Collection: People of One Fire

Native American History of Fayette County, Georgia

Fayette County is located in west central Georgia and is part of the Atlanta Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA.) It is named after the French Revolutionary War hero, Marie-Joseph Paul Yves Roch Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de La Fayette. Its county seat is Fayetteville. Fayette County is also home to one of the United States’ most successful planned cities, Peachtree City. Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY INTL Start Now Fayette is bounded on the north by Fulton County and on the northeast by Clayton County. Henry County forms a relative short segment of its eastern boundary. Spalding County is located to the south, while Coweta County forms its western boundary. Line Creek forms the county’s entire western boundary, while the Flint River forms its eastern boundary. Geology and hydrology All of Fayette County drains into the Flint River and eventually the Gulf of Mexico. However, many of its creeks join the Flint River south of the county’s boundaries. The county is only a few miles west of the...

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Native American History of Floyd County, Georgia

Floyd County located in northwest Georgia. It is part of the Rome, GA Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA.) Its county seat is Rome. It is named after John Floyd, a member of the U. S. House of Representatives representing a district in Georgia. John Floyd was born in Beaufort, SC and was a carpenter when he moved to northeastern Georgia. Upon the outbreak of the CreekCivil War in 1813, Floyd was named a Brigadier General in command of the First Brigade of Georgia Militia, plus 400 Georgia Creeks. Floyd led his army to one victory at the Redstick village of Autose, where he was severely wounded. The Georgia Regiment saw very little action afterward. Nevertheless, Floyd’s brief service soon led to him being elected to Congress. Another Georgia regiment composed entirely of Creeks, Cherokees and Yuchi, led by a Creek Brigadier General William McIntosh, saw extensive combat throughout the Redstick War. Floyd County is bordered on the north by Walker County, GA and the northeast by Gordon County, GA. Bartow County, GA adjoins Floyd on the east side. Cherokee County, AL adjoins Floyd on its western side. Polk County, GA forms its southern boundary. Chattooga County, GA forms Floyd’s northwestern boundary. Rome contains one of Georgia’s largest inventories of 19th century historical buildings and sites. Being located in the confluence of the Etowah, Oostanaula and Coosa Rivers, it was...

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Native American History of Forsyth County, Georgia

Forsyth County located in northern Georgia. It is part of the Atlanta Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA.) Its county seat is Cumming. It is named after John Forsyth, Governor of Georgia from 1827–1829 and Secretary of State under Presidents Andrew Jackson and Martin Van Buren. Forsyth County is bordered on the north by Dawson County and the east by Hall County. Lake Lanier now covers the two counties boundary. Gwinnett County forms a short southwestern boundary of Forsyth. The section of Fulton County that was formerly Milton County adjoins Forsyth on the southwest. Cherokee County forms the northwestern border of Forsyth. Geology and hydrology Forsyth County is located in the Upper Piedmont and Blue Ridge foothills geological regions, which are characterized by underlying rock strata of igneous and metamorphicized igneous rock. Forsyth County contains some small to medium height mountains (for the Southeast.) These mountains do not form continuous ridges. The terrain of the county generally consists of rolling hills and valleys or ravines formed by streams. Saunee Mountain dominates the skyline of the central part of the county. The sections of the Chattahoochee and Chesnatee Rivers passing through Forsyth County once had some alluvial flood plains, but these were all covered by Lake Sydney Lanier in the early 1950s. There are a few permanent or seasonal wetlands paralleling the streams that flow into the Chattahoochee. The Etowah River...

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Native American History of Coweta County, Georgia

Coweta County is located in west central Georgia and is part of the Atlanta Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA.) Its name is the English version of the Creek Indian town named Kowitv, which was formerly located on the Chattahoochee River, either in Coweta or adjacent Carroll County. Coweta’s county seat is Newnan. Coweta County is bounded on the northeast by Fulton County and on the northwest by the Chattahoochee River and Carroll County. Heard County forms its western boundary. Line Creek and Fayette County forms its eastern boundary. Meriwether County is to the south of Coweta. Spalding County forms a relatively short boundary on the southeast, while Troup County is located to the southwest. Geology and hydrology Coweta County is located in the Piedmont geological region, which is characterized by underlying rock strata of igneous and metamorphicized igneous rock. The terrain consists of rolling hills, stream valleys and some relatively level plateaus in the area around Newnan. Seasonal or permanent wetlands parallel many of its streams. These are relatively narrow bands of soggy terrain that provide ecological diversity for animal and plant life. The top soils are thin over most hills and steep slopes, while much deeper near streams. Short-sighted cultivation techniques in the 19th and early 20th century caused much of the best top soil to be eroded; thus exposing red clay sub-soil. Sandy loam can still be...

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Native American History of Dawson County, Georgia

Dawson County located in northern Georgia. It is part of the Atlanta Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA.) Its county seat is Dawsonville. It is named after William Crosby Dawson, a U.S. Senator from Georgia. The southern terminus of the Appalachian Trail is located in Dawson County at Amicalola State Park. Up until the late 20th century, Dawson County was associated with the illegal moonshine industry and stock car racing, which the moonshine industry spawned. Dawson County is bordered on the north by Fannin County, the northeast by Lumpkin County and the east by Hall County. Forsyth County is located south of Dawson. Cherokee County forms it southwest boundary. Pickens County forms its western boundary. Gilmer County adjoins Dawson on its northwest side. Geology and hydrology Dawson County is located in the Blue Ridge Foothills and Blue Ridge Mountains geological regions, which are characterized by underlying rock strata of igneous and metamorphicized igneous rock. Dawson County contains some small to medium height mountains (for the Southeast.) These mountains do not form continuous ridges. The terrain of most of the county generally consists of rolling hills and valleys or ravines formed by streams. The Blue Ridge Escarpment runs across the northern edge of Dawson. It is characterized by steep slopes, deep ravines and elevations up to 3.620 feet above sea level on the top of Black Mountain. Alluvial flood plains along...

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Native American History of Decatur County, Georgia

Decatur County is named after War of 1812 naval hero, Commodore Stephen Decatur. Its county seat is Bainbridge. It is located in the far southwestern corner of Georgia and adjoins Florida. Decatur County is bounded on the north by Miller County, GA. On the northeast, it is bounded by Mitchell and Baker Counties, GA.  Its western boundary is formed by the Flint and Chattahoochee Rivers. On the east, it is bordered by Grady County, GA. On the west, it is bordered by Seminole County, GA. On the south, it is bordered by the Florida State Line and Gadsden County, FL. Geology and hydrology Decatur County is located in the Upper Gulf Coastal Plain. In most areas of the Gulf Coastal Plain the terrain is almost level with sandy loam soils. The Florida Aquifer is located beneath the surface in porous sedimentary rock strata. The soils located in stream former Miocene, Pliocene and Holocene swamplands (25 million to 2,000 years ago) can be extremely fertile. Because of their sandy structure, they were particular attractive to Native American farmers, who only had crude stone and bone tools with which to till the soil. In Decatur County, these sandy loam soils primarily occur on a series of terraces rising from the Flint River and in narrow bands along major streams. All of Decatur County drains into either the Flint or Chattahoochee Rivers....

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Native American History of DeKalb County, Georgia

DeKalb County located in northern Georgia. It is named after Hans Kalb, a German adventurer, who falsified his name to be Baron Johann de Kalb, when volunteering to serve in the Continental Army during the American Revolution. He died in the Battle of Camden, SC in 1781. All of DeKalb County is part of the Atlanta Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA.) Its county seat is Decatur. Approximately, 10% of the City of Atlanta is located in DeKalb County. DeKalb in the location of Stone Mountain and the Centers for Disease Control. The CDC and adjacent Emory University compose one of the most important biological research complexes in the world. DeKalb is bordered on the west and northwest by Fulton County. Gwinett County forms its northeastern boundary. Rockdale County forms the southeastern boundary. Clayton County forms its southern boundary. Geology and hydrology DeKalb County was located in the Upper Piedmont geological region, which is characterized by underlying rock strata of igneous and metamorphicized igneous rock. The Upper Piedmont terrain generally consists of rolling hills and stream valleys, but in some areas can seem semi-mountainous. This is because high mountains once stood at these locations, but have eroded to large hills through the eons. Stone Mountain is the heavily eroded core of an ancient volcano. It is composed of granite and related igneous rocks. The South River forms in East Point,...

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Native American History of Dodge County, Georgia

Dodge County is located in south-central Georgia. It is named after William E. Dodge (1805– 1883) – a New York capitalist, congressman, abolitionist, carpetbagger, philanthropist and Native American advocate. Its county seat is Eastman. The existence of Dodge County is the direct result of a group of investors, led by Dodge, accumulating over 300,000 acres in south central Georgia during the early days of Reconstruction. Deeds to the properties were often obtained through illegalities made possible by martial law in a defeated land. After Dodge’s death, law suits pertaining to the land acquisitions, continued for over fifty years. Dodge used his influence on the Reconstruction state government in Atlanta to convert his property holdings into a new county in 1870. He also obtained a franchise to construct a railroad from Macon, GA to Brunswick, GA through his fiefdom. William Dodge played a very important role in the Indian reforms of the 1870s. He was co-founder of the United States Indian Commission and lobbied for many years to create a separate cabinet level Department of Indian Affairs. Ironically, his seizure of properties along the Ocmulgee River with unclear titles or delinquent property taxes, forced many Creek Indian families off lands they had lived on since the early 1700s. Dodge’s consortium used a Trail of Tears Era law in Georgia which forbade Indians from owning real estate or testifying in court...

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Native American History of Cobb County, Georgia

Cobb County located in northwestern Georgia. It is part of the Atlanta Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA.) Its county seat is Marietta. Located at the southern tip of the Appalachians, the county contains several isolated mountains. Kennesaw Mountain, in particular, is visible from much of the northwest Atlanta suburbs. Cobb County is bounded on the northeast by Cherokee County and on the northwest by Bartow County. The section of Fulton County that was formerly Milton County forms its eastern boundary. Paulding County forms its western boundary, while Douglas County forms is southwestern boundary. In 1932 Milton County (on the north) and Campbell County (on the south,) merged with Fulton County. Cobb County ceded the City of Roswell and a section of land along Willeo Creek to Fulton, in order to make the original section of Fulton contiguous with Milton. Geology and hydrology Cobb County is officially located in the Upper Piedmont geological region, which is characterized by underlying rock strata of igneous and metamorphicized igneous rock. However, it contains several mountains, so some sections of the county are identical in appearance to the Southern Appalachians. The Upper Piedmont terrain generally consists of rolling hills and stream valleys, but can seem semi-mountainous. This is because high mountains once stood at these locations, but have eroded to large hills through the eons. The section of the Chattahoochee River passing Cobb County...

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Native American History of Clayton County, Georgia

Clayton County is located in west central Georgia and is part of the Atlanta Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA.) It is named after Augustin Smith Clayton (1783-1839) who represented a section of Georgia in the United States House of Representatives between 1832 and 1835. Its county seat is Jonesboro. Clayton is bounded on the northeast by DeKalb County and on the northwest by Fulton County. Henry County forms a short segment of its eastern boundary. Spalding County is located to the south, while Fayette County forms its southwestern boundary. Geology and hydrology The western 2/3 of Clayton County drains into the Flint River and eventually the Gulf of Mexico. The eastern 1/3 of the county is drained by streams that flow into the South River, a tributary of the Ocmulgee River, eventually reaching the Atlantic Ocean, after the Ocmulgee joins the Oconee to form the Altamaha River. Clayton County is located in the Piedmont geological region, which is characterized by underlying rock strata of igneous and metamorphicized igneous rock. The terrain consists of rolling hills, stream valleys and some relatively level plateaus along the eastern Continental Divide that runs north-south from Forest Park to Jonesboro.. Seasonal or permanent wetlands parallel many of its streams and the Flint River. These are relatively narrow bands of soggy terrain that provide ecological diversity for animal and plant life. The top soils are...

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Native American History of Clay County, Georgia

Clay County is named after United States Senator Henry Clay of Kentucky/ Clay was also a Secretary of State and Speaker of the House three times, while a Representative. The county seat of Clay County is the town of Fort Gaines. Clay County is bounded on the north by Quitman County, GA. On the south, it is bordered by Early County, GA. The county’s western boundaries are formed by the Chattahoochee River, the Alabama State Line, Henry County, AL and, Barbour County, AL. On the east, it is bordered by Calhoun County, GA. On the northeast, it is bordered by Randolph County, GA. Geology and hydrology Clay County is located in the Upper Gulf Coastal Plain. In most areas of the Gulf Coastal Plain the terrain is almost level with sandy loam soils. The soils located in stream former Miocene, Pliocene and Holocene swamplands (25 million to 2,000 years ago) can be extremely fertile. Because of their sandy structure, they were particular attractive to Native American farmers, who only had crude stone and bone tools with which to till the soil. In Clay County, these sandy loam soils primarily occur on a series of terraces rising from the Chattahoochee River and in narrow bands along major streams. The Chattahoochee Red Clay Hills run through the eastern portion of Clay County. Here, there are ravines created by streams flowing westward...

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Native American History of Cherokee County, Georgia

Cherokee County located in northern Georgia. It is part of the Atlanta Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA.) Its county seat is Canton. It is named after the Cherokee Indians. Cherokee County is bordered on the north by Pickens County and the northeast by Dawson County. Forsyth County adjoins Cherokee on its eastern side. The section of Fulton County that was formerly Milton County forms its southeastern boundary, while Cobb County forms its southern boundary. Bartow County forms most of its western boundary, while Gordon County forms a short section of Cherokee’s Geology and hydrology Cherokee County is located in the Upper Piedmont, Blue Ridge foothills and Pine Log Mountains geological regions. The first two regions are characterized by underlying rock strata of igneous and metamorphicized igneous rock. The Pine Log Mountains are the result of an ancient geological boundary known as the Cartersville Fault. Extremely ancient rocks were pushed up through the fault when a section of a continental plate that was part of Africa collided with the North American plate. That section of the North American plate was covered with sedentary rocks. The Pine Log Mountains contain many minerals and semi-precious stones. In the late 1800s and early 1900s iron ore was mined commercially. Mines for semi-precious stones continued operation until the late 20th century. The Pine Log Mountains consist of small to medium height peaks reaching up...

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Native American History of Chattahoochee County, Georgia

Chattahoochee County is located in west central Georgia and is part of the Columbus, GA Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. It was named after the Chattahoochee River. Most of Chattahoochee County is occupied by Fort Benning, one of the U. S. Army’s largest facilities. The county seat of Chattahoochee County is the town of Cusseta. Cusseta is the anglicized version of the name of an important division of the Creek Indian Confederacy, the Kvse-te; pronounced Ka(u-jzhe(-te-. Kvse-te is an Itza Maya word, written as Kaax’i-te in Mexico, which means “People of the Forested Mountains.” When Savannah was settled in 1732, the British Colonists called the Kvse-te, the Kashita. The popular explanation of the meaning of Chattahoochee is that it is Creek word meaning, “River with the shining rocks.” This is probably not accurate. Until the late 1700s, there was a large Creek town with several mounds, where Six Flags Over Georgia is now located. In the Itsate (Hitchiti-Creek) language, it was named Cata-hvci (pronounced Chata-hawchee,) which literally means “Red River” in Itsate-Creek. The river at this town site is often clay red and contains no visible stones. When most of the Creeks were forcibly deported to the Indian Territory (Oklahoma,) they called a principal river through their lands, the Red River. Chattahoochee County is bounded on the north by Muskogee County, GA. On the northeast, it adjoins Talbot County, GA....

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Native American History of Campbell County, Georgia

Old Campbell County was located in west central Georgia. The county was named for Duncan G. Campbell, one of the state commissioners present at the signing of the Treaty of Indians Springs in 1825. In 1870 Douglass County was cut off from Campbell, but later renamed Douglas. The original county seat was Campbellton on the Chattahoochee River. However, shortly after the Atlanta & West Point Railroad was laid through the village of Fairburn, Fairburn became the county seat. Campbell was annexed by Fulton County in 1931. All of Fulton County is part of the Atlanta Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA.) Old Campbell County was bounded on the west by Carroll and Douglas Counties. On the east, it adjoined the Chattahoochee River and Fulton County, GA that was formerly Milton County. On the southeast it was bordered by Fayette and Clayton Counties. Coweta County formed its southern boundary, while the original portion of Fulton formed its northern boundary. Geology and hydrology Old Campbell County was located in the Piedmont geological region, which is characterized by underlying rock strata of igneous and metamorphicized igneous rock. The terrain consists of rolling hills and stream valleys. There are some extensive alluvial plains along the Chattahoochee River. Seasonal or permanent wetlands parallel many of its streams. These are relatively narrow bands of soggy terrain that provide ecological diversity for animal and plant life. The...

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Native American History of Carroll County, Georgia

Carroll County is located in west central Georgia and is part of the Atlanta Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA.) It was named after Charles Carroll of Maryland, the last surviving signer of the Declaration of Independence. It is the home of the State University of West Georgia. Much of the plantation, owned by Creek mekko, William McIntosh is now a public park known as the McIntosh Reserve. The park includes McIntosh’s grave and a reproduction of his two story, dog-trot style log house. Carroll County is bounded on the northeast by Douglas County, GA. On the east, it adjoins a short boundary with a section of Fulton County, GA that was formerly Milton County. On the southeast, it is bordered by the Chattahoochee River and Coweta County, GA. Heard County adjoins Carroll on the south. The county’s western boundaries are formed by Cleburne County, AL and Randolph County, AL. Haralson County, GA forms its northwestern boundary. Geology and hydrology Carroll County is located in the Piedmont geological region, which is characterized by underlying rock strata of igneous and metamorphicized igneous rock. The terrain consists of rolling hills, stream valleys and some relatively level plateaus in the area of the county west of Newnan. Seasonal or permanent wetlands parallel many of its streams. These are relatively narrow bands of soggy terrain that provide ecological diversity for animal and plant life....

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