Select Page

Location: Yorkshire England

Descendants of Mark Lothrop of Bridgewater MA

The Lothrop family, of which the late Frederick Lothrop Ames was a descendant on his mother’s side, is an old family of Massachusetts. The name Lowthrop, Lothrop or Lathrop is derived from Lowthrope, a small parish in the wapentake of Dickering, East Riding of Yorkshire, England, four and a half miles northeast from Great Driffield, and a perpetual curacy in the archdeaconry of York. The church there was an ancient institution, said to have been built about the time of Edward III., although there has been no institution to it since 1579.

Read More

Biography of William Morfitt

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now To this worthy veteran of many a struggle with the savages on the frontier, as well as in many of the battles of life in the wild country, being a pioneer of the state of Oregon, and having led a life of activity in the forefront of the progress of civilization, having done well his part in all this good work, we are pleased to grant a consideration in this volume of Malheur County’s history, both because of this prominent part that he has taken in the County and in its leading industries and developments, as well as for his worth as a man and citizen. Mr. Morfitt was born in Yorkshire, England, on April 17, 1838, being the son of James and Susana Morfitt. In 1842 the father brought his family to the United States, landing in New York and thence to the site of Chicago, where he located the first foundry of that now famous city. In 1847 he came with his family across the plains to Oregon. Enroute they were attacked by the Indians several times once on the Rogue River, where four savages were killed but no loss of life among the immigrants. Before that, in the Modoc Country, they lost half of their cattle by the red-skins. At the mouth of...

Read More

Biography of Franklin S. Bramwell

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now FRANKLIN S. BRAMWELL. – To the esteemed gentleman, whose life’s career it is now our privilege to give in brief review, we grant a representation in these chronicles of our county, since he is at the head of one of large industries of the county, and also because of the prominent place that he holds in the manipulation of the affairs of the strong church of the Latter Day Saints in this section. He is assistant manager of the Oregon Sugar Company of Lagrande, but is far more widely known as bishop of his church and lately in the more prominent office of president of the missions of the northwest. His jurisdiction extends over a diocese that is very large nad includes Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana, the Dakotas and the northwest country of the British possesions as far east as Winnipeg. Mr. Bramwell was born in Yorkshire, England, whence came so many of our most intelligent and thrifty citizens. Eighteen hundred and sixty was the date, his parents being George W. and Mary (Stevenson) Bramwell. They came to Ogden, Utah, in 1870, the father being a music and school teacher. He labored faithfully at these callings until two years since, when he was called hence and his remains are buried at Rexburg, Idaho. The mother is...

Read More

Biography of Edmund Buckley

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The pioneer in the woolen industry in Idaho is Edmund Buckley, an enterprising and progressive business, man who is now carrying on operations in the line of woolen manufactures near the town of Franklin. A native of Yorkshire, England, he was born April 25, 1839, of English parentage, and was educated in the land of his birth, where he remained until 1863, when he sailed for America, Utah being his destination. In 1856 he had been converted to the faith of the Latter Day Saints, and taking passage on the Atlantic, a sailing vessel, he arrived at New York after a voyage of seven weeks. In England he had married Miss Alice Green, and he brought with him his wife and their first child. They crossed the plains with ox teams to Utah, and while en route a young lady in their party was killed by lightning, near Fort Laramie. After reaching the end of their journey Mr. Buckley conducted a carding mill, making rolls in the old way. The following season he came to the Cache valley, settling at High creek, where he made rolls for W. D. Hendricks. Subsequently he went to Brigham City, where he operated the woolen factory for a few years and then went to Logan to establish a factory there,...

Read More

Biography of James Hutchinson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Many theories have been advanced as to the best method of winning success, but the only safe, sure way to gain it is by close application, perseverance and careful consideration of the business problems that are continually arising. Investigation will show that the majority of men who have started out in life with little or no capital and have won a competency if not wealth, have to attribute their prosperity to just such causes, and it is those elements which have made Mr. Hutchinson one of the leading business men of his state. He is now superintendent of the Trade Dollar Consolidated Mining Company, at Silver City, and is numbered among the representative residents of that place. A native of Yorkshire, England, he was born November 17, 1837, his parents being Joseph and Eleanor (Spencley) Hutchinson, both of whom were natives of the same county, where their ancestors had lived for many generations. The father was a miner and shepherd, and with his wife and eight children he crossed the Atlantic and took up his residence in Iowa. The voyage was made in 1848, on a sailing vessel, which dropped anchor in the harbor of New York nine weeks after leaving the European port. Locating in Dubuque, Iowa, the mother there died in 1851, at the...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Fred Baldwin

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Baldwin, Fred; born, Yorkshire, England, Feb. 11, 1882; son of Robert and Martha Baldwin; educated in England; married, Columbus, O., Aug. 1910, Margaret May Talbot; resident of Cleveland for 5...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of John Bottoms

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now John Bottoms was born in Yorkshire, England, in 1812, and came to America in 1840; he landed at New Orleans, and from there went to Nauvoo, Illinois, where he was a member of the Mormon Church. He remained there until 1845, when he went to Cincinnati and worked in a bucket factory for about three years. In 1848 he went to Council Bluffs and remained there until 1852. He then went to Salt Lake City and remained there until 1858, when he came to California. During this time he had had prolonged trouble with the Mormons and concluded to stand their arbitrary treatment no longer: hence he crossed the plains to California. He worked in Los Angeles County for a while and then came to San Bernardino County, where he purchased a ranch, on which he has resided ever since. He was married in Cincinnati, in 1847, to Miss Althea Ugle, a native of that city, of German descent. Mr. Bottoms is one of the first settlers in this valley, has been an honest and upright citizen, and is respected by all who know...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of William Stubbs

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now George S. Stubbs, member of one of the largest lumber firms in the state of New York, is an energetic and enterprising man of business, ready to adopt all progressive methods and improvements which have proved their practicability. He is of English descent. (I) William Stubbs, the first of this family to come to America, was born in Yorkshire, England, 1798, and died in New York state, 1858. He emigrated to this country in 1824, settled at first in Oneida county, New York, then migrated to Ontario county in the same state, and there made farming his life work. He married in England, 1824, Elizabeth King, born in Yorkshire, England, 1801, died in this country,...

Read More

Biography of John Harris

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now John Harris, immigrant ancestor, was of Scotch-Irish descent, it is said, but was born in Yorkshire, England. He came to this country as early as 1682 and engaged in trade with the Indians at the suggestion of his friend, Edward Shippen. In January, 1705, he received a license from the colonial government allowing him to locate on the Susquehanna river and erect such buildings as are necessary for his trade and to enclose such quantities of land as he shall think fit. During one of his expeditions as a licensed Indian trader he beheld the beauties and advantages of Paxtang. It was the best fording place on the Susquehanna river. As the land had not been purchased from the Indians at that time neither John Harris or others could locate on the tract lying between Conewago and Lechay hills and Kittatinny mountains, except as in his capacity as licensed trade or by the simple process of “Squatter Sovereignty.” About 1718 a band of drunken Indians set out to burn John Harris at the stake and at last accounts the tree to which he was bound was still standing. He providentially escaped and at his own request was buried at the foot of this tree in Harris Park in 1748. The grave is opposite the Simon Cameron...

Read More

Biography of Benjamin Brown

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now BENJAMIN BROWN. – Mr. Brown was born in Yorkshire, England, in 1831, and remained at his native place until 1857, receiving a common-school education. In this year he emigrated to American and settled in Michigan, remaining until March, 1858, when he came to California by way of New York and the Isthmus. From San Francisco he found his way to the Siskiyou mines, and operated until July of 1868, and thence came to the Frazer river mines. In the autumn of that year, he brought his journeyings to a close at Steilacoom, where he remained a year. Being favorably impressed with the Pacific coast country, he now returned East for his family, bringing them to the agency on the Umatilla reservation, where he was employed until the next spring. After a time spent in freighting to Walla Walla, he removed to the Grande Ronde valley, and helped in the building of a stockade some six miles north of the present site of La Grande. He has remained in the vale ever since, and has been closely identified with the history of the country. In 1852 he was married to Miss Francis Kirk; and a family of five girls are growing up around him. The only trouble they had with the Indians was in 1862, the time...

Read More

Biography of Francis Fletcher

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now FRANCIS FLETCHER. – Mr. Fletcher was among the very earliest of the settlers of Oregon, being here two years before the establishment of the Provisional government, and has consequently seen the great development of this state and coast form its earliest inception; and he has himself been one of the most active to induce the progress of the last fifty years. He was born in Yorkshire, England, March 1, 1814, and, at the age of fourteen years, crossed the water to Ontario, Canada, and afterwards to Peoria, Illinois. In 1839, in company with Amos Cook and others, he started for Oregon. An interesting bit of his life’s history is the chapter dating from the spring in which he left Peoria. It was then and there he heard Reverend Jason Lee, who had been to Oregon, lecture upon the then almost unknown Pacific Northwest; and he was fired with a resolve to come to the land of the setting sun. A company of sixteen men was formed, of whom our subject was the most conspicuous. They started early in May and went to Independence, Missouri, where they exchanged their wagons for pack animals, and after one week’s delay went forward upon their trip across the mountains, deserts and plains to Oregon. After traveling about one hundred and...

Read More

Biography of John S. Rhodes

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now John S. Rhodes. Thousands of people who possess only a passing knowledge of Topeka, including the whereabouts of the State House and a few other important institutions, have a very definite acquaintance with a certain store on Kansas Avenue, the proprietor of which is John S. Rhodes. Mr. Rhodes has been a resident of Topeka for thirty-six years. It is in no wise detrimental to his dignity to say that he has a “junk” shop. One visiting his establishment is reminded of the “old curiosity shop” of Dickens. His shop contains literally thousands of dollars worth of goods consisting of anything from a sewing needle to a gas engine. It is by no means an ordinary second-hand store. His customers are among the wealthiest people of the country, who go to him or write to him for anything rich and rare that may attract their fancy. Beautiful and costly bric-a-brac, books, works of art and works of practical usefulness, can be found in the Rhodes shop when they might not otherwise be found short of the biggest cities of the country. Mr. Rhodes has lived in the capital city of Kansas since April, 1880. He is what is termed a “down easter,” having been reared in New England. However, he is a foreigner by birth, and...

Read More

Biography of Joseph K. Gill

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Joseph K. Gill, one of Portland’s well known business men, was born in Yorkshire, England, in 1841, and is the eldest of eleven children of Mark and Amelia Gill. In 1854 he accompanied his parents to America, locating in Worcester, Massachusetts, where he attended the city schools until he had reached the age of eighteen, when he entered Worcester Academy, continuing at this institution but spending most of his time at work to assist in the support of the family, until he had attained his majority. He then entered Wesleyan Academy at Wilbraham, a preparatory school, with the idea of fitting himself for a collegiate course. While pursuing his studies, however, his eyes failed him, and he was forced for a time to abandon his plan. At Wilbraham he boarded with the wife of Dr. W. H. Wilson, one of the earlier missionaries in Oregon. From her, and also from J. S. Smith and Joseph Holman, of Oregon, whom he met at her home, he learned much of our then young State, which fact added to his having been advised by his physician that a sea voyage might be beneficial to his eyes, led him in 1864, to come to Oregon by steamer. He located at Salem, where he continued his studies at the Willamette University,...

Read More

Search


It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest