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Collection: Indian Treaties Acts and Agreements

Indian Treaties Bannock to Brothertown

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Treaties for the Bannock, Belantse, Blackfeet, Blood, and Brothertown Tribes. Names in (parentheses) are other names used for tribe. Bannock Treaty of July 3, 1868 Belantse-Etoa Treaties (Belantse-Etea, Belantse-Eta, Minnetaree) Treaty of July 30, 1825 Blackfeet (Blackfoot, Blackfoot Nation) Treaty of October 17, 1855 Treaty of October 19, 1865 Blood Treaty of October 17, 1855 Brothertown Treaty of January 15,...

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Indian Treaties Dakota to Eel River

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Treaties for all tribes listed below. Names in (parentheses) are other names used for tribe: Dakota, Des Chutes, Delaware, Dwamish, and Eel River Tribes Dakota (Sioux) Treaty of September 17, 1851 Treaty of October 19, 1865 Des Chutes Treaty of June 25, 1855 Treaty of November 15, 1865 Delaware Treaties (Deleware) Treaty of September 17, 1778 Treaty of January 21, 1785 Treaty of January 9, 1789 Treaty of August 3, 1795 Treaty of June 7, 1803 Treaty of August 18, 1804 Treaty of July 4, 1805 Treaty of August 21, 1805 Treaty of September 30, 1809 Treaty of July 22, 1814 Treaty of September 8, 1815 Treaty of September 29, 1817 Treaty of September 17, 1818 Treaty of October 3, 1818 Treaty of August 3, 1829 Treaty of October 26, 1832 Agreement of December 14, 1843 Treaty of May 6, 1854 Treaty of May 30, 1860 Treaty of July 2, 1861 Treaty of July 4, 1866 Dwamish Treaty of January 22, 1855 Eel River Treaties Treaty of August 3, 1795 Treaty of June 7, 1803 Treaty of August 7, 1803 Treaty of August 21, 1805 Treaty of September 30, 1809 Treaty of February 11,...

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Treaty of July 4, 1866

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of agreement between the United States and the chiefs and councilors of the Delaware Indians, on behalf of said tribe, made at the Delaware Agency, Kansas, on the fourth day of July, eighteen hundred and sixty-six. Whereas Congress has by law made it the duty of the President of the United States to provide by treaty for the removal of the Indian tribes from the State of Kansas; and whereas the Delaware Indians have expressed a wish to remove from their present reservation in said State to the Indian country, located between the States of Kansas and Texas; and whereas the United States have, by treaties negotiated with the Choctaws and Chickasaws, with the Creeks, and with the Seminoles, Indian tribes residing in said Indian country, acquired the right to locate other Indian tribes within the limits of the same; and whereas the Missouri River Railroad Company, a corporation existing in the State of Kansas by the laws thereof, and which company has built a railroad connecting with the Pacific Railroad, from near the mouth of the Kaw River to Leavenworth, in aid of which road the Delawares, by treaty in eighteen hundred and sixty-four, agreed to dispose of their lands, has expressed a desire to purchase the present Delaware Indian reservation in the said...

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Treaty of May 30, 1860

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of agreement and convention made and concluded at Sarcoxieville, on the Delaware Reservation, this thirtieth day of May, one thousand eight hundred and sixty, by Thomas B. Sykes, as a commissioner on the part of the United States, and following named chiefs of the Delaware tribe of Indians, viz: John Conner, head chief of the whole tribe; Sar-cox-ie, chief of the Turtle band; Ne-con-he-con, chief of the Wolf band; Rock-a-to-wha, chief of the Turkey band, and assistants to the said head chief, chosen and appointed by the people, and James Conner, chosen by the said chief as delegate. Article 1. By the first article of the treaty made and concluded at the city of Washington, on the sixth day of May, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-four, between George W. Manypenny, commissioner on the part of the United States, and certain delegates of the Delaware tribe of Indians, which treaty was ratified by the Senate of the United States on the eleventh day of July, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-four, there was reserved, as a permanent home for the said tribe, that part of their country lying east and south of a line beginning at a point on the line between the Delawares and Half-breed Kansas, forty miles in a direct line west of...

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Treaty of May 6, 1854

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of agreement and convention made and concluded at the city of Washington this sixth day of May, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-four, by George W. Manypenny, as commissioner on the part of the United States, and the following-named delegates of the Delaware tribe of Indians, viz: Sarcoxey; Ne-con-he-cond; Kock-ka-to-wha; Qua-cor-now-ha, or James Segondyne; Ne-sha-pa-na-cumin, or Charles Journeycake; Que-sha-to-wha, or John Ketchem; Pondoxy, or George Bullet; Kock-kock-quas, or James Ketchem; Ah-lah-a-chick, or James Conner, they being thereto duly authorized by said tribe. Article 1. The Delaware tribe of Indians hereby cede, relinquish, and quit-claim to the United States all their right, title, and interest in and to their country lying west of the State of Missouri, and situate in the fork of the Missouri and Kansas Rivers, which is described in the article supplementary to the treaty of October third, one thousand eight hundred and eighteen, concluded, in part, on the twenty-fourth September, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-nine, at Council Camp, on James’ Fork of White River, in the State of Missouri; and finally concluded at Council Camp, in the fork of the Kansas and Missouri Rivers, on the nineteenth October, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-nine; and also their right, title, and interest in and to the “outlet” mentioned and described in said...

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Treaty of August 3, 1829

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of agreement made between John M’Elvain, thereto specially authorized by the President of the United States, and the band of Delaware Indians, upon the Sandusky River, in the State of Ohio, for the cession of a certain reservation of land in the said State. Article I. The said band of Delaware Indians cede to the United States the tract of three miles square, adjoining the Wyandot Reservation upon the Sandusky River, reserved for their use by the treaty of the Rapids of the Maumee, concluded between the United States and the Wyandots, Seneca, Delaware, Shawnees, Potawatamies, Ottawas, and Chippiwa tribes of Indians, on the twenty-ninth day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventeen, and the said tribe of Delawares engage to remove to and join their nation on the west side of the Mississippi, on the land allotted to them, on or before the first day of January next, at which time peaceable possession of said reservation is to be given to the United States. Article II.In consideration of the stipulations aforesaid, it is agreed, that the United States shall pay to the said band the sum of three thousand dollars: two thousand dollars in hand, the receipt of which is hereby acknowledged by the undersigned Chiefs of...

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Treaty of September 17, 1778

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of agreement and confederation, made and entered into by Andrew and Thomas Lewis, Esquires, Commissioners for, and in Behalf of the United States of North-America of the one Part, and Capt. White Eyes, Capt. John Kill Buck, Junior, and Capt. Pipe, Deputies and Chief Men of the Delaware Nation of the other Part. Article 1. That all offences or acts of hostilities by one, or either of the contracting parties against the other, be mutually forgiven, and buried in the depth of oblivion, never more to be had in remembrance. Article 2. That a perpetual peace and friendship shall from henceforth take place, and subsist between the contracting parties aforesaid, through all succeeding generations: and if either of the parties are engaged in a just and necessary war with any other nation or nations, that then each shall assist the other in due proportion to their abilities, till their enemies are brought to reasonable terms of accommodation: and that if either of them shall discover any hostile designs forming against the other, they shall give the earliest notice thereof, that timeous measures may be taken to prevent their ill effect. Article 3. And whereas the United States are engaged in a just and necessary war, in defence and support of life, liberty and independence, against...

