Collection: Indian Treaties Acts and Agreements

Treaty of August 30, 1819

A treaty made and concluded by Benjamin Parke, a commissioner on the part of the United States of America, of the one part, and the Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the tribe of Kickapoos of the Vermilion, of the other part. Article I. The Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the said tribe, agree to cede, and hereby relinquish, to the United States, all the lands which the said tribe has heretofore possessed, or which they may rightfully claim, on the Wabash river, or any of its waters. Article II. And to the end that the United States may be enabled to fix with the other Indian tribes a boundary between their respective claims, the Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the said tribe, do hereby declare, that their rightful claim is as follows, viz: beginning at the northwest corner of the Vincennes tract; thence, westward, by the boundary established by treaty with the Piankeshaws, on the thirtieth day of December, eighteen hundred and five, to the dividing ridge between the waters of the Embarras and the Little Wabash; thence, by the said ridge, to the source of the Vermilion river; thence, by the same ridge, to the head of Pine creek; thence, by the said creek, to the Wabash river; thence, by the said river, to the mouth of the Vermilion river, and thence by the Vermilion,...

Read More

Treaty of September 2, 1815

A treaty of peace and friendship, made and concluded between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part; and the undersigned Chiefs, Warriors, and Deputies, of the Kickapoo Tribe or Nation, on the part and behalf of the said Tribe or Nation, of the other part. The parties being desirous of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe or nation, and of being placed in all things, and in every respect, on the same footing upon which they stood before the war, have agreed to the following articles: Article 1. Every injury or act of hostility by one or either of the contracting parties towards the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot. Article 2. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America, and all the individuals composing the said Kickapoo tribe or nation. Article 3. The contracting parties do hereby agree, promise, and oblige themselves, reciprocally, to deliver up all the prisoners now in their hands (by what means so ever the same may have come into their possession) to the officer commanding at Fort Clarke, on the Illinois river, to be by him restored to their respective nations as soon as it may...

Read More

Indian Treaties Makah to Muscogee

Treaties for all tribes listed below. Names in (parentheses) are other names used for tribe. The tribes included in the treaties on this page are: Makah, Mandan, Me-Sek-Wi-Guilse, Menominee, Miami, Middle Oregon Tribes, Minitaree, Mitchigamia, Modoc, Mohawk, Molala, Munsee, and Muscogee Tribes. Makah Treaties (Makah) Treaty of July 20, 1815 Treaty of October 6, 1825 Treaty of January 31, 1855 Mandan Treaties Treaty of July 30, 1825 Treaty of September 17, 1851 Agreement of July 17, 1866 Me-Sek-Wi-Guilse Treaties Treaty of January 22, 1855 Menominee Treaties (Menominie, Menomonie, Menomonee) Treaty of March 30, 1817 Treaty of August 19, 1825 Treaty of August 11, 1827 Treaty of February 8, 1831 Supplemental Treaty of February 17, 1831 Treaty of October 27, 1832 Treaty of September 3, 1836 Treaty of October 18, 1848 Treaty of May 12, 1854 Miami Treaties (Miame, Meamie) Treaty of August 3, 1795 Treaty of June 7, 1803 Treaty of August 21, 1805 Treaty of September 30, 1809 Treaty of July 22, 1814 Treaty of September 8, 1815 Treaty of October 6, 1818 Treaty of October 23, 1826 Treaty of February 11, 1828 Treaty of October 23, 1834 Treaty of November 6, 1838 Treaty of November 28, 1840 Treaty of June 5, 1854 Treaty of February 23, 1867 Middle Oregon Tribe Treaties Treaty of June 25, 1855 Treaty of November 15, 1865 Minitaree or Belantse-Etoa Treaties (Belantse-Etea, Belantse-Eta,...

Read More

Treaty of November 28, 1840

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at the Forks of the Wabash, in the State of Indiana, this twenty-eighth day of November in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty, between Samuel Milroy and Allen Hamilton, acting (unofficially) as commissioners on the part of the United States, and the chiefs, warriors and headmen of the Miami tribe of Indians. Article I. The Miami tribe of Indians, do hereby cede to the United States all that tract of land on the south side of the Wabash river, not heretofore ceded, and commonly known as “the residue of the Big Reserve.” Being all of their remaining lands in Indiana. Article II. For and in consideration of the cession aforesaid, the United States agree to pay to the Miami tribe of Indians the sum of five hundred and fifty thousand dollars. Three hundred thousand dollars of which sum to be set apart, and applied immediately after the ratification of this treaty and an appropriation is made by Congress to carry its provisions into effect, to the payment of the debts of the tribe, as hereinafter stipulated. And the residue, two hundred and fifty thousand dollars, to be paid in twenty equal yearly installments. Article III. The Miamies, being desirous that their just debts shall be fully paid; it is hereby, at their request stipulated, that immediately on...

Read More

Treaty of February 11, 1828

The Eel river or Thorntown party of Miami Indians cede to the U.S. all claim to a reservation of land about 10 miles square at their village on Sugar Tree creek in Indiana, reserved to them by article 2, of the treaty of Oct. 6, 1818.

Read More

Treaty of October 18, 1848

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at Lake Pow-aw-hay-kon-nay, in the State of Wisconsin, on the eighteenth day of October, one thousand eight hundred and forty-eight, between the United States of America, by William Medill, a commissioner duly appointed for that purpose, and the Menomonee tribe of Indians, by the chiefs, headmen, and warriors of said tribe. Article I. It is stipulated and solemnly agreed that the peace and friendship now so happily subsisting between the Government and people of the United States and the Menomonee Indians shall be perpetual. Article II. The said Menomonee tribe of Indians agree to cede, and do hereby cede, sell, and relinquish to the United States all their lands in the State of Wisconsin, wherever situated. Article III. In consideration of the foregoing cession, the United States agree to give, and do hereby give, to said Indians for a home, to be held as Indians’ lands are held, all that country or tract of land ceded to the said United States by the Chippewa Indians of the Mississippi and Lake Superior, in the treaty of August 2, 1847, and the Pillager band of Chippewa Indians, in the treaty of August 21, 1847, which may not be assigned to be assigned to the Winnebago Indians, under the treaty with that tribe of October 13, 1846, and which is guarantied to contain not less...

Read More

Treaty of March 30, 1817

A treaty of peace and friendship made and concluded at St. Louis by and between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and Auguste Chouteau, commissioners on the part and behalf of the United States of America, of the one part, and the undersigned chiefs and warriors, deputed by the Menomenee tribe or nation of Indians, on the part and behalf of their said tribe or nation, of the other part. The parties, being desirous of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe or nation, and of being placed in all things, and in every respect, on the same footing upon which they stood before the late war, have agreed to the following articles: Article I. Every injury, or act of hostility, by one or either of the contracting parties, against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot. Article II. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States and all the individuals composing the said Menomenee tribe or nation. Article III. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, on the part and behalf of their said tribe or nation, do, by these presents, confirm to the United States all and every cession of land heretofore made by their tribe or nation to the British, French, or Spanish, government, within the limits of the United States, or their territories; and also, all...

Read More

Treaty of July 20, 1815

A treaty of peace and friendship, made and concluded between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part; and the Chiefs and Warriors of the Mahas, on the part and behalf of said Tribe or Nation, of the other part. The parties desirous of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe or nation, and of being placed in all things, and in every respect, on the same footing upon which they stood before the late war between the United States and Great Britain, have agreed to the following articles: Article 1. Every injury or act of hostility committed by one or either of the contracting parties against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot. Article 2. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America and all the individuals composing the tribe or nation of the Mahas, and all friendly relations that existed between them before the war, shall be, and the same are hereby, renewed. Article 3. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and their said tribe or nation, do hereby acknowledge themselves and their tribe or nation to be under the protection of the United States, and of no other nation, power,...

Read More

Treaty of November 17, 1876

To The Honorable The Minister Of The Interior. Sir, –I recommended in my dispatch of the 7th June, that measures should be adopted to secure the adhesion of the Indians, who had not been met with when Treaty Number Five was concluded, and was requested by you to entrust the duty to Mr. Graham, of the Indian Department here, or to the Hon. Thomas Howard, Mr. Graham was unable to leave the office. I therefore entrusted the matter to Mr. Howard and J. Lestock Reid, D.L.S. I gave these gentleman written instructions, a copy of which will be found appended to the report of Mr. Howard, in which I directed them to meet the Island Indians and those of Berens River together, and then to separate, Mr. Reid proceeding to Norway House and Mr. Howard to the Grand Rapids of the Saskatchewan and the Pas, this course being necessary to enable the work to be accomplished during the season. I have pleasure in informing you that these gentlemen discharged their mission most successfully and satisfactorily, as will be seen from the following reports, which I enclose, viz: A. Joint report of Messrs. Howard and Reid as to the Island Indians of Lake Winnipeg and those of Berens River. B. Report of Mr. Howard as to the band at the Grand Rapids, and as to his negotiations with the Indians...

Read More

Treaty of July 14, 1876

To The Hon. Thos. Howard And J. Lestock Reid, Esq. Dear sirs, –Under authority from the Minister of the Interior, I have to request you to proceed to Lake Winnipeg for the purpose of–on behalf of the Privy Council of Canada–securing the adhesion to Treaty Number Five of the Indians who have not yet been dealt with, and to make the necessary payments to the others. 1st. You will, if possible, together proceed to or meet at the following places, being there on the days named, viz.: Dog Head Point, 25th July, and Berens River on the 5th August. 2nd. Mr. Howard will then proceed to the mouth of the Saskatchewan, so as to reach there on the 25th of August, and then arrive at the Pas on the 5th of September. 3rd. Mr. Reid will proceed from Berens River to Norway House, to arrive there on or before the 25th of August. 4th. You or either of you will secure the adhesion of the Island Indians to the treaty after the form annexed, and will request them to select a Chief and three Councilors, and will be authorized to promise them a reserve of one hundred and sixty acres to each family of five, or that proportion for larger or smaller families, to be selected for them by the person chosen for that end by the Privy Council...

Read More

Burke Act

The Burke Act is an act to amend section six of an act approved February eighth, eighteen hundred and eighty-seven (Burke Act), statutes at large 34, 182-83.

Read More

Treaty of November 15 1827

Articles of agreement made and concluded at the Creek Agency, on the fifteenth day of November, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-seven, between Thomas L. McKenney, and John Crowell, in behalf of the United States, of the one part, and Little Prince and others, Chiefs and Head Men of the Creek Nation, of the other part. WHEREAS a Treaty of Cession was concluded at Washington City in the District of Columbia, by JAMES BARBOUR, Secretary of War, of the one part, and OPOTHLEOHOLO, JOHN STIDHAM, and OTHERS, of the other part, and which Treaty bears date the twenty-fourth day of January, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-six (Treaty of January 24, 1826); and whereas, the object of said Treaty being to embrace a cession by the Creek Nation, of all the lands owned by them within the chartered limits of Georgia, and it having been the opinion of the parties, at the time when said Treaty was concluded, that all, or nearly all, of said lands were embraced in said cession, and by the lines as defined in the said Treaty, and the supplemental article thereto: and whereas it having been since ascertained that the said lines in said Treaty, and the supplement thereto, do not embrace all the lands owned by the Creek Nation within the chartered limits of Georgia, and the President of the United States having...

Read More

Treaty of January 24, 1826

Articles of a treaty made at the City of Washington, this twenty-fourth day of January, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-six, between James Barbour, Secretary of War, thereto specialty authorized by the President of the United States, and the undersigned, Chiefs and Head Men of the Creek Nation of Indians, who have received full power from the said Nation to conclude and arrange all the matters herein provided for. WHEREAS a treaty was concluded at the Indian Springs, on the twelfth day of February last, between Commissioners on the part of the United States, and a portion of the Creek Nation, by which an extensive district of country was ceded to the United States. And whereas a great majority of the Chiefs and Warriors of the said Nation have protested against the execution of the said Treaty, and have represented that the same was signed on their part by persons having no sufficient authority to form treaties, or to make cessions, and that the stipulations in the said Treaty are, therefore, wholly void. And whereas the United States are unwilling that difficulties should exist in the said Nation, which may eventually lead to an intestine war, and are still more unwilling that any cession of land should be made to them, unless with the fair understanding and full assent of the Tribe making such cession, and for a just...

Read More

Treaty of February 12, 1825

Articles of a convention, entered into and concluded at the Indian Springs, between Duncan G. Campbell, and James Meriwether, Commissioners on the part of the United States of America, duly authorised, and the Chiefs of the Creek Nation, in Council assembled. WHEREAS the said Commissioners, on the part of the United States, have represented to the said Creek Nation that it is the policy and earnest wish of the General Government, that the several Indian tribes within the limits of any of the states of the Union should remove to territory to be designated on the west side of the Mississippi river, as well for the better protection and security of said tribes, and their improvement in civilization, as for the purpose of enabling the United States, in this instance, to comply with the compact entered into with the State of Georgia, on the twenty-fourth day of April, in the year one thousand eight hundred and two: And the said Commissioners having laid the late Message of the President of the United States, upon this subject, before a General Council of said Creek Nation, to the end that their removal might be effected upon terms advantageous to both parties: And whereas the Chiefs of the Creek Towns have assented to the reasonableness of said proposition, and expressed a willingness to emigrate beyond the Mississippi, those of Tokaubatchee excepted: These...

Read More

Search

Subscribe to AccessGenealogy

Enter your email address to subscribe to AccessGenealogy and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 4,428 other subscribers

It takes a Village to grow a Family Tree!


It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Recent Comments

Subscribe to AccessGenealogy

Enter your email address to subscribe to AccessGenealogy and receive notifications of new posts and databases by email.

Join 4,428 other subscribers

Pin It on Pinterest