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Location: Waukegan Illinois

Biographical Sketch of Atlantic A. Moore

Atlantic A. Moore, during the twenty-four years that he resided in Kansas, assisted in the founding of Marion County and became a familiar and respected figure in both houses of the State Legislature. He was familiarly known as “Lank” Moore. A native of Ohio, he came to Wankegan, Illinois, as a boy, living there and in Wisconsin until he “entered the government service” with his brother, as a driver of ambulances from Kansas City to Santa Fe. Not caring to settle in that part of the Southwest, they started on their return in the fall of the same year. At Cottonwood Crossing (now Durham, Kansas) on the Santa Fe trail, a man named Smith had built a small log cabin and was running a trading post, selling whisky, canned goods and other provisions to passing trains. The Moore brothers bought out the place, and later took up a claim at what became known as Moore’s Ranch. In the spring of 1861 a postoffice was established there, with A. A. Moore as postmaster. That year the Town of Marion Center was also laid out, and there Mr. Moore built a store and otherwiso identified himself with the growth of the place. Upon the organization of Marion County in 1865 he was elected county treasuror and representative; was returned to the Legislature in 1867; served in the State Senate in 1868,...

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Biography of George M. Gray, M. D.

George M. Gray, M. D. There is hardly a more eminent physician and surgeon in the State of Kansas than Dr. George M. Gray, of Kansas City, Kansas. He is ex-president of the Kansas State Medical Society, a member of the American Medical Association, and has been accorded the honor of a fellowship in the American College of Surgeons. In 1915 Governor Capper appointed him a member of the State Board of Medical Registration and Examination for Kansas and he is now president of the board. Doctor Gray has been in active practice at Kansas City, Kansas, for more than thirty-five years, and for the greater part of that time has been head of the staff of St. Margaret’s Hospital. His attainments and the service he has rendered in his profession are not the only distinctions to be associated with his name. Doctor Gray is properly considered as the father of the park and boulevard system of Kansas City, Kansas. For years he has worked and planned for an adequate system of driveways and parks, and many of the ideas of the project now being put into execution originated in his mind. In March, 1907, the Kansas Legislature passed the law giving Kansas City, Kansas, authority to organize a park board, and permitting the board to levy special taxes for a park and boulevard system. A test was made...

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Biography of John Ellis

John Ellis. Within the lifetime of John Ellis, El Dorado banker, stockman and farmer, had been unfolded practically the entire history of civilization in Butler County. He came here when a boy of five or six years. Kansas was still a territory, and his people located on the very fringe of settlement and in what was then and for a number of years afterward regarded as Southwestern Kansas. Few of the old timers can look back to a time in Butler County when its prairies supported herds of buffalo, but John Ellis recalls having seen as many as 150 in a single drove. Wherever the buffalo was found in the West there also was the Indian. John Ellis knew the wild and untamed redmen of the West when he was a boy, though he never met them when on hostile excursions, and so far as his experience goes Butler County was never a scene of violence on the part of the redmen. However, parties of them frequently went through Butler County on hunting trips, and with other boys of his time he shared in the fright caused by Indian scares, though reports of the coming of hostile Indians were almost universally unfounded in real danger. For several years after the buffalo disappeared from the prairies the wild deer were still numerous, and John Ellis was old enough to carry...

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Biography of Rev. R. F. Sweet, D. D.

The old axiom which tells us that kind deeds and gentle words live forever is one which not only inspires the mind with its sublimity, but its truth is so often brought home to us, and so forcibly that it affords a solace we do not always feel. A noble life invariably begets its full measure of love and veneration, and even though myriads of kindness done and self-sacrificing efforts are lost to earth the hand-maidens of the Great Seer of Heaven have the fullest knowledge of them all. All men who have been so graciously endowed with that most precious of all human attributes-love for his fellow-men-have been amply repaid for their self-obligation, generosity and charity; for their weakness, submissiveness and obedience to the mandates of the Deity. This truism was abundantly exemplified during the lifetime of Reverend R. F. Sweet, and substantiated by the wealth of love which his memory impels. Instead of donning the robes and authority of a bishop an elevation twice proffered him, Mr. Sweet preferred to retain the modest position of rector, so that he could more generally and more frequently minister to humanity; unassuming to the extreme, he nevertheless accomplished in-conceivable good and lightened numerous burdens worldly and spiritual, and was con-tent to reap the harvest of brotherly love which was his, rather than hoard sordid accumulations. Even this brief reflection of...

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Biography of Hon. Elisha P. Ferry

HON. ELISHA P. FERRY. – Mr. Ferry was born at Monroe, Michigan, August 9, 1825. He studied law there and at Fort Wayne, Indiana, and was admitted to the bar in 1845 at the age of twenty years. In 1846 he removed to Waukegan, Illinois, where he engaged in the practice of his profession. He resided at Waukegan until July, 1869, when he removed to the territory of Washington. He was the first mayor of the city of Waukegan. In 1852 and in 1856 he was presidential elector for the district in which he resided. He was a member of the constitutional convention in Illinois in 1861. From 1861 to 1863 he was bank commissioner in that state. During these years he was a member of Governor Yates’ staff as assistant adjutant-general with the rank of colonel, and assisted in organizing, equipping and sending into the field a large number of Illinois regiments. In 1869 he was appointed surveyor-general of Washington Territory. In 1872 he was appointed governor of the territory, and was reappointed in 1876. All of these appointments were conferred upon him by President Grant. He served as governor until November, 1880, when he moved to Seattle and became a member of the law firm of McNaught, Ferry, McNaught & Mitchell. In September, 1887, he retired from the practice of law and entered the Puget Sound National...

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