Collection: Indian Treaties Acts and Agreements

Treaty of September 20, 1818

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Treaty with the Wyandot, Sept. 20, 1818. Articles of a treaty made and concluded, at St. Mary’s, in the state of Ohio, between Lewis Cass, Commissioner of the United States, thereto specially authorized by the President of the United States, and the chiefs and warriors of the Wyandot tribe of Indians. Article I. The Wyandot tribe of Indians hereby cede to the United States all the right reserved to them in two tracts of land, in the territory of Michigan, one including the village called Brownstown, and the other the village called Maguagua, formerly in the possession of the Wyandot tribe of Indians, containing in the whole not more than five thousand acres of land; which two tracts of land were reserved for the use of the said Wyandot tribe of Indians, and their descendants, for the term of fifty years, agreeably to the provisions of the act of Congress, passed February 28, 1809, and entitled “An act for the relief of certain Alabama and Wyandot Indians.” Article II. In consideration of the preceding cession, the United States will reserve, for the use of the said Wyandott Indians, sections numbered twenty-three, twenty-four, twenty-five, twenty-six, thirty-four, thirty-five, thirty-six, twenty-seven, and that part of section numbered twenty-two, which contains eight acres, and lies on the south side of...

Read More

Treaty of July 22, 1814

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A treaty of peace and friendship between the United States of America, and the tribes of Indians called the Wyandots, Delawares, Shawanoese, Senecas, and Miamies. The said United States of America, by William Henry Harrison, late a major general in the army of the United States, and Lewis Cass, governor of the Michigan territory, duly authorized and appointed commissioners for the purpose, and the said tribes, by their head men, chiefs, and warriors, assembled at Greenville, in the state of Ohio, have agreed to the following articles, which, when ratified by the president of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate thereof, shall be binding upon them and the said tribes. Article 1. The United States and the Wyandots, Delawares, Shawanoese, and Senecas, give peace to the Miamie nation of Indians, formerly designated as the Miamie Eel River and Weea tribes; they extend this indulgence also to the bands of the Putawatimies, which adhere to the Grand Sachem Tobinipee, and to the chief Onoxa, to the Ottawas of Blanchard’s creek, who have attached themselves to the Shawanoese tribe, and to such of the said tribe as adhere to the chief called the Wing, in the neighborhood of Detroit, and to the Kickapoos, under the direction of their chiefs who sign...

Read More

Treaty of August 11, 1820

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A treaty made and concluded by Benjamin Parke, a Commissioner for that purpose on the part of the United States, of the one part; and the Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the Wea tribe of Indians, of the other part. Article I. The Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the said Tribe, agree to cede, and they do hereby cede and relinquish, to the United States all the lands reserved by the second article of the Treaty between the United States and the said Tribe, concluded at Saint Mary’s, on the second day of October, eighteen hundred and eighteen. Article II. The sum of five thousand dollars, in money and goods, which is now paid and delivered by the United States, the receipt whereof the Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the said Tribe, do hereby acknowledge, is considered by the parties a full compensation for the cession and relinquishment above mentioned. Article III. As it is contemplated by the said Tribe, to remove from the Wabash, it is agreed, that the annuity secured to the Weas, by the Treaty of Saint Mary’s, above mentioned, shall hereafter be paid to them at Kaskaskia, in the state of Illinois. Article IV. This Treaty, as soon as it is ratified by the President and Senate of the...

Read More

Treaty of June 4, 1816

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of a treaty made and entered into at Fort Harrison, in the Indiana Territory between Benjamin Parke, specially authorized thereto by the president of the United States, of the one part, and the tribes of Indians called the Weas and Kickapoos, by their chiefs and head men, of the other part. Article I. The Weas and Kickapoos again acknowledge themselves in peace and friendship with the United States. Article II.The said tribes acknowledge the validity of, and declare their determination to adhere to, the treaty of Greenville, made in the year seventeen hundred and ninety-five, and all subsequent treaties which they have respectively made with the United States. Article III. The boundary line, surveyed and marked by the United States, of the land on the Wabash and White rivers, ceded in the year eighteen hundred and nine, the said tribes do hereby explicitly recognize and confirm, as having been executed conformably to the several treaties they have made with the United States. Article IV. The chiefs and warriors of the said tribe of the Kickapoos acknowledge that they have ceded to the United States all that tract of country which lies between the aforesaid boundary line on the north west side of the Wabash-the Wabash, the Vermillion river, and a line to be drawn from...

