to Illinois. In 1858 he brought his family with wagons and teams westward from Central Illinois and located on land which he pre-empted in Morris County, Kansas. The rest of his active years were spent there as a farmer, and he died May 20, 1890. When the Baxter family settled in Morris County the settlers lived chiefly along the creeks. Law and order were not securely established, and besides some Indian seares the population...

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Biography of James Baxter

Captain James Baxter, of Boise, is a native of England, his birth having occurred in Norwich. His parents were Frank and Mary (Gunn) Baxter, who came with their family to the United States when the Captain was very young. They resided near New York City for some years, and then removed to Paterson, New Jersey. The father was a horticulturist by occupation and successfully engaged in the cultivation of vegetables and flowers. Soon after his arrival in America he took steps toward becoming naturalized and was recognized as a valued and influential citizen. He served as county commissioner in New Jersey for a number of years, and was also county sheriff, in which positions he discharged his duties with signal ability. After a residence of thirty years in America, he died at the age of seventy-eight. His widow still survives him, and at the age of eighty-seven years is living in Paterson, New Jersey, where she has so long made her home. She was the mother of thirteen children, seven of whom grew to years of maturity and are still living. In the public schools of New York City James Baxter began his education, which he continued in Paterson. Subsequently he attended the school of mines at Columbia College, New York, and was graduated there as a mining engineer and metallurgist. He learned the machinist’s trade with the Rogers...

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Baxter, Rex D. – Obituary

Enterprise, Oregon Rex D. Baxter, of Dayton, Wash. died Nov. 16, 2006. He was 55. Mr. Baxter was born Oct. 15, 1951. He graduated from Enterprise High School. He was employed as a Fishery Biologist and worked for the Army Corps of Engineers in Walla Walla, Wash. He is survived by his wife Debbie, daughter Emily, son Steven, mother Marjorie M. Baxter of Enterprise, brothers Greg Baxter of Bend, Gary Baxter of Troutdale and Terence Baxter of Walla Walla, Wash. plus other relatives and friends. A memorial service will be held at Dayton, Wash. on Nov. 25, 2006. Wallowa County Chieftain, January 23,...

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Baxter, Joan – Obituary

Enterprise, Oregon Joan W. Baxter of Troutdale died at the home of her daughter in Camas, Wash., on Jan. 13, 2006. She was 67. Survivors include her husband, Gary L. Baxter of Troutdale, sons Michael Baxter and his wife Becky of Sunnyvale, Calif., Glenn Baxter and his wife Marissa of Los Gatos, Calif., David Baxter of Baltimore, Md., Jeff Baxter of Kirkland, Wash., Brian Baxter of Dallas, Tex., daughters Amy and her husband Jeff Van de Water of Warner Robins, Ga., Heather and her husband John Aldrich of Camas, Wash., her mother-in-law Marjorie M. Baxter of Enterprise, six grandchildren and numerous other relatives. A memorial service will be held at Enterprise Christian Church Jan. 20 at 1 p.m. Wallowa County Chieftain, January 19,...

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Baxter, Ida Gertrude Loney – Obituary

October 3 at 1321 Isaacs, Mrs. Ida Gertrude Baxter of 59 South Palouse aged 60. Wife of John A. Baxter of Walla Walla; mother of C. Richard Baxter of Walla Walla; sister of Sam Loney, W. D. Loney, Charles C. Loney and Mrs. C. L. Ramp all of Walla Walla; Mrs. Robert Potts of Sprague and Mrs. Katie Paul of Everett. Born April 21, 1878 at Ontario, Wellington County, Canada. Member of Christian Science Church. Member of Christian Science Church. Remains at Marshall, Calloway & Hennessey. Funeral notice later. [Interment Mountain View Cemetery] Walla Walla Union Bulletin, October 4, 1938 Contributed by: Shelli...

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Baxter, Doris Arlene – Obituary

La Grande, Oregon Doris Arlene Baxter, 76, of La Grande died Aug. 27 at a local care center. Viewing will be from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday at Loveland Funeral Home, 1508 Fourth St. The funeral will begin at 11 a.m. Saturday at the LDS Chapel in Union. Burial will follow at the Union Cemetery. Mrs. Baxter was born Jan. 13, 1930, to Lester and Mary Daggett in Minam. She graduated from Union High School, and on March 13, 1951, she married Bryce Wight Baxter in the Temple in Idaho Falls, Idaho. They raised their family in North Bend where she was a homemaker. She was a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and enjoyed cooking, crochet and crafts. Survivors include children, Duane Baxter and Chris Baxter, both of La Grande, Reed Baxter and Trisha Baxter, both of Eugene, and Kevin and Blaine Baxter and Kathy Price, all of Salt Lake City; 23 grandchildren; 13 great-grandchildren; and two sisters, Donna Brodhead of North Powder and Blanche Hutchison of Walla Walla. Her husband died earlier. Memorials may be made to Grande Ronde Hospice or the LDS Family History Center in care of Loveland Chapel. The Observer Online, Obituaries for the week ending Sept. 2, 2006, Published: September 5,...

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