Surname: Bailey

Biography of Jasper N. Bailey

Jasper N. Bailey was born in Carter county, Kentucky, June 8, 1838; a son of Jesse and Margaret Bailey, nee Webb. His father, by profession, was a teacher, and died in the year 1848; and his mother died December 16, 1876. When he was two years of age his parents left Kentucky and came to Lawrence county, Ohio. After being there six years they came to Daviess county, Missouri. When about seventeen years of age he left home to see the world for him-self and went to New Mexico and remained one year, then returned to Missouri and remained till 1857 when he took his mother to California. They started to drive through with ox-teams, but after getting into Kansas his mother was taken sick and the trip abandoned. He next staked a claim in Brown county, Kansas, and remained two years, then, 1859, spent one year in Colorado, after which he returned to Missouri, and October 10, 1863, enlisted as a member of Company G, First Missouri State Cavalry Militia and served till the close of the war. On February 12th, 1863, he was married to Miss Martha Miller, a native of Breckinridge county, Kentucky, and born July 3, 1847. Her parents, Michael and Martha Miller came to Missouri and located in DeKalb county; her father died in 1869, and her mother in 1879. They have had seven...

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Biography of Luther Chapin Bailey

During his residence at Topeka since 1889 Mr. Bailey had developed a large insurance business, had been a citizen in whom public spirit is one of the most important qualities, and to his many personal friends is known as a man of charming sociability and of exceptional interest. He was born near Waynetown, Indiana, September 23, 1866, a son of Horatio Jackson Bailey and Leah Jane (Gartrell) Bailey, his wife. His great-grandfather, George Bailey, was a Scotchman, and married a Scotch woman from North Ireland. He migrated to the State of Delaware and settled on Chesapeake Bay, and here at this home the grandfather, Horatio Bailey, was born. This Horatio Bailey was a soldier in the War of 1812, and married Sarah Ann Hearst. The Hearst family was a numerous one, living on Chesapeake Bay, in the State of Delaware. Many of them followed the sea, and George Hearst, the great-grandfather, was privateersman in the war of the Revolution, and earned distinction for valorous service. Horatio Jackson Bailey, father of the Topeka citizen, was a minister, having removed to Indiana from Ohio. His wife, Leah Jane Gartrell, was descended from a French Huguenot family that long lived in Virginia. The Gartrells were among the first families of Virginia, were planters on a large scale and before the war owned many slaves. The Gartrells came into Virginia from the southern...

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Biographical Sketch of Ward Howard Bailey, M.D.

Ward Howard Bailey was born May, 1848, at Waldon, Scott County, Arkansas, the second son of Dr. W. H. Bailey, who was appointed physician of the missionary schools of the Creek Nation, and moved to the country with his family in 1852, remaining till the outbreak of the war, when he returned to Fort Smith in 1862. Young Bailey, who was educated in the Kentucky School of Medicine, first commenced practice at old North Fork Town, in the Creek Nation. When the railroad was built he removed to Eufaula, and in 1878 married Miss Ella Stidham, eldest daughter of Col. G. W. Stidham by his second wife, Miss Thornberry, of Washington City. Col. Stidham was the most prominent man of his day among the Creeks. By this marriage Dr. Bailey had two children, Georgia Ella, aged six years, and Ward Howard, aged three years. The doctor is a man of superior education, and a fine physician, having had twenty-one years’ experience among the Creeks, among whom he is exceedingly...

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Biographical Sketch of T. G. Bailey

The firm of Billingsley & Bailey was formed November 4, 1885, by S. A. Billingsley & T. G. Bailey. The senior member of firm is a native of Bledsoe County, Tenn., born October 31, 1856, and was reared in his native county. His father was a farmer. Our subject engaged in merchandising for two years at Spencer, Tennesse, before coming here. February 1884, he went to Mulberry and there engaged in teaching, being principal of the schools at that place until June 4, 1886, when he resigned. December 16, 1885, he married Jennie Sugg, of Cyruston, Lincoln Co., Tennessee. The father of Mr. Billingsley was a minister, and his grandfather was a member of the first Tennessee Legislature. The father of our subject died in 1878, and his mother is still living. Mr. Bailey, junior member of the firm, was born in the present limits of Moore County, and is a son of Thomas R. and Nancy M. (Edwards) Bailey, natives of North Carolina and Alabama respectively. The father was a farmer, and died April 4, 1884; the mother still survives. Mr. Bailey engaged as clerk in a store in Lynchburg, for two years, and then formed a partnership with T. H. Parks & Co., continuing with that firm until December, 1882. He held an interest in R. B. Parks & Co. store until March 10, 1884, when he...

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Biographical Sketch of M. I. Bailey

M.I. Bailey, attorney at law, established business in 1875. He was born in Delaware County, N.Y., in 1847; removed to Missouri Valley, Ia., in 1875, and engaged in the practice of law. He married C.L. Ames; a native of N.Y. Mr. B. is the present mayor of this...

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Biographical Sketch of Artemas Bailey

Artemas Bailey was born in Lunenburg, Mass., January 17, 1800, and married Clarissa Billings. He was a book-binder, and carried on that business in his native place for several years. He moved with his family to Keene, in 1830, and worked at the same business here for several years. He had three children, two of whom, Lizzie A. and Adaline S., live in Keene. He died November 7, 1865, and his widow died February 2,...

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Biography of De Roos Bailey

Of the younger element of our prominent, energetic and influential citizens, none are better known than De Roos Bailey, one of the distinguished attorneys of the northwestern part of Arkansas, whose home is at Harrison. During the years that he has practiced his profession here he has shown that he is endowed with superior ability, and his comprehensive knowledge of the law, together with the soundness of his judgment, secured his almost immediate recognition at the bar. Since that time to the present he has so identified himself with the affairs of his section that its history can-not be recorded without according him a conspicuous and honorable part. He was born in Carroll County, Arkansas, May 27, 1857, and traces his ancestry back to his great-great-grandfather, William Bailey, who came to this country from England many years prior to the Revolution and is supposed to have settled in one of the Carolinas. His son, William, however, was born in Virginia, from which State he enlisted in the Colonial Army during the Revolutionary War, at the age of sixteen years; he died at the advanced age of eighty-six years. John Bailey, the grandfather of De Roos Bailey, was born in the Old North State, and was the first to establish the Bailey family in Tennessee. At a very early day he came with his wife, Beersheba (Cunningham) Bailey, to Arkansas...

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Slave Narrative of Margrett Nickerson

Interviewer: Rachel A. Austin Person Interviewed: Margrett Nickerson Location: Jacksonville, Florida Age: 89-90 In her own vernacular, Margrett Nickerson was “born to William A. Carr, on his plantation near Jackson, Leon County, many years ago.” When questioned concerning her life on this plantation, she continues: “Now honey, it’s been so long ago, I don’ ‘meber ev’ything, but I will tell you whut I kin as near right as possible; I kin ‘member five uf Marse Carr’s chillun; Florida, Susan, ‘Lijah, Willie and Tom; cose Carr never ‘lowed us to have a piece of paper in our hands.” “Mr. Kilgo was de fust overseer I ‘member; I was big enough to tote meat an’ stuff frum de smokehouse to de kitchen and to tote water in and git wood for granny to cook de dinner and fur de sucklers who nu’sed de babies, an’ I carried dinners back to de hands.” “On dis plantation dere was ’bout a hunnerd head; cookin’ was done in de fireplace in iron pots and de meals was plenty of pea, greens, cornbread burnt co’n for coffee – often de marster bought some coffee fur us; we got water frum de open well. Jes ‘fore de big fun fiahed dey fotched my pa frum de bay whar he was makin’ salt; he had heard dem say ‘de Yankees is coming and wuz so glad.” “Dere...