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Treaty of October 3, 1818

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of a treaty made and concluded at St. Mary’s, in the state of Ohio, between Jonathan Jennings, Lewis Cass, and Benjamin Parke, commissioners of the United States, and the Delaware nation of Indians. Article I. The Delaware nation of Indians cede to the United States all their claim to land in the state of Indiana. Article II. In consideration of the aforesaid cession, the United States agree to provide for the Delawares a country to reside in, upon the west side of the Mississippi, and to guaranty to them the peaceable possession of the same. Article III. The United States also agree to pay the Delawares the full value of their improvements in the country hereby ceded: which valuation shall be made by persons to be appointed for that purpose by the President of the United States; and to furnish the Delawares with one hundred and twenty horses, not to exceed in value forty dollars each, and a sufficient number of perogues, to aid in transporting them to the west side of the Mississippi; and a quantity of provisions, proportioned to their numbers, and the extent of their journey. Article IV. The Delawares shall be allowed the use and occupation of their improvements, for the term of three years from the date of this treaty...

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Indian Treaties Five Nations to Foxes

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Treaties for all tribes listed below. Five Nations Indians, Flathead Tribe, Florida Indians, and Fox Tribe. Five Nations Treaties Agreement of April 24, 1792 Flathead Treaties Treaty of October 17, 1855 Treaty of July 16, 1855 Florida Indian Treaties Treaty of September 18, 1823 Fox Treaties (Sac and Fox, Foxe, Foxes) Treaty of November 3, 1804 Treaty of September 14, 1815 Treaty of September 3, 1822 Treaty of August 4, 1824 Treaty of September 28, 1836 Second Treaty of September 28, 1836 Treaty of October 21, 1837 Second Treaty of October 21, 1837 Treaty of October 11, 1842 Treaty of March 6, 1861 Treaty of February 18,...

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Treaty of September 14, 1815

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A treaty of peace and friendship, made and concluded at Portage des Sioux between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part; and the undersigned King, Chiefs, and Warriors, of the Fox Tribe or Nation, on the part and behalf of the said Tribe or nation, of the other part. The parties being desirous of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe or nation, and of being placed in all things, and in every respect, on the same footing upon which they stood before the war, have agreed to the following articles: Article 1. Every injury or act of hostility by one or either of the contracting parties against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot. Article 2. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between the citizens of the United States of America and all the individuals composing the said Fox tribe or nation. Article 3. The contracting parties do hereby agree, promise, and oblige themselves, reciprocally, to deliver up all the prisoners now in their hands, (by what means so ever the same may have come into their possession,) to the officer commanding at Fort Clark, on the...

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Indian Treaties Gros Ventres to Iowa

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Treaties for all tribes listed below. Names in (parentheses) are other names used for tribe: Gros Ventres, Illinois, and Iowa Tribes. Gros Ventres (Grosventres) Treaty of September 17, 1851 Treaty of October 17, 1855 Agreement of July 27, 1866 Illinois Treaty of September 25, 1818 Treaty of October 27, 1832 Iowa Treaties (Iaway, Ioway) Treaty of September 16, 1815 Treaty of August 4, 1824 Treaty of August 19, 1825 Treaty of July 15, 1830 Treaty of September 17, 1836 Treaty of November 23, 1837 Treaty of October 19, 1838 Treaty of May 17, 1854 Treaty of March 6,...

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Treaty of September 16, 1815

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A treaty of peace and friendship, made and concluded at Portage des Sioux, between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part; and the undersigned, King, Chiefs, and Warriors, of the Iaway [Iowa] Tribe or Nation, on the part and behalf of the said Tribe or Nation, of the other part. The parties being desirous of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe or nation, and of being placed in all things, and in every respect, on the same footing upon which they stood before the war, have agreed to the following articles: Article I. Every injury, or act of hostility, by one or either of the contracting parties against the other shall be mutually forgiven and forgot. Article II. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States and all the individuals composing the said Iaway tribe or nation. Article III. The contracting parties do hereby agree, promise, and oblige themselves, reciprocally to deliver up all the prisoners now in their hands, (by what means so ever the same may have come into their possession,) to the officer commanding at St. Louis, to be...

