Location: Winchendon Massachusetts

Biography of David Warren Cogswell

David Warren Cogswell, one of Henniker’s most highly esteemed residents and a prominent Odd Fellow, was born in this town, January 1, 1824, son of David and Hannah (Haskell) Cogswell. His father, who was a son of Joseph Cogswell, was a native of Essex, Mass., born April 25, 1790. David Cogswell learned the blacksmith’s trade with David Choate in his native town, and worked for a time as a journeyman on Cape Ann. He was First Lieutenant of a Gloucester Military Company during the War of 1812, and subsequently received for his services a warrant for one hundred and sixty acres of land. In 1815 he settled in Henniker, where he established a blacksmith shop near the stone bridge; and, as from forty to sixty horses were constantly employed in transporting goods between Boston and Vermont, his shop was for many years a favorite place for horse-shoeing and repairing. 1850, when he sold the shop to his son; and for some years afterward he divided his time between the forge and his farm. In 1820 he erected the house which is now occupied by David W., and he resided in it for nearly fifty years. Being a man of temperate habits, he was strong and vigorous. At his death, on June 30, 1868, which was caused by a cancer in the stomach, he was over seventy-eight years old. On...

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David Todd of Charlemont MA

David Todd6, (Titus5, Titus4, Benjamin3, Michael2, Christopher1) born March 17, 1807, died in 1880, married Dec. 1, 1831, Clarissa Bradford of Williamsburg, Mass., who was born Sept. 15, 1808, died in 1884. She was in the sixth generation in direct line from Governor Bradford of the Mayflower and Plymouth Colony. He was a Methodist Clergyman and as to his pastorates, his son, Stephen Olin Todd says: “soon after he began preaching he was located at Winchendon, Mass.; thence to Haddam or Haddam Neck, Conn., about 1834, he went next to Hebron, Conn., in 1836, later he was at Londenderry and Wilmington, Vt., about 1848 to 1852; thence to Amherst, Mass., 1853; Feeding Hills, Mass., 1854; and South Deerfield, Mass., 1855.” Retiring he bought a place at South Deerfield where he lived until 1863; thence he moved to Charlemont, Mass., where he lived until his death in 1880. His widow sold their place in Charlemont in 1883, and went to live with her daughter Ruth, who then lived in St. Johnsbury Center, Vt., where she died four years later. He was chosen selectman in Charlemont, Mass., in the year 1869. His son says about this fact: “it is strange what little circumstances alter relations. The year my father was selectman, heavy rains gutted a large number of the town’s roads, so badly that the tax rate had to be increased,...

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