Collection: Indian Home Guard

Department of Interior Reports 1A – 5A

No. 1 A. FORT GIBSON. C. N., August, 1, 1865. DEAR SIR: I have, been here for a month attending to business for the Cherokees and Creeks, particularly for bark pay of deceased soldiers and pensions for widows. The three Indian regiments were mustered out the 31st of May, 1865, and each company had a white lieutenant, and I am the attorney for them all. It is reported here that these lieutenants and others are now making out papers in Kansas to draw the pay of deceased soldiers and the bounty of those who were not paid, and that General Blunt is certifying to such claims as well as others. I write this to request you to withhold all action on any claims of these regiments of Indian Home Guards until my arrival in Washington, which will be about the 1st of October. My authority is derived from the Indians, officers, and soldiers, the chiefs, and the United States Indian agents. Judge Harlan, Dunn, and Coleman are here. and are well qualified to fill those places. As to Mr. Sell, I will say nothing until I see you. Yours, JOHN W. WRIGHT. Hon. JUSTIN HARLIN. No. 2 A. Department Of The Interior, Washington, D. C. July 11, 1866. SIR: It having come to my knowledge that it considerable number of Cherokees, Creeks, and other Indians have appointed you their...

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Letter, Department of the Interior

Department of the Interior, Washington D. C., April 30, 1872. SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of the following resolution, adopted by the House of Representatives, December 11, 1871: Resolved, That the Secretary of the Interior be, and he is hereby, directed to transmit to this House copies of all letters, telegrams, and reports of special agents and other official papers or records of the Department pertaining to the payment of bounties, back pay, and pensions to the First, Second, and Third Regiments of Indian Home Guards, together with copies of all letters in the ease taken from the pension agency at Fort Gibson, Arkansas, (Indian Territory.) The voluminous papers herewith transmitted, will, I trust, be a sufficient apology for the delay in forwarding reply. I have the honor to submit herewith copies of the documents called for, which for convenience of reference have been numbered. I also present, as briefly as the nature of the case will admit, a statement of the causes which led to the condition of things set forth in those documents, and the action of the Department from time to time relative thereto. Indian Troops During the war of the rebellion a number of the residents of the Indian Territory, members of the various tribes therein located, were organized into regiments for military service in the armies of the United States,...

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Alleged Frauds Against Certain Indian Soldiers

June 8,¬†1872.¬óLaid on the table and ordered to he printed. Mr. BURDETT, from the Committee on Indian Affairs, made the following REPORT The Committee on Indian Affairs to whom were referred the sundry papers, documents, and memoranda appertaining to certain transactions of John W. Wright and others with members of the First, Second, and Third Regiments Indian Home Guards, submitted to Congress by the Secretary of the Interior, with his letter of April 30, 1872, in response to the following House resolution: “Resolved, That the Secretary of the Interior be, and he is hereby, directed to transmit to this House copies of all letters, telegrams, and reports of special agents and other official papers or records of his Department pertaining to the payment of bounties, back pay, and pensions to the First, Second, and Third Regiments of Home Guards, together with copies of all letters in the case, taken, from the pension agency at Fort Gibson, Arkansas;” submit the following report: That from the voluminous papers submitted by the Secretary of the Interior, and the complicated nature of the transactions involved, they have not found it possible, in the limited time allowed for their consideration, to make such a critical examination of the case as to enable them to lay before the House a full report of their conclusions in the matters involved; nor do they think it necessary,...

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Pension Nakey, widow of C. Georges

Fort Gibson, Indian Territory, January 9, 1871. SIR: Herewith please find claim of Nakey, widow of C. Georges, Ap. No. 138,405, with papers, including declaration and additional evidence as to service and death of soldier, and marriage and widowhood of claimant, sworn to and attested this day, and the papers previously filed by J. W. Wright, with a memorandum indorsed upon the ticket of said claim, which was transcribed from the report of the Adjutant General under date of November, 1865, now on file in your office, upon rolls of the said Adjutant General furnished at said time, comprising record of the enlistment, casualties, discharges, &c., of all the soldiers of the three Indian Home-Guard regiments known to have been enrolled. No further evidence being available in support of said claim hereat, the same is respectfully submitted for the claimant as it is. It is deemed unnecessary to add more concerning said claim, except that the claimant cannot procure the better evidence of marriage, and that the medical records at this post, where he died, are so defective as to preclude the possibility of ascertaining more certainly the cause of her husband’s death. Herewith please find also an affidavit of Albert Barnes, a copy of which we retain for future use, which will be found interesting by reason of the light it sheds upon the manner of preparation of...

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Declaration and Testimony of Nancy Jumper, widow of Jumper

Fort Gibson; Indian Territory, February 15, 1871. Sir: We enclose herewith additional declaration and testimony in the case of Nancy Jumper, widow of Jumper, application No. 110,510. If evidence as to birth of children of the character furnished is to be accepted, we recommend the allowance of this claim with increase. We have, as in all cases, fixed the date of birth at as early a day as it could have occurred consistently with the allegations of claimant and witnesses. The witnesses-George O. and Jesse Sanders-are intelligent men, speaking English fluently, and were both, as Jesse now is, neighbors of the claimant prior to the war. The discrepancies appearing in the declarations simply illustrate the method pursued by the attorney in conducting his business, and are no more glaring than usual. Respectfully, yours, GEO. E. WEBSTER, F. E. FOSTER, Special Agents United States Pension-Office. Hon. II. VAN AERNAM, Commissioner of Pensions. Widow’s declaration Indian Territory, Cherokee Nation, ss: On this 15th day of February, A. D. 1871, before me, George E. Webster, pension agent at Fort Gibson, in the nation aforesaid, personally appeared Nancy Jumper, a resident of Tahlequah district, Cherokee Nation, who being by me duly sworn, according to law, makes the following declaration, in order to obtain the benefits of the acts of Congress granting pensions to widows: That she is about forty-one years of age, and...

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Pension Lieutenant Alexander F. Barnes

Fort Gibson, Indian Territory, January 10, 1871. Sir: Albert Barnes, clerk of the Illinois district court, Cherokee Nation, as representative of the heirs of Lieutenant Alexander F. Barnes, deceased, late of Company M, Fourteenth Kansas Cavalry, desires us to inquire relative to the claim for back pay of said officer, and to ascertain the testimony required to establish the same. Among the papers put in our possession as relating to said claim appears the enclosed blank declaration, which, as the judge’s signature appears to be genuine, is transmitted as a further illustration of the manner in which the judiciary of this country is conducted. Please furnish us the information desired by Mr. Barnes. Respectfully, yours, GEO. E. WEBSTER, F. E. FOSTER, Special Agents Pension-Office, Hon. E. B. FRENCH, Second...

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Inquiry, Widow and Children of Stean Walker

Fort Gibson, Indian Territory, February 9, 1871. SIR: Please inform me whether there is a widow and children of Stean Walker, formerly of Company H, Second Indian Home Guards, living; whether the widow has been married since the death of her husband, said soldier; if she has been remarried, at what date, and what are the ages of the children of the soldier, now living, who were under sixteen years old when he died; and if his widow has died, at what date she died.. This is written at the suggestion of Mr. J. B. Jones, Indian agent for Cherokees. Respectfully, yours, F. E. FOSTER, Special Agent United States Pension-Office. Captain SIMON SNELL,...

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Inquiry, Widow and Children of Arch. Sanders

Fort Gibson, Indian Territory, February 9, 1871. MADAM: At the suggestion of Rev. J. B. Jones, Indian agent for, Cherokees, I have to request that you will inform us, so far as you can, as to the widow and children of Arch. Sanders, formerly of Company L, Third Indian Home Guards, who is said to have been your son. Has the widow remarried or died since the death of the soldiers; if either, at what date? Did he leave children under sixteen at the time of his death; if so, please give their names, and the dates of their births, and the dates of their deaths, if any have died. Respectfully, yours, F. E. FOSTER, Special Agent United States Pension-Office Mrs. PEGGY WOODALL, Cincinnati,...

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Inquiry, Widow and Children of Lituwaki

Fort Gibson, Indian Territory, February 9, 1871. SIR: At suggestion of Rev. J. B. Jones, Indian agent for Cherokees, I have to request that you will inform us whether the widow of Lituwaki, formerly private of Company G, Second Indian Home Guards, has remarried or died since the death of the soldier, and if either, at what date, and whether he left any children who were under sixteen when he died, and if any of said children have died, and at what date, as well as the dates of birth of all of them. Yours, respectfully, F. E. FOSTER, Special Agent United States Pension-Office FROG SIX-KILLER, Cincinnati,...

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Inquiry, Widow and Children of Samuel Sanders

Fort Gibson, Indian Territory, February 9, 1871. SIR: At suggestion of Rev. J. B. Jones, Indian agent for Cherokees, I have to request that you will inform us, so far as you can, whether the widow of Samuel Sanders, formerly a private of Company E, Second Indian Home Guards, has remarried or died since the soldier’s death, and if either at what date; also, if he left any children who were under sixteen at the time of his death; if so the dates of their birth, and the dates of their death if any have died. Respectfully, yours, F. E. FOSTER, Special Agent United States Pension-Office JOHN SHELL, Cincinnati,...

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Inquiry, Widow and Children of Ta-qua-yah Wolf

Fort Gibson, Indian Territory, February 9, 1871. SIR: At suggestion of Rev. J. B. Jones, I have to request that you will inform us of the date of remarriage of the late widow of Ta-qua-yah Wolf, formerly a soldier in Company H, Second Indian Home Guards, and whether she is still living; also if the soldier left any children under sixteen at the time of his death; their names, and dates of birth, and, if any have died, the dates of death, and who is the authorized guardian of those living. Respectfully, yours, F. E. FOSTER, Special Agent United States Pension-Office. JOHNSON THOMPSON,...

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