Select Page

Collection: Illustrated History of the State of Idaho

The Alturas Senator Mining Company

The mines of Alturas Senator Mining Company are situated at Galena, Blaine County, Idaho, comprising ten claims, the most promising of which are the Senate and Gladwater. At one time these mines were yielding well, but, because of the decline in silver, operations were discontinued and the smelter dismantled. Some development is contemplated in this year, 1899. The company is composed of wealthy men in New York. Lewis Edwards, the president, and Dr. Barron, the president of the Carpenter Steel Works of New York, are the principal factors. The Ashland Group Mining Company have four silver-lead claims at Muldoon and two silver-lead claims on Boyle mountain. Nothing has been done with these claims for the past twelve years. The Cansada-Ledlie Company own two claims, the Cansada and the Ledlie, on Trail creek about six miles from Ketchum. George Yount, of Ketchum, and a Philadelphia party are conducting some development work on the Cansada under the management of Knox...

Read More

The Ontario Group Of Mines

The Ontario Group Of Mines, which are now owned by Michael Carey, state senator, are located on Warm Spring creek, twelve miles west of Ketchum, in Blaine county, Idaho. They yield galena ore silver and lead and the veins extend east and west, dipping toward the south, and average from three to three and a half feet in width. The ore has an average yield of forty per cent, lead, eighty ounces of silver and three dollars in gold to the ton. These mines are worked by tunnels, which thus afford drainage and permit the ore to be run out on tracks. They were first discovered by John Boyle in 1880, were purchased by the Warm Springs Consolidated Company, and, as stated, are now the property of Senator Carey. The group consists of the following mines: Ontario, Hub No. 2, Niagara, Hathaway, Sunday, Gopher, Kalemet Fraction, Log Cabin, Michigan Fraction and the North Star. Half a million of dollars have been taken from the Ontario. The Star has been a good producer, also the Sunday, and the others have not as yet been worked so extensively. There is a good concentrating mill, costing twenty thousand dollars, on the property, and quite a number of tunnels have been made, the longest being three hundred feet. All the mines in this vicinity produce rich ore, and there is no doubt but...

Read More

The Poorman Mine

On War Eagle Mountain, a mile and a half southeast of Silver City, are a group of about twenty mines, in one of the richest belts in that section of the state, a belt which has afforded material to render Silver City famous throughout the civilized world. The Poorman mine has a production record of three million dollars, and other properties of the group as Bell Pick, Oso, Illinois Central, Jackson and Silver Cord have all been good producers. The Poorman mine was discovered in 1865, and between July 9 and October 1, 1866, there was shipped from it the enormous sum of $606,692. The ore consists of chloride, sulphide of silver and a considerable proportion of copper. At a depth of one hundred feet five hundred pounds of ruby silver were taken out in one solid piece. This piece of ore was awarded a gold medal at the Paris Exposition of 1867. The Poorman mine is said to have been the richest body of ore for its size ever discovered. The mine is equipped with a ten-stamp mill, erected in 1895, and for the transportation of ore from the mine to the mill there is a wire-cable tramway of the Hallidie system one mile long. In 1888 the property was purchased by a syndicate of London, England, which is incorporated as the Poorman Gold Mines, limited. John B....

Read More

The Red Cloud Group Of Mines

The Red Cloud Group Of Mines is situated on Deer creek, a tributary of Wood river, about twelve miles in a northwesterly direction from the town of Hailey, in Mineral Hill mining district, Blaine county, and is owned by Lyttleton Price, of Hailey, and Pittsburg parties. These mines were discovered by Orin Porter, E. H. Porter and James L. Mason, in 1880. The present owners purchased them in 1889, organized what was known as the Red Cloud Mining Company, and worked these properties for several years, paying in dividends ten thousand dollars per month, approximating in the total two hundred thousand dollars. In 1897 large quantities of water were struck and a deep tunnel was run on the property for the purpose of draining the mines and exploring them at greater depth. About this time the company put in a water-power plant, air-compressor, and also every other mechanical adjunct necessary to modern mining; but, after they had ex-tended their deep tunnel to a distance of six thou-sand feet and made connection with the upper workings, five hundred and sixty feet higher, they found that the country was broken and faulted and that, together with the very low price of silver and lead then prevailing, discouraged the owners and they accordingly discontinued operations, although the mine was considered by experts to be one of the most valuable in the state. The...