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Indian Treaties Kalapuya to Lepan

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Treaties for all tribes listed below. Names in (parentheses) are other names used for tribe. Tribes included on this page are the Kalapuya, Kansa, Kaskaskia, Ka-Ta-Ka, Keechy, Kickapoo, Kik-Ial-Lus, Kiowa, Klamath, Kootenay, Lepan, Long-Wha, and Lummi Tribes. Kalapuya Treaties (Calapooia) Treaty of January 22, 1855 Treaty of November 29, 1854 Kansa Treaties (Kanza, Kansas, Kanzas) Treaty of October 28, 1815 Treaty of June 3, 1825 Treaty of August 16, 1825 Treaty of January 14, 1846 Treaty of October 5, 1859 Treaty of March 13, 1862 Kaskaskia Treaties Treaty of August 3, 1795 Treaty of June 7, 1803 Treaty of August 13, 1803 Treaty of August 7, 1803 Treaty of September 25, 1818 Treaty of October 27, 1832 Treaty of May 30, 1854 Treaty of February 23, 1867 Ka-Ta-Ka Treaties Treaty of May 26, 1837 Keechy Treaties (Keeche) Treaty of May 15, 1846 Kickapoo Treaties (Kikapo) Treaty of August 3, 1795 Treaty of August 7, 1803 Treaty of December 9, 1809 Treaty of September 2, 1815 Treaty of June 4, 1816 Treaty of August 30, 1819 Treaty of July 19, 1820 Treaty of September 5, 1820 Treaty of October 24, 1832 Treaty of May 18, 1854 Treaty of June 28, 1862 Kik-Ial-Lus Treaties Treaty of January 22, 1855 Kiowa Treaties (Kioway) Treaty of May 26, 1837 Treaty...

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Treaty of September 5, 1820

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of a convention made and concluded, between Benjamin Parke, a Commissioner on the part of the United States, for that purpose, of the one part, and the Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the Tribe of Kickapoos of the Vermilion, of the other part. Article I. It is agreed, that the annuity secured to the said Tribe, by the Treaty of the thirtieth of August, eighteen hundred and nineteen, shall hereafter be paid to the said Tribe at Kaskaskias, in the state of Illinois. Article II. As the said Tribe are now about leaving their settlements on the Wabash, and have desired some assistance to enable them to remove, the said Benjamin Parke, on behalf of the United States, has paid and advanced to the said Tribe, two thousand dollars, the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged; which said sum of two thousand dollars, is to be considered as an equivalent, in full, for the annuity due the said Tribe, by virtue of the aforesaid Treaty, for the year eighteen hundred and twenty-one. In testimony whereof, the said Benjamin Parke, commissioner as aforesaid, and the chiefs, warriors, and head men, of the said tribe, have hereunto set their hands, at Vincennes, the fifth day of September, eighteen hundred and twenty. B. Parke Wagohaw, his x mark...

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Treaty of July 19, 1820

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A treaty made and concluded by, and between, Auguste Chouteau and Benjamin Stephenson, Commissioners of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part, and the undersigned Chiefs and Warriors, of the Kickapoo tribe of Indians, on the part and behalf of their said Nation, of the other part, the same being supplementary to, and amendatory of, the Treaty made and concluded at Edwardsville, on the 30th July, 1819, between the United States and the said Kickapoo nation. Article I. It is agreed, between the United States and the Kickapoo tribe of Indians, that the sixth article of the treaty, to which this is supplementary, shall be, and the same is hereby, altered and amended, so as to read as follows, viz: In consideration of, and exchange for, the cession made by the aforesaid tribe, in the first article of this treaty, the United States, in addition to three thousand dollars worth of merchandise, this day paid to the said tribe, hereby cede to the said tribe, to be by them possessed in like manner as the lands, ceded by the first article of this treaty by them to the United States, were possessed, a certain tract of land in the territory of Missouri, and included within...

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