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Biography of Willis J. Bailey

Willis J. Bailey, who was governor of Kansas from 1903 to 1905, had been a resident of the state since 1879 and had long stood as a leader in agricultural affairs, as a banker, and as a member of the republican party. His home is now in the City of Atchison, where he is vice president and managing officer of the Exchange National Bank. His administration as governor of Kansas is made the subject of some paragraphs in an appropriate place on other pages of this history. The following is intended merely as a¬†biographical¬†statement of his career and with some notice of his varied and effective interests as a Kansan. Willis J. Bailey was born at Mount Carroll, Illinois, October 12, 1854, and is of New England ancestry and descended from a long line of whigs and republicans. The Baileys came out of England and were colonial settlers in Massachusetts prior to the year 1640. Governor Bailey’s grandfather, Joshua Bailey, was born in 1780 and served in the War of 1812 as a member of Captain Tomlinson’s company. For many years he lived on a farm in Warren County, New York, but in 1845 moved out to Mount Carroll, Illinois, and continued farming in that community until his death in 1870. He was a whig during the existence of that party, and then became a republican. He was one...

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Biographical Sketch of Fred S. Bailey

Fred S. Bailey, member of the well known Bailey family of Champaign, now vice president of the Champaign National Bank, was born at Champaign April 19, 1871, and is a son of Captain Edward Bailey, one of the founders of the bank who is elsewhere mentioned in these pages. Mr. Bailey attended the common and high schools of Champaign, graduating from the latter in 1889, and continued his studies at the University of Illinois until failing health obliged him to leave. For a year he worked in Colorado for an uncle and having recovered his health returned to Champaign and entered the Champaign National Bank as a clerk. He has been through all the grades of service and is now vice-president of that institution. Mr. Bailey is a charter member of the Elks Lodge at Champaign and in politics is a Republican. He was married August 12, 1901, to Miss Mabel Bennett, a native of Pontiac, Illinois. Her parents removed to Champaign in 1892 and her father was formerly agent of the Illinois Central Railway here and afterwards in the land business in Mississippi. Both her parents are now...

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Biography of David Bailey

David Bailey. In the latter part of 1854 or the early part of 1855 Mr. Bailey moved to Monticello, Illinois. After a short sojourn there he came to Urbana, and in March or April, 1856, moved to Champaign, where for a number of years, in connection with W. B. Bailey, he conducted a small country store in a frame building that he erected on the site now occupied by the Robeson Department Store. David Bailey was one of the thirteen men who founded the First National Bank of Champaign, in 1865. Application for organization was made to the government in January, 1865, and certificate was issued in April, 1865. The thirteen men signing up were in the following order: J. S. Wright, J. H. Thomas, W. M. Way, Hamilton J. Jefferson, B. F. Harris, J. S. Beasley, David Bailey, Daniel Gardner, W. C. Barrett, Simeon H. Busey, S. P. Percival, J. G. Clark and A. E. Harmon. Each took fifty shares, making a capital of sixty-five thousand dollars. David Bailey disposed of his interest in the bank some time in the ’70s. In 1882 he, with other men, founded the Champaign National Bank. The nine men signing the organization certificate and present at the organization were: Edward Bailey, 110 shares; Wm. S. Maxwell, 100 shares; Jas. C. Miller, 150 shares; Bernard Kelley, 40 shares; David Bailey, 60 shares; Isaac...

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Biography of Captain Edward Bailey

Captain Edward Bailey is president of the Champaign National Bank, an institution which has become noted as one of the most conservative in the United States and as a leader among the great banking institutions of Illinois. He was one of its founders. He was born at Bloomfield, Edgar County, Illinois, September 8, 1843, a son of David and Hannah (Finley) Bailey, concerning whom mention is made on other pages. His early education was obtained in subscription schools at Bloomfield. In the last part of 1854 or early in 1855 his parents moved to Monticello, Illinois, thence to Urbana, Illinois, and in the spring of 1856 to Champaign, where he attended the public schools. In 1858 and 1859 he was a student at Atkinson Academy, Atkinson, New Hampshire. In the fall of 1860 he entered Douglas University in Chicago. This was the nucleus of the old Chicago University, which still later was founded and chartered as the University of Chicago. When the Civil War broke out in 1861 an independent military company was formed in this school. As a member of that company Edward Bailey learned the regulation drill and became very proficient therein. When Stephen A. Douglas died this company had the position of honor in the funeral procession and at the grave. In 1862 he enlisted in Company K, Sixty-seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and was elected first...

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Biography of Ernest N. Bailey

Ernest N. Bailey, a brother of former Governor W. J. Bailey, reference to whom is made on other pages, had largely concentrated his efforts and businees enterprise at the Town of Baileyville, named for the family, in Nemaha County. Mr. Bailey had been an extensive farmer and stockman, and in later years a grain merchant, and owned the principal grain elevator at Baileyville. He was born in Carroll County, Illinois, June 15, 1857. The Bailey ancestry is English and the Baileys were Colonial settlers in New York. His grandparents, Joshua and Eleeta Bailey, were both born in or near Tieonderoga, New York. Joshua was born in 1790, and during the ’40s took his family West to Carroll County, Illinois, and acquired some of the rich and unbroken land in that section. He lived there as a farmer until his death in 1870, and his wife, Electa, died in the same county. Monroe Bailey, father of Ernest N. and Governor Bailey was born on the shores of Lake George, New York State, in 1818. He was a young man when he went West to Carroll County, Illinois, and from there came to Kansas in July, 1879. In November of that year he acquired land on the prairie where Baileyville now stands. and he and his family founded the town there, which is built on a part of the original Bailey...

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Slave Narrative of Jeff Bailey

Interviewer: Samuel S. Taylor Person Interviewed: Jeff Bailey Location: 713 W. Ninth Street, Little Rock, Arkansas Age: 76 or 77 Occupation: Hostler [HW: A Hostler’s Story] “I was born in Monticello. I was raised there. Then I came up to Pine Bluff and stayed there thirty-two years. Then I came up here and been here thirty-two years. That is the reason the white folks so good to me now. I been here so long, I been a hostler all my life. I am the best hostler in this State. I go down to the post office they give me money. These white folks here is good to me. “What you writing down? Yes, that’s what I said. These white folks like me and they good to me. They give me anything I want. You want a drink? That’s the best bonded whiskey money can buy. They gives it to me. Well, if you don’t want it now, come in when you do. “I lost my wife right there in that corner. I was married just once. Lived with her forty-three years. She died here five months ago. Josie Bailey! The white folks thought the world and all of her. That is another reason they give me so much. She was one of the best women I ever seen. “I gits ten dollars a month. The check comes right up...

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Biography of Wilshire Bailey

Mr. Bailey was born in the State of Alabama, in the year 1824, and came to Texas with his parents in the year 1835. He married Miss Gage, a daughter of E. N. Gage, in the year 1852. To this union were born 8 children, seven of whom are still living, five girls and two boys. His boys are both married and are thrifty and well to do farmers and tax payers. Four of his daughters are married, their husbands are farmers and stock raisers, are good men, upright and honest in their business relations, and have the confidence of the people. Air. Bailey has led a very active life, he is a typical Texan, open hearted, outspoken and impulsive, will fight at the drop of the hat, is a good clever fellow, knows everybody, and everybody knows him. He has a good strong mind, but little education. He likes to be in a crowd, and can talk against a brass band. He has one daughter living with him, a nice young lady, somewhat reserved, yet pleasant and agreeable in her manners, she is very much devoted to her aged parents and attached to her country home, a beautiful locations on the prairie, so situated as to have a lovely view of all the country for miles around. Mr. Bailey’s father stopped when he came to Texas in the...

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