Collection: Historical and Biographical Record of Douglas County Illinois

Biography of Edward W. Calvin

Edward W. Calvin, the leading druggist and owner of both livery stables of Newman, was born in Wayne County, Illinois, December 21, 1860. He is a son of Dr. J. W. Calvin, who was born in Kentucky in 1829, and he the son of Hiram Calvin, who was a native of Virginia. His father was a graduate of Rush Medical College. He married Sarah Brown, of New Buffalo, Michigan, whose death occurred some twenty years ago. He has practiced at various places, was at Newman one year and is at present in active and successful practice at Toledo, Ohio. Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY INTL Start Now E. W. Calvin has for several years extensively engaged in buying and selling horses and has been remarkably successful in all business enterprises in which he has been interested. In June, 1897, he opened out in the drug business and keeps on hands one of the most complete assortments of drugs found in a first-class drug store. In 1889 he was...

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Biography of I. W. Burgett

I. W. Burgett, deceased, was, during his residence in Douglas County, one of its leading and most successful farmers. From the time he was ten years old he spent the whole of his eventful life in Sargent Township. He is a descendant of English and German ancestors, who were among the early residents of Ohio. His grandfather was in the war of 1812. His father, Abraham Burgett, lived in Pickaway County and there married Eliza Wells, a native of Ohio. He and his wife continued to live in that County, and there Isaac W. Burgett was born. The family shortly afterward removed to Indiana and settled in Vermillion County, near Perrysville, on the Wabash River. Here Abraham Burgett followed the occupations of cooper and farmer. He died in 1840, leaving five children. Isaac W. Burgett was born June 18, 1829. When the family removed to Douglas County they settled near the mouth of Brushy Fork. He went to school in the Sargent neighborhood and in the vicinity of Newman. On coming to Douglas County his mother rented land, and when a mere boy he had charge of the farm and with a younger brother performed nearly all the labor. This continued until his mother’s second marriage. In the summer he worked at home and in the winter went to school. When about eighteen years of age he started out...

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Biography of Judge John Brown

Judge John Brown has been for over sixty years identified with the best interests of Douglas County. He was born in Ross County, Ohio, May 7, 1822, on a farm, where he remained until the age of seventeen. This farm was located on Paint creek, two miles from Chillicothe, the County seat of Ross County. Our subject is a son of Nimrod Brown, who was a native of Augusta County, Virginia, and who served in the war of 1812. His mother was, before her marriage, Elizabeth Eigelbright, and was born in Monroe County, Virginia. When our subject was but seven years old his father died, and his mother, with three sons and four daughters, emigrated to what is now Douglas County, in about 1838, and settled in what is now Sargent Township. The Judge’s paternal grandfather, Washington Brown, was a Virginian by birth. At the time his mother located in Sargent Township she was very poor, the oldest son, Washington, managing the business. Land at that time sold for from four to six dollars an acre, but money was very scarce. This was in September, 1838, the date of his mother’s settlement in Sargent Township. Judge Brown married in 1844, Sally Ann Barnett, who was a daughter of William and Mary Barnett, natives of Kentucky and early settlers in Vermilion County. Mrs. Brown died in 1853, leaving one child,...

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Biographical Sketch of George W. Brock

George W. Brock, one of the reliable and representative farmers of Newman Township, residing within the corporate limits of the city of Newman, was born twelve miles southwest of Crawfordsville, Indiana, September S, 1846. His father, Seth Brock, was a native of Warren County, Ohio. He was a carpenter by trade and farmed also, owning farms in Wayne and Montgomery counties: he later removed to Mason County, Illinois. He was a strong pro-slavery man, and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church; was born in 1813 and died in 1873. He wedded Mary A. Palmer, who was a daughter of Jesse Palmer, a native of North Carolina, but who be-came one of the early settlers of Indiana. Elijah Brock (grandfather) was born in Ohio. George W. Brock was reared on a farm and educated in the common schools. At the age of sixteen years, on account of a severe spell of sickness, he lost the use of his right side. He married at Camp Butler, Miss Malinda Vanhook, daughter of Thomas and Matilda (Mann) Vanhook, and the result of this union was one child living, Ada Lucy, aged fifteen years, and three dead : Phillip L., Harry C. and Ethel Ellen. Mrs. Brock, who was a most estimable woman, died February 16, 1899. She was a devoted member of the Christian Church at Newman and her loss was deeply...

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Biographical Sketch of Walter C. Blaine

Walter C. Blaine was graduated from the University of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia, in the class of 189$. He commenced the practice at Murdock, where he remained until October, 1898, when he formed a partnership with Dr. William E. Rice, of Tuscola. Dr. Blaine is a native of Champaign, Illinois, and was born June 1 866. He graduated from the Champaign high school, and after four years attendance was graduated from the University of Illinois, at Champaign, on certificate. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias, member of the Woodmen, and a member of the Douglas County Medical...

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Biography of Robert M. Black

Robert M. Black, the subject of this memoir, came from an ancestry of more than ordinary importance and prominence. His great-grandfather, with his family, removed from Scotland and settled in Virginia some years before the Revolutionary war, caused by the traitor Arnold in portions of Virginia, volunteered, though far past the age of liability, for military service, and was one of the soldiers, who, under Lafayette and Gen. Wayne, turned and drove back Lord Cornwallis. He was intimately acquainted with Lafayette, Gen. Wayne and Gen. Lord Sterling, who were frequent guests at his house. His youngest son, George Black, the grandfather of our subject, was born on the 8th of July, 1767. He was nine years old when the Declaration of Independence was issued. He was a son of the Revolution and saw and caught the spirit of most of the stirring scenes of that eventful period. George Black, with his family, re-moved from Virginia and settled in Kentucky, some time before the war of 1812. He became a soldier of this war in a regiment of mounted rifleman and rendered important service under the command of Gen. Harrison. With such an ancestry, whose character and qualities he reproduced and reflected, together passed through the terrors and excitement with his own individual traits, we may under stand the life of Robert M. Black, who was the ninth in a...

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Biography of Joseph Ashurst

Joseph Ashurst, principal and superintendent of the Camargo public schools and present nominee of the Democratic Party for the office of County superintendent of schools, has been a leading educator in the County for several years. He was born in Somerset, Pulaski County, Kentucky, April 16, 1872, and is a son of Henry Clay and Elizabeth (Thurman) Ashurst, who were both horn in Pulaski County, Kentucky. His grandfathers, Henry Ashurst and Joseph Thurman, were natives of Virginia and early settlers in Pulaski County, where they were engaged in agricultural pursuits. His father, Henry C. Ashurst, was one time sheriff of his native County. Joseph Ashurst attended the common school and afterward the high school, and is largely self educated. In Douglas County he stands at the very front rank as a successful educator and teaches in his schools at Camargo, beside the common branches, botany, philosophy, zoology and algebra. Prior to his coining to Camargo, which was in September, 1899, he resided at Arthur, where lie located in 1890 and taught school in the country and subsequently was grammar teacher in the Arthur schools, which position he resigned to accept his present one. In 1894 he was united in marriage to Miss Lucy B., a daughter of Henry C. Wood, a retired farmer, of Arthur, but formerly of Moultrie County. Mr. Wood was born near Vincennes, Indiana, in 1845,...

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History of Douglas County Illinois

This collection on the History of Douglas County Illinois currently contains 114 biographies on important people in the history of the county. The open prairie country of Douglas county greatly retarded the settlement of this section of Coles county. A few came here previous to 1850, but the great bulk of the public lands was occupied by actual owners subsequent to that date. The original pioneer of Douglas county was John Richman, who, in 1829, settled in Camargo township.

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Biographical Sketch of William E. Atwell

William E. Atwell was born in Bracken County, Kentucky, in the year A. D. 1831, and there grew to man’s estate, when he moved to a farm in Pendleton County in the same state. He wedded Miss Nancy Barrett, of near Cynthiana. She died in June, 1897. They had twelve children, all of whom are living and doing well in the world. Mr. Atwell is a son of William and Ursla (Fields) Atwell, who were natives of old Virginia. His grandfathers were Hugh Atwell and Leban Fields, the former born in Virginia and the latter in North Carolina.. Mr. Atwell, who is a warm hearted gentleman, for which his state is noted, has for several years made his home with one of his daughters, Mrs. Elizabeth M. Wyeth, in her beautiful country seat in Garrett...

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Biography of Thomas W. Roberts

Thomas W. Roberts, the bright young lawyer of Tuscola, attorney for the I. D. & W. R. R. Co. and city attorney, has from the humble walks of life pressed his way to the front and today stands among the leading and most successful lawyers at the bar. Thomas W. Roberts was born in Owens-burg, Green County, Indiana, May 1, 1866, and soon thereafter came with his parents to Douglas County, and located at Camargo, where young Robert attended school until sixteen years of age. In 1882 his father removed to Tuscola, and there the young man learned the tinner’s trade. But that was only a means to an end, and in 1886 he was appointed to a clerk-ship in the treasury department at Washington, where he worked day time and attended school at night, and for four years continued in the preparatory department of Georgetown University, after which he took a four-years’ course in the law department of the same institution and was graduated in 1892. Mr. Roberts was at once admitted to the bar of Illinois, and entered upon his chosen profession, becoming the partner of the late C. W. Woolverton (see sketch), with whom he continued until the death of his associate in 1895, since which time Mr. Roberts has continued in the practice alone. He is attorney for the I. D. & W. R. R....

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Biographical Sketch of Charles A. Hawkins

Charles A. Hawkins, the present gentlemanly County clerk, was born in Pickaway County, Ohio, May 25, 186o, and is a son of William and Sarah (Hard) Hawkins, natives of the same state. His father died in 1866. Mr. Hawkins was principally educated at, Danville, Indiana, and spent two and a half years teaching. He served his Township (Newman) as tax collector and supervisor, and in November, 1898, was elected County clerk. On October 7, 1884, Mr. Hawkins married Louisa J. Curtis, of Newman, and they have four children: Claude A., Opal B., Pearl L. and Jay M.. Our subject is a Mason and a Knight of Pythias and is active in Republican...

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Biographical Sketch of Washington D. Boyce

Washington David Boyce was born at the foot of Blue Ridge near Leesburg, Lee County, Virginia, in the year A. D. 1802 and died in Camargo Township in February, 1882. He was among the first settlers in that Township, where he entered forty acres of land. He established the first blacksmith shop at the village of...

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Biography of William H. Fisher

William H. Fisher, a retired farmer and an ex-soldier of the Civil war, came to Douglas County in 1877 and located on a farm two and a half miles southeast of Arcola, which he purchased and resided on for four years, when he removed to Albany, Oregon. In 1882 he returned to Douglas County and located on a farm in Tuscola Township, remaining here for two years. He then purchased a farm east of Galton, which he owned and re-sided upon for ten years, when, in 1893, he moved to Tuscola, where he at present resides. He owns one hundred and sixty acres of land, northwest of town. Our subject was born in Ohio County, Indiana, January 7, 1839, and was a son of Andrew and Eliza (Hunter) Fisher, the former a native of Butler County, Ohio, and the latter of Switzerland County, Indiana. His paternal grandfather, Jacob Fisher, was a Pennsylvanian by birth. His maternal grand-father, John Hunter, was born in Ireland, and subsequently emigrated to Switzerland County, Indiana, and then to Ohio County, Indiana. Mr. Fisher’s paternal great-grandfather was a Revolutionary soldier, and several other members of the Fisher family were in the Indian and other early wars. William H. Fisher was reared in Jefferson County, Indiana, on a farm, and in August, 1862, he volunteered in the Eighty-third Indiana Infantry and served until the close of...

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Biography of Alexander McNeill

Alexander McNeill, farmer, was a son of Alexander and Nancy (Montgomery) Mc-Neill, and was born in Ireland March 10, 1808. The first twenty-six years of his life he spent in his native land. In 1834 he emigrated to America, landing in Philadelphia. Thence, two months later, went to Paris, Bourbon County, Kentucky, where, upon letters of introduction from his uncles in the old country, he obtained a situation as clerk in a cotton establishment. After a year he accepted a position as clerk in a dry goods store at Owensville, Bath County, Kentucky, where he remained six years, then sold goods on his own account in the same town, having been saving and diligent during his seven years’ clerkship, which enabled him to engage in business for himself. Owing to ill health, after about four years in mercantile pursuits, he bought a large farm in Bath County, Kentucky, and began farming, which has been his principal pursuit since. It is proper to here note the causes which induced his removal from Kentucky to Illinois. Soon after coming to America he became a Whig, then a Republican and the breaking out of the Civil war found him a Union man: Bath County, his home, was the constant scene of guerrilla war-fare, and men like Mr. McNeill lived in a state of constant jeopardy. In 1863 his home was invaded by...

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