Location: Washington County VA

Narrative of the Captivity of of Mrs. Francis Scott – Indian Captivities

A True and Wonderful Narrative of the Surprising Captivity and remarkable deliverance of Mrs. Francis Scott, an inhabitant of Washington County, Virginia, who was taken by the Indians on the evening of the 29th of June, 1785. On Wednesday, the 29th day of June, 1785, late in the evening, a large company of armed men passed the house on their way to Kentucky, some part of whom encamped within two miles. Mr. Scott’s living on a frontier part generally made the family watchful; but on this calamitous day, after so large a body of men had passed; he lay down in his bed, and imprudently left one of the doors of his house open; the children were also in bed and asleep. Mrs. Scott was nearly undressed, when, to her unutterable astonishment and horror, she saw rushing in through the door, that was left open, painted savages, with their arms presented at the same time, raising a hideous shriek. Mr. Scott, being awake, instantly jumped from his bed, and was immediately fired at. He forced his way through the midst of the enemy, and got out of the house, but fell a few paces from the door. An Indian seized Mrs. Scott, and ordered her to a particular place, charging her not to move. Others stabbed and cut the throats of the three youngest children in their bed, and...

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Biography of Thomas Sharp

Thomas Sharp was a native of Ireland, but emigrated to America, and settled first in Pennsylvania, from whence he removed to Washington Co., Va. He was married twice, and by his first wife he had John, Thomas, Jr., and Benjamin. By his second wife he had but one child, David, who became a Methodist minister, and lived and died in Virginia. Thomas, Jr., settled in Kentucky. Benjamin was a soldier in the revolutionary war, and was in Colonel Campbell’s command at the battle of King’s Mountain. He married Hannah Fulkerson, of Virginia, and their children were James F.. John D., Polly C., Jacob L., Catharine E., Attosa P., Hannah D., Peter L , Elvira E., Malinda M., Margaret J., and Benjamin F. In 1816 Mr. Sharp removed to Missouri with all his family except John and Malinda, and settled in (now) Warren County, three miles east of Pinckney. When Montgomery County was organized in 1818, he was appointed Clerk of the County and Circuit Courts and held the position until the State was admitted into the Union. A small log cabin was built in his yard and used as a court house, until the County seat was located at Pinckney, which was named for his daughter, Atossa Pinckney Sharp. Mr. Sharp died at the old Roinstead in 1843; his wife died two years previous. Their son James married Catharine...

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Biographical Sketch of David Dryden

David Dryden, of Pennsylvania, married Barbara Berry, and settled in Washington County, Va., where he and his wife both died. Their children were Jonathan, David, Nathaniel, William, Thomas, Rebecca, Elizabeth, and Mary. Jonathan married Fanny Duff, and lived and died in Kentucky. David was married twice, the name of his second wife being Jane Laughlan. He settled in Blunt County, Tenn. Nathaniel was also married twice; first to Ellen Laughlan, a daughter of Alexander and Ann Laughlan, but she died without children. Mr. Dryden was married the second time to Margaret Craig, a daughter of Robert Craig, who was a son of a revolutionary soldier, and they had Frederick H., John D. S., Ellen E., Mary R, Jane R., Louisa W., Thomas A., Margaret, David C., Caroline, and William P. Mr. Dryden represented Washington County, Va., in the Legislature of that State before he came to. Missouri, and after he settled in Montgomery County in 1829, he represented that County in the Missouri Legislature several terms. He also held other important positions in the County, and was an influential and highly esteemed citizen. He died in 1858, in his. 75th year; his widow still survives, in her 83d...

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Biography of James Fulkerson

Fulkerson (This name in the native tongue, was Volkerson, but after the removal of the family to America they began to spell it as it is pronounced.) James Fulkerson, of Germany, came to America at an early date and settled in North Carolina. There he became acquainted with and married Mary VanHook, and subsequently removed to Washington Co., Va. The names of their children were Peter, James, John, Thomas, Abraham, Jacob, Isaac, William, Polly, Catharine, Hannah, and Mary. Peter married Margaret Craig, and they had Polly, Robert C., James, Benjamin F., Jacob, Peter, Jr., John W., Margaret, Rachel, David C., and Frederick. Of these children Robert C., Benjamin F., and Frederick settled in Missouri. The former (Robert C.) was born in Lee Co., Va., August 27, 1794. He served as a soldier in the war of 1812, was afterward elected Colonel of militia, and took part in the Black Hawk war in 1834. He first came to Missouri in 1816, with Major Benjamin Sharp, but remained only a short time, when he returned to Virginia, where he resided until 1828. During that period he served his County for seven years in the capacity of Sheriff, an office which at that time was beset with many dangers and hardships, requiring a man of nerve and determination to discharge its duties. So faithful was he in the performance of his labors,...

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Biographical Sketch of S.E.H. Dance, M.D.

S. E. H. Dance, M. D., the leading physician of Lynchburg, Tennessee, was born March 30, 1834, son of Stephen M. and Sarah (Smith) Dance, born in Virginia and North Carolina, and died in 1853 and 1862, respectively, they came to Lincoln County about 1826. The father was a farmer of ordinary means and a local minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Our subject spent his boyhood days on a farm and at the time of his father’s death was attending Emory and Henry College, Virginia. He returned home and began the study of medicine and attended one course of lectures, in 1854-55 in the University of Tennessee. He graduated from the Louisville (Kentucky) Medical College in 1856 and began practicing his profession in Lynchburg. During the war he was assistant surgeon of Turney’s First Tennessee, and in 1862 was promoted to surgeon of the Eighth Tennessee, continuing until near the close of the conflict, when he was made medical director for the reserves of Tennessee. After his return from the battle field he resumed his profession in Lynchburg, in which he has met with good success. September 16, 1856, he married Miami A. Berry, and eight children blessed their union; Edward M., William H., Charles H., Frank P., Fannie, Robert R., Harry H. and Clifford C. In 1883 Dr. Dance and his son, William H., opened a drugstore...

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Biography of J. H. Berry

This gentleman is one of the oldest residents of Marion County, Arkansas, and through his enterprise, energy and push he has done much to make that section the prosperous region that it is. He was born in Washington County, Virginia, April 26, 1824, being the third of eight children born to Samuel and Sarah (Hickey) Berry, the former of whom was born in Washington County, Virginia, in 1796, his parents being William and Elizabeth (Duff) Berry. William Berry was a Virginian also, but his father, John Berry, was a native of the State of New York, and in his day was in many engagements with the Indians. Elizabeth Duff was born on the ocean when her parents were on their way to this country. In 1843 Samuel Berry emigrated to Missouri, the journey thither bring made in a wagon which he himself had made, and a location was made in what is now Webster County, the father taking up a tract of Government land. In tilling the soil and raising stock he acquired a good property and became a highly-respected and honored citizen. He was a stanch Democrat, a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and in 1844 was called to that bourne whence no traveler returns. The maternal grand-parents of the subject of this sketch were William and Rachael Hickey who spent their lives in Virginia, in which...

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Slave Narrative of Lucretia Alexander

Interviewer: Samuel S. Taylor Person Interviewed: Lucretia Alexander Location: 1708 High Street, Little Rock, Arkansas Age: 89 Occupation: Washed. Ironed. Plowed. Hoed “I been married three times and my last name was Lucretia Alexander. I was twelve years old when the War began. My mother died at seventy-three or seventy-five. That was in August 1865—August the ninth. She was buried August twelfth. The reason they kept her was they had refugeed her children off to different places to keep them from the Yankees. They couldn’t get them back. My mother and her children were heir property. Her first master was Toliver. My mother was named Agnes Toliver. She had a boy and a girl both older than I were. My brother come home in ’65. I never got to see my sister till 1869. “My father died in 1881 and some say he was one hundred twelve and some say one hundred six. His name was Beasley, John Beasley, and he went by John Beasley till he died. “My mother died and left four living children. I was the youngest. “I got religion in 1865. I was baptized seventy-three years ago this August. “I ain’t got nary living child. My oldest child would have been sixty-four if he were living. They claim my baby boy is living, but I don’t know. I have four children. “The first overseer I...

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Biography of James W. Reid

Idaho has won distinction for the high rank of her bench and bar. Perhaps none of the newer states can justly boast of abler jurists or attorneys. Some of them have been men of national fame, and among those whose lives have been passed on a quieter plane there is scarcely a town or city in the state but can boast of one or more lawyers capable of crossing swords in forensic combat with any of the distinguished legal lights of the United States. Idaho certainly has reason to be proud of her legal fraternity. In James W. Reid we find united many of the rare qualities which go to make up the successful lawyer, and he is today regarded as one of the most prominent representatives of the bar of the state. He possesses perhaps few of those dazzling, meteoric qualities which have sometimes flashed along the legal horizon, riveting the gaze and blinding the vision for the moment, then disappearing, leaving little or no trace behind: but he has, rather, those solid and more substantial qualities which shine with a constant luster, shedding light in the dark places with steadiness and continuity. He has in an eminent degree that rare ability of saying in a convincing way the right thing at the right time. His mind is analytical, logical and inductive, and with a thorough and comprehensive...

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Biography of Jesse L. Blakemore, M. D.

Dr. Jesse L. Blakemore, a physician and surgeon of Muskogee since 1891 and now president of the Physicians and Surgeons Hospital of this city, was born in Greenwood, Arkansas, and after acquiring a public school education continued his studies in the Emory and Henry College of Virginia, there completing his course with the class of 1885. His liberal literary training has served as an excellent foundation on which to build the superstructure of professional knowledge. Desiring to become a physician, he matriculated in the medical department of Vanderbilt University at Nashville, Tennessee, and was graduated with the class of 1888. He has further pursued his studies in the New York City Polyclinic College and private reading and research into the standard literature of the profession have also greatly promoted his efficiency. In the year 1891 he opened an office in Muskogee and through the intervening period, covering three decades, he has remained in general practice here. He is most careful in the diagnosis of his cases and most conscientious in the performance of all professional duties and by reason of his ability, his sympathy and his helpfulness he has become the loved family physician in many of the leading households of the city. He has also done splendid hospital work as one of the promoters of the Physicians and Surgeons Hospital, of which he is now the president. His...

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Biographical Sketch of James Shoemaker

James Shoemaker, farming and stock; P. O. Loxa; the subject of this sketch was born in Washington Co., Va., Feb. 19, 1825. He married Miss Tabitha Mason Sept. 3, 1863; she was born in Fayette Co., Ky., Aug. 30, 1840; they had seven children, four living, viz., Mary E., William K., James S. and Franklin R. He lived in Virginia nearly ten years, when, with his parents, he came to Illinois and settled in Coles Co., one mile north of Charleston; this was in December, 1834; they lived there four years, then moved to La Fayette Township, on the Springfield road, five miles west of Charleston; while there, his father died; in 1850, he came to his present place, he being the first settler in this part of the township. In 1862, he enlisted in the 123d I. V. I., which, after four months’ service, was mounted; he held the position of First Lieutenant; he remained in the service nearly one year, and took part in the battles of Perryville and Milton, and also the minor engagements of the regiment. He has held the office of Assessor two years, and was Supervisor of Humbolt Tp. for the years 1865 and 1866. He owns 382 acres in this county, which he has earned by his own labor and management. His parents, John and Annie Brown Shoemaker, were natives of North...

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Biographical Sketch of J. W. Hill

J. W. Hill, farmer and stock-dealer, deceased; deceased owned 342 acres; was born in Washington Co., Va., May 7, 1814; died March 13, 1875; he lived with his parents on the farm until 20 years of age. He was married to Elizabeth Fudge Feb. 28, 1833; she was born in Washington Co., Va., Jan. 15, 1814; they had twelve children – Barbara A., Samuel H., Benjamin R., Noah W., Elizabeth, Zachariah T., Emma, Jonah, Napoleon and three infants, deceased; Jonah Hill was born in Coles Co., Ill., April 22, 1853, and lived with his father until 21 years of age. He then married Mattie A. Barr Oct. 17, 1878; she was born in Coles Co., Ill., Jan. 6, 1864. Mr. J. W. Hill commenced business on the farm where he died, in this township, with only $2.50, and in a few years of industry and economy, he accumulated and left at his death a large amount of...

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Biography of Col. Joseph L. Meek

COL. JOSEPH L. MEEK. – As one of the remarkable mountainmen of our early age, “Jo” Meek is deserving of special mention. Aside from the class of men of whom he was one of the best types, he possessed an unusual personality of his own. This led him to so conspicuous a place in our early annals that his frequent appearance in the body of the work makes an extended notice here unnecessary. We shall present only the salient features of his remarkable career. Born in Washington county, Virginia, in 1810, he early developed a love of wandering which...

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Biographical Sketch of H. A. Pemberton

H. A. Pemberton, farmer, Sec. 18; P. O. Oakland; one of the pioneers of Coles County; born in Washington Co., Va., Aug. 22, 1822; he emigrated with his parents when quite young, and located in Coles Co., Ill., in November 1831, upon the place where he has since lived during the a period of nearly half a century; he is the youngest son of Stanton and Sarah Pemberton; his father died in 1838; seven years after his settlement here, and his mother died in 1850; after the death of his father, he and an older brother managed the place until 1860 at which time his brother died without family, and Mr. P. became possessor of the old homestead where he now lives. He owns 240 acres of land mostly under a good state of cultivation, which he has assisted to reclaim from its wild prairie condition. He married Nov. 14, 1850, to Elizabeth Hicks; she was born in Indiana June 21, 1830. They have three children by this union-Sally S., Jackson J., Stanton C; Mr. Pemberton has been School Director for upward of thirty years, and has held the office of Road Commissioner for the last three years in the Township in which he...

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Biographical Sketch of J. J. Pemberton

J. J. Pemberton, retired merchant, Oakland; one of the early pioneers of Coles Co.; born in Washington Co., Va., Dec. 5, 1814, where he attended school in winter, and assisted his father farming in summer, until 17 years of age, when he emigrated West and located in East Oakland Tp., Coles Co., Ill., in 1831, in which township he has since lived, for a period of nearly half a century; from 1831 to 1838, he was engaged in farming, when he removed to Oakland and engaged in hotel-keeping four years, at the expiration of which time he engaged in the general merchandise trade, at Oakland, which business he followed until 1875, when he retired from the above business, at which time he was elected Justice of the Peace, which office he now holds. He held the office of Postmaster at Oakland for several years; he was appointed assistant revenue officer for this district under the administration of President Lincoln, the position at the time being attended with much danger, from the feeling manifested in some localities to resist the execution of the law taxing incomes; his friends, who were numerous, often cautioned and tried to dissuade him from attempting to execute the law in localities where the worst element prevailed, but he knew no fear where duty called him, and performed the same fearlessly until the expiration of his...

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