Read More

Treaty of November 1, 1837

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of a treaty made at the city of Washington, between Carey A. Harris, thereto specially directed by the President of the United States, and the Winnebago nation of Indians, by their chiefs and delegates. Article I.The Winnebago nation of Indians cede to the United States all their land east of the Mississippi river. Article II.The said Indians further agree to relinquish the right to occupy, except for the purpose of hunting a portion of the land held by them west of the Mississippi, included between that river and a line drawn from a point twenty miles distant there from on the southern boundary of the neutral ground to a point, equidistant from the said river, on the northern boundary thereof. But this stipulation shall not be so construed, as to invalidate their title to the said tract. Article III.The said Indians agree to remove within eight months from the ratification of this treaty, to that portion of the neutral ground west of the Mississippi, which was conveyed to them in the second article of the treaty of September 15th, [21st] 1832, and the United States agree that the said Indians may hunt upon the western part of said neutral ground until they shall procure a permanent settlement. Article IV.In consideration of the cession and relinquishment...

Read More

Treaty of September 15, 1832

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of a treaty made and concluded, at Fort Armstrong, Rock Island, Illinois, between the United States of America, by their Commissioners, Major General Winfield Scott of the United States’ Army, and his Excellency John Reynolds, Governor of the State of Illinois, and the Winnebago nation of Indians, represented in general Council by the undersigned Chiefs, Headmen, and Warriors. Article I.The Winnebago nation hereby cede to the United States, forever, all the lands, to which said nation have title or claim, lying to the south and east of the Wisconsin river, and the Fox river of Green Bay; bounded as follows, viz: beginning at the mouth of the Pee-keetol a-ka river; thence up Rock river to its source; thence, with a line dividing the Winnebago nation from other Indians east of the Winnebago lake, to the Grande Chûte; thence, up Fox river to the Winnebago lake, and with the northwestern shore of said lake, to the inlet of Fox river; thence, up said river to lake Puckaway, and with the eastern shore of the same to its most southeasterly bend; thence with the line of a purchase made of the Winnebago nation, by the treaty at Prairie du Chêne, the first day of August, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-nine, to the place of beginning. Article...

Read More

Treaty of June 3, 1816

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A treaty of peace and friendship made and concluded between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and Auguste Chouteau, commissioners plenipotentiary of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said states, of the one part, and the undersigned chiefs and warriors of that portion of the Winnebago tribe or nation residing on the Ouisconsin river, of the other part. Whereas the undersigned chiefs and warriors, as well as that portion of the nation which they represent, have separated themselves from the rest of their nation, and reside in a village on the Ouisconsin river, and are desirous of returning to a state of friendly relations with the United States, the parties hereto have agreed to the following articles. Article I. Every injury or act of hostility, committed by one or either of the contracting parties against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot; and all the friendly relations that existed between them before the late war, shall be, and the same are hereby, renewed. Article II. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and those they represent, do by these presents, confirm to the United States all and every cession of land heretofore made by their nation to the British, French, or Spanish government, within the limits of the United States, or...

Read More

Treaty of August 1, 1829

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of a treaty made and concluded at the Village of Prairie du Chien, Michigan Territory, on this first day of August, in the year one thousand eight hundred and twenty-nine, between the United States of America, by their Commissioner, General John M’Neil, Colonel Pierre Menard, and Caleb Atwater, Esq., for and on behalf of said States, of the one part, and the Nation of Winnebaygo Indians of the other part. Article I. The said Winnebaygo nation hereby, forever, cede and relinquish to the said United States, all their right, title, and claim, to the lands and country contained within the following limits and boundaries, to wit: beginning on Rock River, at the mouth of the Pee-kee-tau-no or Pee-kee-tol-a-ka, a branch thereof; thence, up the Pee-kee-tol-a-ka, to the mouth of Sugar Creek; thence, up the said creek, to the source of the Eastern branch thereof; thence, by a line running due North, to the road leading from the Eastern blue mound, by the most Northern of the four lakes, to the portage of the Wisconsin and Fox rivers; thence, along the said road, to the crossing of Duck Creek; thence, by a line running in a direct course to the most Southeasterly bend of Lake Puck-a-way, on Fox River; thence, up said Lake and Fox River,...

Read More

February 28, 1891 Amendment

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now 1891 AmendmentAn Act to Amend and Further Extend the Benefits of the Act Approved February Eighth, Eighteen Hundred and Eighty-Seven, Statutes at Large 26, 794-96, Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That section one of the act entitled “An act to provide for the allotment of lands in severalty to Indians on the various reservations, and to extend the protection of the laws of the United States and the Territories over the Indians, and for other purposes,” approved February eighth, eighteen hundred and eighty-seven, be, and the same is hereby, amended so as to read as follows: SEC. 1. That in all cases where any tribe or band of Indians has been, or shall hereafter be, located upon any reservation created for their use, either by treaty stipulation or by virtue of an Act of Congress or Executive order setting apart the same for their use, the president of the United States be, and he hereby is, authorized, whenever in his opinion any reservation, or any part thereof, of such Indians in advantageous for agricultural or grazing purposes, to cause said reservation to, or any part thereof, to be surveyed, or resurveyed, if necessary, and to allot to each Indian located thereon one-eighth...

Read More

Dawes Act

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now General Allotment Act or Dawes Act An Act to Provide for the Allotment of Lands in Severalty to Indians on the Various Reservations (General Allotment Act or Dawes Act), Statutes at Large 24, 388-91,      Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That in all cases where any tribe or band of Indians has been, or shall hereafter be, located upon any reservation created for their use, either by treaty stipulation or by virtue of an act of Congress or executive order setting apart the same for their use, the President of the United States be, and he hereby is, authorized, whenever in his opinion any reservation or any part thereof of such Indians is advantageous for agricultural and grazing purposes, to cause said reservation, or any part thereof, to be surveyed, or resurveyed if necessary, and to allot the lands in said reservation in severalty to any Indian located thereon in quantities as follows: To each head of a family, one-quarter of a section; To each single person over eighteen years of age, one-eighth of a section; To each orphan child under eighteen years of age, one-eighth of a section; and To each other single person under eighteen years now living, or who...

Read More

Treaty of September 17, 1858

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Preliminary Articles of a Treaty of Peace and Friendship Between the United States and the Coeur d’Alene Indians Article 1. Hostilities between the United States and the Coeur d’Alene Indians shall cease from and after this date, September 17, 1858. Article 2. The chiefs and headmen of the Coeur d’Alene Indians, for and in behalf of the whole nation, agree and promise to surrender to the United States all property in their possession be longing either to the government or to individuals, whether said property was captured or abandoned by the troops of the United States. Article 3. The chiefs and headmen of the Coeur d’Alene nation agree to surrender to the United States the men who commenced the battle with Lieutenant Colonel Steptoe, contrary to the orders of their chiefs, and also to give at least one chief and four men, with their families, to the officer in command of the troops as hostages for their future good conduct. Article 4. The chiefs and headmen of the Coeur d’Alene nation promise that all white persons shall travel through their country unmolested, and that no Indians hostile to the United States shall be allowed within the limits of their country. Article 5. The officer in command of the United States troops, for and in behalf of...

Read More

Treaty of October 18, 1820

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A treaty of friendship, limits, and accommodation, between the United States of America and the Choctaw nation of Indians, begun and concluded at the Treaty Ground, in said nation, near Doak’s Stand, on the Natchez Road. Whereas it is an important object with the President of the United States, to promote the civilization of the Choctaw Indians, by the establishment of schools amongst them; and to perpetuate them as a nation, by exchanging, for a small part of their land here, a country beyond the Mississippi River, where all, who live by hunting and will not work, may be collected and settled together.-And whereas it is desirable to the state of Mississippi, to obtain a small part of the land belonging to said nation; for the mutual accommodation of the parties, and for securing the happiness and protection of the whole Choctaw nation, as well as preserving that harmony and friendship which so happily subsists between them and the United States, James Monroe, President of the United States of America, by Andrew Jackson, of the State of Tennessee, Major General in the Army of the United States, and General Thomas Hinds, of the State of Mississippi, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States, on the one part, and the Mingoes, Head Men, and Warriors, of the Choctaw...

Read More

Treaty of January 20, 1825

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of a convention made between John C. Calhoun, Secretary of War, being specially authorized therefore by the President of the United States, and the undersigned Chiefs and Head Men of the Choctaw Nation of Indians, duly authorized and empowered by said Nation, at the City of Washington, on the twentieth day of January, in the year of our lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty-five. Whereas a Treaty of friendship, and limits, and accommodation, having been entered into at Doake’s Stand, on the eighteenth of October, in the year one thousand eight hundred and twenty, between Andrew Jackson and Thomas Hinds, Commissioners on the part of United States, and the Chiefs and Warriors of the Choctaw Nation of Indians; and whereas the second article of the Treaty aforesaid provides for a cession of lands, west of the Mississippi, to the Choctaw Nation, in part satisfaction for lands ceded by said Nation to the United States, according to the first article of said treaty: And whereas, it being ascertained that the cession aforesaid embraces a large number of settlers, citizens of the United States; and it being the desire of the President of the United States to obviate all difficulties resulting there from and also, to adjust other matters in which both the United States and...

Read More

Treaty of July 6, 1825

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now For the Purpose of perpetuating the friendship which has heretofore existed, as also to remove all future cause of discussion or dissension, as it respects trade and friendship between the United States and their citizens, and the Chayenne tribe of Indians, the President of the United States of America, by Brigadier-General Henry Atkinson, of the United States’ army, and Major Benjamin O’Fallon, Indian agent, with full powers and authority, specially appointed and commissioned for that purpose of the one part, and the undersigned Chiefs, Headmen and Warriors, of the Chayenne tribe of Indians, on behalf of said tribe, of the other part, have made and entered into the following Articles and Conditions; which, when ratified by the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall be binding on both parties—to wit: Article I. It is admitted by the Chayenne tribe of Indians, that they reside within the territorial limits of the United States, acknowledge their supremacy, and claim their protection,—The said tribe also admit the right of the United States to regulate all trade and intercourse with them. Article II. The United States agree to receive the Chayenne tribe of Indians into their friendship, and under their protection, and to extend to them, from time to time, such...

Read More

Treaty of April 27, 1868

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Supplemental article to a treaty concluded at Washington City, July 19th, A. D. 1866; ratified with amendments, July 27th, A. D. 1866; amendments accepted, July 31st, A. D. 1866; and the whole proclaimed, August 11th, A. D. 1866, between the United States of America and the Cherokee Nation of Indians. Whereas under the provisions of the seventeenth article of a treaty and amendments thereto made between the United States and the Cherokee Nation of Indians, and proclaimed August 11th, A. D. 1866, a contract was made and entered into by James Harlan, Secretary of the Interior, on behalf of the United States, of the one part, and by the American Emigrant Company, a corporation chartered and existing under the laws of the State of Connecticut, of the other part, dated August 30th, A. D. 1866, for the sale of the so-called “Cherokee neutral lands,” in the State of Kansas, containing eight hundred thousand acres, more or less, with the limitations and restrictions set forth in the said seventeenth article of said treaty as amended, on the terms and conditions therein mentioned, which contract is now on file in the Department of the Interior; and Whereas Orville H. Browning, Secretary of the Interior, regarding said sale as illegal and not in conformity with said treaty and amendments...

Read More

Search

Free Genealogy Archives


It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest