Location: Yavapai County AZ

Biography of George E. Wells

GEORGE E. WELLS. – The subject of this sketch is a man of great energy and power of adaptability, as is manifested in the occupations that have been engaged in by him during the years in which he has been in this western country, and it is pleasant to remark that during all of these varied undertakings, some of which have been exceedingly arduous and fraught with hardship and danger, he has manifested a stanch and unflinching courage, marked industry and enterprise, with excellent personal qualities of integrity and upright principles, while a good success has attended his efforts, both became of the excellent practical judgment used and because of his keen foresight and untiring efforts to do well whatever his hand undertook. Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY INTL Start Now George E. was born in Licking county, Ohio, on November 3, 1850, being the son of John and Sarah (Holmes) Wells. The father came to Oregon in 1859, settling at Oregon City and following the milling business...

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Biographical Sketch of Atlantic A. Moore

Atlantic A. Moore, during the twenty-four years that he resided in Kansas, assisted in the founding of Marion County and became a familiar and respected figure in both houses of the State Legislature. He was familiarly known as “Lank” Moore. A native of Ohio, he came to Wankegan, Illinois, as a boy, living there and in Wisconsin until he “entered the government service” with his brother, as a driver of ambulances from Kansas City to Santa Fe. Not caring to settle in that part of the Southwest, they started on their return in the fall of the same year. At Cottonwood Crossing (now Durham, Kansas) on the Santa Fe trail, a man named Smith had built a small log cabin and was running a trading post, selling whisky, canned goods and other provisions to passing trains. The Moore brothers bought out the place, and later took up a claim at what became known as Moore’s Ranch. In the spring of 1861 a postoffice was established there, with A. A. Moore as postmaster. That year the Town of Marion Center was also laid out, and there Mr. Moore built a store and otherwiso identified himself with the growth of the place. Upon the organization of Marion County in 1865 he was elected county treasuror and representative; was returned to the Legislature in 1867; served in the State Senate in 1868,...

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Apache Indians

Apache Indians. Located in southern New Mexico and Arizona, western Texas, and southeastern Colorado, also ranging over much of northern Mexico. Together with the Navaho, the Apache constituted the western group of the southern division of the Athapascan linguistic stock.

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Biographical Sketch of T. B. Johns

T. B. Johns, farmer, P. O. Athens, was born in Galena, Ill., April 8, 1841. In 186l he went to California, and back to Nevada in 1862; thence to Utah; thence to Idaho; thence to British Columbia; thence to Oregon; thence to Montana; thence to Wyoming; thence back to Utah; thence to Prescott, Arizona, back to Nevada, and again back to Illinois; thence to Queenstown, Ireland, and back to the United States, settling at Abilene, Kan., in 1871. Came to Jewell County in October 1871, and is now the owner of 240 acres of land. Mr. Johns has been an extensive traveler, but becoming tired of traveling has for the past eleven years lived in Jewell County, and has found the soil of Kansas productive. Has held the office of Township Trustee. Was married in February, 1872, in Jewell County, to Miss Claire Farren; they have four children – Thomas C., Richard S., Carrie, and...

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Buckley, Doris – Obituary

Enterprise, Oregon Doris Buckley died at a care home in Phoenix, Ariz. on Jan. 25, 2007. She was 75. Mrs. Buckley was born in La Grande on Sept. 18, 1931, to Albert and Anna Gake. She lived in La Grande for a few years until the family moved to Enterprise and then to Joseph, where she attended school. During the war, the family moved to Huntington where her father worked for the Union Pacific Railroad. She graduated from Huntington High School. She married Glen Buckley in 1949. They worked on ranches in Wallowa County for a number of years, and then moved to California. In the early sixties, they moved to Black Canyon, Ariz., due to health reasons. During that time they made many trips to Wallowa County to visit family. Mr. Buckley died in 1987. Mrs. Buckley continued to live in Black Canyon until her health forced her to move to a care center. She continued to visit Wallowa County until her health prevented her from doing so. She and her husband both loved the mountains and enjoyed hunting and fishing. Mrs. Buckley is survived by her sister Virginia Lampkins of La Grande, niece Linda Noble of Baker City and nephew Larry Lampkins of Haines, Alaska. A memorial service will be held at Bowman Funeral Home in Enterprise on Feb. 10 at 11 a.m. Wallowa County Chieftain –...

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Mandeville, Helen Clara – Obituary

La Grande, Oregon Helen Clara Mandeville, 94, of La Grande, died Aug. 16 at a local care center. A full obituary will be available later. Loveland Funeral Chapel and Crematory is in charge of arrangements. The Observer – August 20, 2008 ________________________________________ Helen Clara Mandeville, 94, of La Grande, died Aug. 16 at a local care center. Loveland Funeral Chapel and Crematory is in charge of arrangements. Helen was born May 22, 1914, to Oscar and Minnie (Pohl) Dahms in Blue Hill, Neb. She was raised and educated in Blue Hill, and moved to California in the mid-1930s. She lived in Black Canyon City, Ariz., before moving to La Grande in 1996. She enjoyed rock collecting, organizing garage sales and sewing. She is survived by her son, Kenneth and his wife, Sue Mandeville, of Cove; two grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. The Observer – August 26,...

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Yavapai County, Arizona Census Records

Yavapai County was one of the original four counties which comprised Arizona in 1864. 1870 Yavapai County, Arizona Census Free 1870 Census Form for your Research Hosted at USGenWeb Census Project Arizona 1870 Federal Census Index A B C-D E-F G-I J-L M N-Q R S T-Z Yavapai County 1870 Federal Census pg 82-90 pg 91-96 pg 97-104 pg 104-111 pg 112-114 Hosted at Sharlot Hall Museum’s Website Search the 1870 Census Index Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1870 Yavapai County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1870 U.S. Census Guide 1880 Yavapai County, Arizona Census Free 1880 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Sharlot Hall Museum’s Website Search the 1880 Census Index Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1880 Yavapai County, Census Index 1880 Yavapai County, Census Images $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1880 U.S. Census Guide 1890 Yavapai County, Arizona Census Free 1890 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1890 Veterans Schedule $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1890 U.S. Census Guide 1900 Yavapai County, Arizona Census Free 1900 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Sharlot Hall Museum’s Website Search the 1900 Census Index Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1900 Yavapai County, Census (images and index) $...

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Yavapai County, Arizona Cemetery Records

Most of these cemetery listings are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Following Cemeteries (hosted at Yavapai County, Arizona Tombstone Transcription Project ) Ashfork Cemetery Black Canyon Memorial Cemetery Bradshaw City Cemetery Clear Creek Cemetery Columbia Cemetery Congress Cemetery Congress Pioneer Cemetery Cordes Cemetery Crown King Cemetery Genung Memorial Park Cemetery Las Vegas Ranch Cemetery McCabe Cemetery Santa Maria Pioneer Cemetery Skull Valley Cemetery Stanton & Weaver/Octave Cemeteries Tip Top Cemetery Tussock Spring Cemetery Valley View Cemetery Woodmen of the World Prescott National Cemetery  (hosted at Interment) Hosted at the Arizona Gravestone Project. Arizona Pioneer Cemetery Ash Fork Cemetery Boblett Cemetery Casner Cemetery Centerville Cemetery Cemetery Cherry Cemetery Chino Valley Cemetery Citizens Cemetery Clear Creek Cemetery Congress Cemetery Congress Pioneer Cemetery Cooks Cemetery Cottonwood Cemetery Cottonwood / Aztecia Cemetery Dead Horse State Park Cemetery Cemetery Ferguson – Morrell Cemetery Genung Cemetery Guttry Gravesite Cemetery Heritage Memorial Park Cemetery Hoagland Burial Site Cemetery Humboldt Cemetery I.O.O.F. Cemetery Jerome / Hogback Cemetery Jerome Valley / Lower Jerome Cemetery Lower Jerome Cemetery Masonic Cemetery Mayer Cemetery McCabe Cemetery Middle Verde Cemetery Mountain View Cemetery Peeples Valley Cemetery Perkinsville Cemetery Prescott National Cemetery Prescott National Cemetery Cemetery Private Land Cemetery Red Rock/Schuerman Cemetery Redwood Memorial Gardens Cemetery Rolling Hills Cemetery Simmons Cemetery Skull Valley Cemetery Valley View...

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Shafer, Margaret B. Bunch Mrs. – Obituary

Margaret B. Shafer, 90, of Prescott, Ariz., formerly of Baker City, died on Monday, June 23, 2003, peacefully at her home in Prescott. Memorial service will be held at 1 p.m., Tuesday, July 1, 2003, at the American Evangelical Lutheran Church, 1085 Scott Drive, Prescott, AZ 86301. Flowers may be sent or donation made to the church in Marge’s name. She was born January 19, 1913 in Baker City, to R.B. and Gertrude Bunch Her husband, Emmett Shafer, passed away April 16, 1984. Marge is survived by numerous nieces and nephews in Arizona, Colorado, Oregon, Washington and Idaho. Marge has been a resident of Prescott since the early 1960s. She was manager of The Flower Box for many years. She was a member of the American Evangelical Lutheran Church. Used with permission from: The Record Courier, Baker City, Oregon, July, 2003 Transcribed by: Belva...

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Biography of J. W. Swilling

J. W. Swilling, known as “Jack Swilling,” was born in the state of Georgia in 1831. He emigrated to Missouri in early life, and there settled down. After having resided in that state some four years, his wife died, leaving one child, a girl, who afterwards married and lived in Missouri. About the year 1857, Swilling emigrated to Texas where he remained for two years, when he came to Arizona, and was in the employ of the Overland Mail Company for quite a length of time. During the Rebellion, Swilling was a lieutenant in Captain Hunter’s company of volunteers in Baylor’s regiment, and occupied himself with thirty of his men, in protecting settlers and others from the Indians along the Rio Grande in Southern New Mexico, and along the road to Tucson, Arizona. When the Confederates were driven out of New Mexico, Mr. Swilling remained in Arizona, and a few months afterwards, was carrying the express for the soldiers and acting as guide for them through the countrv. The following winter, he joined the Walker Party. He was one of the party that accompanied Colonel Jack Sniveley, a veteran of the Texas War of Independence, and General Houston’s private secretary, in a prospecting trip when the mines of Pinos Altos were discovered, and Swilling, it is said, was at the head of the party that discovered Rich Hill, near...

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Biographical Sketch of A. F. Banta

A. F. Banta was born in Indiana in 1846, and came to the Territory in 1863. He was one of the chief Government guides and scouts, with headquarters at Fort Whipple, from 1865 to 1871. He was a member of the 10th Legislature, and introduced and passed a bill organizing the county of Apache, of which he became District Attorney, holding the office two terms, 1879-80 and 1889-90. He was Probate Judge of the same county in 1881-82; a member of the Legislature in 1883-84; Justice of the Peace at St. John in 1876; at Springerville in 1877-78, and County Assessor in 1880. He was the chief guide of the Wheeler Exploration Expedition, and also the 100th Meridian Expedition in 1873. He served as United States Marshal and Deputy Sheriff in the 80’s. He was the first postmaster at Springerville during President Hayes’ administration. At various times he has been an editor. His last adventure of this kind was editing the “Observer” at St. Johns, Apache County. His personal adventures would fill a volume. In the enjoyment of all his faculties, and in perfect health for one of his age, he is still scouring the country and prospecting. The writer saw him a few weeks ago when he was organizing an expedition to find what is known as the “Lost Dutchman...

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Biography of Pauline Weaver

Probably, the first white settler, if, indeed, a trapper at that time could be called a settler, was Pauline Weaver, a native of White County, Tennessee. Of his early history there is little known. His name is inscribed upon the walls of the Casa Grande with the date, 1833. He is credited with having explored the Verde, and also the Colorado River numerous times. There was hardly a foot of the Territory of Arizona he was not conversant with. Differing entirely from the majority of the trappers of that day, he had no difficulties with the Indians, but was always free to enter their camps. He had the confidence of the Pimas, the Maricopas, the Yumas, the Wallapais, the Mohaves and the different tribes along the Colorado, speaking their languages fluently. He was never known to engage in any hostile expedition against them, but was frequently a peace messenger, arranging, as far as possible, any difficulties between the whites and the Indians, without resorting to arms. He discovered the placers along the Gila, and also the placers at Weaver Diggings near Antelope Creek in the southern part of Yavapai County, a full account of which is given in one of the succeeding chapters of this volume. Weaver located a ranch in Yavapai County, where he lived for many years, and died at Camp Verde in the late 60’s and...

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Biographical Sketch of John T. Alsap

John T. Alsap came to Arizona a few months before the organization of the Territory, and settled in what is now the city of Prescott. He was born in Frankfort, Kentucky, in 1832. He was graduated in 1854 from the New York College of Medicine as a bachelor of law and physician, in which year he crossed the plains, and for some years thereafter practiced medicine to some extent in California in conjunction with mining and prospecting. Upon his arrival in Arizona he took up mining and prospecting in the vicinity of Prescott. The Apache Indians being troublesome the following winter, he accompanied King Woolsey on an expedition against the tribe as surgeon of the command. He was appointed the first Territorial Treasurer of Arizona, and served during the administration of Governor McCormick. In 1868 he was elected to the Legislature as the representative from Yavapai County. In 1869 in company with his wife’s brother, W. L. Osborn, he settled in the Salt River Valley, about a mile northeast from Phoenix, and thereafter was intimately connected with the development of this section. He was elected to the legislature in 1870, and aided in the organization of Maricopa County. The same year he was Probate Judge of the new county. His term in the Assembly expired in 1872. He was admitted to the practice of the law in Arizona in...

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Biography of Michael Goldwater

One of the earliest business men to settle permanently in Arizona was Michael Goldwater, who came to Arizona in 1860, locating at La Paz on the Colorado River. At that time he was associated in business with Mr. B. Cohen, and founded a large forwarding and trading business besides being Government contractors and merchants. They erected the first mill upon the Vulture Mine, and when it was completed, Mr. Goldwater, with Mr. James Cusenberry, the superintendent, took charge of the property, and ran the mill for about ninety days, paying off all the debts upon it and then turning it back to the owners. In 1870, having large Government freighting contracts and the Colorado River having receded from the town of La Paz, Mr. Goldwater laid out the townsite of Ehrenberg on the Colorado River, as a result of which the town of La Paz was soon abandoned. In 1869 Mr. Goldwater secured a contract to supply Camp Whipple and Fort Verde with corn, but a corner having been made in the market, he was unable to obtain the corn in the Territory, except at a great loss, and travelled overland to New Mexico, where he bought his supply and freighted it in by ox teams to Verde and Whipple. In 1870 he opened a mercantile business in Phoenix, the first store of any size in what is now...

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Biography of Jackson McCracken

Jackson McCracken, a member of the Walker Party, served in the First Legislative Assembly of Arizona Territory in 1861, as a member of the lower house from Yavapai County. He was born in South Carolina in 1828. After his arrival in the territory with the Walker Party, he spent his time in mining and prospecting. Evidently, he was not very fastidious as to dress or personal appearance, for the following story is told of him: After his election, some of his constituents went to him and told him that he was now a member of the First Legislature of the great Territory of Arizona, and he should be dressed and equipped in keeping with the dignity of the office. He replied: “I am in the hands of my constituents.” For answer they said: “All right Jack, we’ll attend to you.” So they formed a committee, took Jack down to Granite Creek, where they had a tub made from the end of a whiskey barrel, filled with water and soap. They gave him a good wash, scrubbed him down with a horse brush, wiped him off well, dressed him up with clean underclothing and a hand me down suit; took him to a barber and had his whiskers and hair trimmed properly, and turned him over to the Legislature, a man of the people, a thoroughly clean and Progressive Democrat....

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