Location: Wyandot County OH

Wyandot Indians

Wyandot Tribe: Meaning perhaps “islanders,” or “dwellers on a peninsula.” Occasionally spelled Guyandot. At an earlier date usually known as Huron, a name given by the French from hurĂ©, “rough,” and the depreciating suffix -on. Also called: Hatindiaβointen, Huron name of Huron of Lorette. Nadowa, a name given to them and many other Iroquoian tribes by Algonquians. Telamatenon, Delaware name, meaning “coming out of a mountain or cave.” Thastchetci’, Onondaga name. Connection. The Wyandot belonged to the Iroquoian linguistic family. Wyandot Location. The earliest known location of the Huron proper was the St. Lawrence Valley and the territory of the present province of Ontario from Lake Ontario across to Georgian Bay. The Tionontati were just west of them on Lake Huron. (See also Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin.) Wyandot Villages There are said to have been four confederated Huron tribes in the time of Champlain. Cartier, who first met these people, gives the following town names: Araste, on or near St. Lawrence River below the site of Quebec. Hagonchenda, on St. Lawrence River not far from the point where it is joined by Jacques Cartier River. Hochelaga, on Montreal Island. Hochelay, probably near Point Platon, Quebec. Satadin, location uncertain. Stadacona, on the site of the present Quebec. Starnatan, just below the site of Quebec. Tailla, near Quebec. Teguenondahi, location uncertain. Tutonaguay, 25 leagues above the site of...

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Biography of James W. Lytle

JAMES W. LYTLE. – To the esteemed and capable gentleman, whose name appears above, we with pleasure accord a representation in this volume of the chronicles of Union county, since he has wrought for many years here for its development, and for the subjstantial progress of the same, manifesting meanwhile, a business ability and energy that have placed him among the leading agriculturists and prominent men of the county, while his unswerving integrity, sound principles and geniality have made him hosts of friends from all classes. Mr. Lytle was born in Wyandot, Ohio, on October 22, 1842, being the son of James and Mary (Anno) Lytle, the father a native of Scotland and the mother of Scottish descent. In 1855 the mother was called by the messenger of death, and on April 1, 1866, the father also passed away. Our subject received his education in the public schools of his native county, and there remained until he had arrived at man’s estate. When he had reached his majority he engaged in farming and raising and feeding stock until 1879. In that year he was determined to try his fortunes in the west, and accordingly came to San Francisco, thence by boat to Portland, and by the same conveyance to Wallula. He took up land in Sherman county, Oregon, remaining a few months, when tidings of the fertile Grande Ronde...

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Biographical Sketch of Alfred Burns Smythe

Smythe, Alfred Burns; banking and real estate; born, Nevada, O., Aug. 4, 1874; son of Marcus and Mary Burns Smythe; educated, common schools and Oberlin Academy and Oberlin College, Oberlin, O.; married, Oil City, Pa., Nov. 13, 1902, Catherine Loomis; issue, two sons, mgr. Real Estate Dept. of The Cleveland Trust Co.; pres. The Land Security Co., The Loop Realty Co., The Seneca Security...

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Biographical Sketch of Arquis L. Sells

Arquis L. Sells a farmer near Westminster, was born in Wyandot County, Ohio, September 6, 1845. His parents, John and Mary (McKissen) Sells, were natives respectively of Ohio and Virginia, and had five children, three of whom are still living. John Sells was a well-known attorney in Wyandot County for a number of years, and died November 19, 1886. Marquis worked on the railroad as a trackman, and subsequently attended school at New Hagerstown and Harlem Springs. Then he taught school for some ten years in Ohio and Missouri, and in May, 1871, he came to California with two brothers and his mother. He first rented land in Santa Barbara County and afterward came to what is now Orange County, purchasing a fine ranch one mile south of Westminster; where he successfully engaged as stock-raiser and general...

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Biographical Sketch of C. C. Zupp

He was born September 18, 1835 to George Peter Zupp (a native of France), and Elizabeth Zeuder of that country. They came to America and located in Pennsylvania. C. C. Zupp was born in Lancaster County, Pa., and when he was 3 years old they went to Wyandot County, Ohio. Three years later, they moved to Hillsdale County, Michigan. At the opening of the Civil War, he enlisted in the Eighteenth Michigan Infantry. After its close, he returned to Michigan, and moved to Buchanan County, Iowa. In 1869, he moved to Section 3, Douglas Township, Ida County, Iowa. At the time of 1869, Ida County cast only 32 votes, and only 3 families resided in Douglas Township. The Judge John H. Moorehead lived at the west edge of where Ida Grove was built later, and there were no homes between Mr. Zupp’s farm in Douglas Township and Mr. Moorehead’s home. The hardships experienced with pioneer life was common then. Mr. Zupp, at the age of 19, first married Jennie Crawfoot, a native of New York, and a daughter of Seth and Ann Eliza Crawfoot. To this union was born two children: A. D. and Ida. In 1867, Mr. Zupp was united in marriage with Julia Crawfoot, a sister of his former wife, and they had the following children: Jennie (wife of M. G. Sherman of Cushing, Ia); Jessie; Will;...

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