Read More

The Philadelphia & Idaho Mining & Smelting Company

The Philadelphia & Idaho Mining & Smelting Company was organized in 1882 by Colonel Green and Philadelphia parties, who built two stock plants and a large smelter plant at Muldoon, Blaine county, this state, and operated them for several years, in Muldoon. The ores in the vicinity of Ketchum, Idaho, were of a higher grade, and were attracting more attention than those they were then mining, and certain Philadelphia gentlemen had become interested in them, and they induced the Philadelphia Mining & Smelting Company to come to Ketchum. A small test was made with a little tester, and in the course of less than a week a profit of ten thousand dollars was made! They then joined with the other Philadelphia people and organized the Philadelphia & Idaho Company. The Philadelphia Company that had first begun the work had acquired the North Star mine, the West Fork group, the Ervin and the Ten Brook on Boyle mountains, the Silver Star, Salamander, New York Boy and the Muldoon. The buildings at the North Star and Silver Star mines were, on the reorganization, remodeled and enlarged; power was obtained from two water wheels. The flume, coming out from Warm Springs creek about two miles above the smelter and just below the geyser hot springs, was easily kept open during the coldest weather, which was an exceptional advantage, and enabled the company to...

Read More

The Hecla Group

The Hecla mine is located at Burke, Shoshone County (Lalande mining district). The original claims comprising the Hecla group were the Hecla and Katie May lode claims, located by James Toner on May 5, 1885. The property was purchased by the Hecla Mining Company, a corporation of Idaho, the principal stockholders being A. B. Campbell, John A. Finch, Patrick Clark, Simon Haley and a party of Milwaukee gentlemen. Up to January 1 , 1898, the Hecla shipped thirteen thousand dollars’ worth of lead-silver ore while the development work was progressing. This ore was taken out partly by the company and partly by leasers. During the spring and summer of 1898 the Hecla Mining Company of Washington was organized, with a capital of two hundred and fifty thousand dollars, one million shares of the par value of twenty-five cents each, the officers being: A. B. Campbell, president; John A. Finch, vice-president; and H. R. Allen, secretary and treasurer The new company purchased the Hecla and Katie May claims from the old Hecla company, and also purchased the Or-No-Go fraction lode from James Doherty, M. Maher and John Stack. A bond was taken on the Orphan Boy, Orphan Girl, Leadville, Denver, Climax and Sylvanite, from John H. Van Dorn, which was subsequently taken up by the company. Later on the company purchased the Muscatine and Burlington claims from J. H. Van...

Read More

The Standard Group Of Mineral Claims

The Standard group of claims consists of the following patented lode claims: Standard, Banner, Snow Line, Sancho, Sandwich, Youngstown, Sullivan Fraction, Banner Fraction, Parallel, Little Chap, Mammoth Fraction, a portion of the Mammoth, and Tariff, also the Columbia, Crown Point and Tom Reed, all located in the Coeur d’Alene silver-lead mineral belt, Lalande mining district, Shoshone county, Idaho, one mile from Burke, also the Union Mill-site located at Wallace, Idaho, together with water rights and flumes from which is developed about three hundred horse-power. The Standard claim was located May 7, 1885, by Timothy McCarthy, Timothy Hynes. Frank Hanson and John H. Simmons. All the claims in the Standard group are patented, the patents having issued direct to the Standard Mining Company, with the exception of the Mammoth, Tariff and Mammoth Fraction. These claims are patented, but the patent issued direct to the original owners and was afterward transferred to the Standard Mining Company. The Standard Mining Company is a corporation of Idaho. Its capital stock is five hundred thousand dollars, divided into five hundred thousand shares of the par value of one dollar each. The officers of the company are as follows: Amasa B. Campbell, president; John A. Finch, vice-president and treasurer; W. E. Finch, secretary. The stock is held principally by the Finch & Campbell Syndicate of Youngstown, Ohio, Chicago and Milwaukee. The property was purchased by...

Read More

The Lead Belt Of The Coeur d’Alenes

Lead was first discovered in the Coeur d’Alene mining district, in northern Idaho, on Canyon creek in the fall of 1884, the discovery at that time being the Tiger mine, situated at the town of Burke. During same year a few other locations were made on Canyon creek, a few at Mullan, and in the fall of 1885 the Bunker Hill & Sullivan mines were discovered at Wardner. At the time these discoveries were made the country was inaccessible, with no railroads, wagon roads or trails, and the only way of getting in was by foot; ten to fifteen miles’ travel per day was about all the distance a prospector could cover, owing to the heavy underbrush and timber at that time. The prospector of that day who has not kept posted with the progress of the Coeur d’Alenes would hardly be able to recognize the country at this time. The camp at present may be divided into four districts, viz.: Canyon Creek, Wardner, Mullan and Nine Mile, and standing in the importance of output in the order named. The veins in the Canyon creek district are true fissure veins and as such are likely to go to great depth, some of them having already reached a depth of one thousand feet to one thousand two hundred feet, with no signs of any decrease in quality or quantity of...

Read More

The Coeur d’Alene Mining District

This article, as well as that following, concerning the lead belt of the district, is contributed by F. R. Culbertson, under date of July 9. 1898: The Coeur d’Alene mineral belt of northern Idaho, in area about twenty miles square, first came into prominence as a gold-placer camp in the summer and fall of 1883. Placer gold was first discovered on Pritchard creek, near Eagle City, now a deserted camp in Shoshone County. Fabulous reports of the richness and extent of this gold soon spread and attracted the attention of the outside world. In the spring of 1884 there was quite a stampede into the Coeur d’Alene district, being somewhat similar to the present excitement over Klondike. Prospectors for the Coeur d’Alenes from the west outfitted at Spokane and proceeded thence by rail to Rathdrum, by stage to Coeur d’Alene city and from this point on by the old Mullan road (built by the government as a military road) to Evolution, about twenty miles above the Mission; and from this point on by trail to Eagle City. Prospectors from the east left the main line of the Northern Pacific at Herron and Trout Creek and continued from there by trail into the mines. The stories told by the old prospectors of the difficulties of get-ting into the country over these trails remind one of the description and accounts of...

Read More

The Mining Fields Of Idaho

The following excellent monograph by W. C. Austin was issued in pamphlet form early in the present year (1899) by authority of C. J. Bassett, state commissioner of immigration, labor and statistics, and as a valuable contribution to the history of the great mining industry of Idaho is held to be worthy of reproduction in this work: There is no other country on God’s green earth that has encompassed within her borders such vast and varied mineral wealth as Idaho. The position that Idaho occupies in the western mineral world is like a wagon wheel, of which Idaho is the hub, while her great mineral belts, radiating out from her mountain fastnesses, penetrating her sister states and enriching them, represent the spokes. Place yourself before a map and trace out several of these great mineral belts. Beginning in the southern part of California, the belt runs through Eldorado, Mariposa and Calaveras counties, thence to Bodie across into Nevada in a northeasterly course, giving birth to the great Comstock lode and other camps, through by Winnemucca, and in Idaho makes its grand entry at Silver City and De Lamar, in Owyhee county; thence on in through Rocky Bar and Atlanta, Custer and Bonanza; thence on to central Idaho, at Gibbonsville. Here the opposite spoke to the great mineral wheel comes in and penetrates the Rocky mountains on into Montana, where...

Read More

Labor Troubles In The Coeur d’Alene District

The following account of the recent labor troubles in the Coeur d’Alene mining district is contributed by H. H. Smith, of the Cincinnati Post, who, as a reporter of the Scripps-McRae League, was present on the scene and made careful investigation of the matter: The blowing up of the Bunker Hill and Sullivan mill at Wardner on April 29, 1899. entailing a financial loss of two hundred and fifty thousand dollars and the murder of two men was the culminating act of violence in the ten-years war between labor and capital that has waged in the Coeur d’Alenes. In...

Read More

Biography of Thomas C. Galloway

Thomas C. Galloway. The first settler of Weiser was the gentleman whose name introduces this article. Before the town was founded he located on land that is now within its borders, and since that period has been actively identified with the growth and development of the little hamlet which has become one of the flourishing cities of Idaho. His residence in the state covers a period of thirty-six years, and as time has passed he has risen to a position among the most successful stock-dealers and business men of the commonwealth. His landed and other possessions are now very extensive, and he is thereby enabled to live a retired life “crowning a youth of labor with an age of ease.” Mr. Galloway was born at Mineral Point, Iowa county, Wisconsin, on the 6th of June, 1837, and is of Scotch descent. His grandfather, Charles Galloway, was a native of the land of hills and heather, whence he emigrated to America, locating in Richmond, Virginia. When the British empire began to encroach on the liberties of the colonists he joined the Americans in their opposition to such measures, and fought throughout the greater part of the war for independence. He was at Yorktown and witnessed the surrender of Lord Cornwallis to General Washington. His son, Charles Galloway, was born in Virginia, in 1798, and wedded Miss Mary Haney, who was...

Read More

Biography of Benjamin and Hosea Eastman

Tales of heroism have been the theme of song and story throughout all ages. He who has gone forth to battle for his country, his home or his principles, has figured in history, in literature and in music, and his bravery has stirred the souls of men through all times. All honor to such an one, and yet his heroism is no greater or his daring more pronounced than that of the honored pioneers of the west. Men reared in comfortable homes, accustomed to all the conveniences and privileges of life in the east, have come into the wild western districts and braved danger and hardships untold. Cut off from all comforts and luxuries, they have also had to face death at the hand of the treacherous Indian, and in little bands and oft times singly they have had to fight for liberty and life. Volumes have been written, yet the story of the pioneers has never been adequately told. They deserve all praise and honor and the mighty states of the west with their splendid improvements, enterprises and tokens of civilization are monuments to their memory. The Eastman Brothers, Benjamin Manson and Hosea Bradford, are among those who have founded the state of Idaho and brought about her present prosperity and greatness. They are now numbered among the leading business men of Boise, where many important business interests...

Read More

Biography of William F. Kettenbach

William F. Kettenbach now deceased, was one of Lewiston’s most enterprising and successful businessmen, and for many years was president of the Lewiston National Bank. He left the impress of his individuality upon the commercial life and prosperity of the city, and his history forms an important chapter in the annals of the growth and development of this section of the state. He was born in New York City, May 15, 1849, just two days after the arrival of his parents, Henry and Elizabeth Kettenbach, from Germany. They were natives of that land. The father was descended from one of the noble families of Germany, and held the office of colonel of cavalry at Wurtzburg. On coming to America he took his family to Indianapolis, Indiana, and there the subject of this review was educated. When sixteen years of age he left school and proceeded to the frontier, where he was in the government service, acting as a scout with Kit Carson and Buffalo Bill. After the civil war he for some years acted as guide to emigrant trains across the plains, and then returned to Indianapolis, where he was engaged in the wholesale and retail grocery business for three years. He then devoted his energies to conducting a hardware store, and in the meantime invested largely in real estate, but in the financial panic of 1877 all his...

Read More

Biography of James W. Ballantine

One of the foremost representatives of the mercantile interests of the Wood river valley is James W. Ballantine, of Bellevue. A native of Pennsylvania, he was born February 15, 1839, and in his life has manifested many of the sterling traits of his Scotch ancestry, who emigrated to the United States in 1825. His parents were Nathaniel and Sarah (Wallace) Ballantine, natives of Scotland, in which country they were reared and married. Crossing the Atlantic to America, they took up their residence near Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, where the father engaged in merchandising. They were Presbyterians in their religious faith, and were people of the highest integrity of character, respected by all who knew them. For more than forty years Nathaniel Ballantine was a successful business man of Pennsylvania, and lived to be seventy-eight years of age, while his wife passed away at the age of seventy. They had eight children, four of whom are living. James W. Ballantine is the eldest living of their sons. He was educated in the public schools of his native state, and received his business training at the store and under the direction of his father, whom he assisted in the conduct of a mercantile establishment until President Lincoln issued his first call for volunteers to aid in suppressing the rebellion in the south. Mr. Ballantine at once responded, enlisting in April 1861, and assisted...

Read More

Search


It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest