Location: Washington County ID

Washington County, Idaho Pioneer Honor Roll

In 1940 and 1943, a survey of everyone who had lived in Washington County, Idaho continuously for 50 years or more, was made by the Weiser American. These pioneer residents were especially honored at the Fall Festival held in the fall of both years. So far as is known, the list compiled by the survey is complete and perhaps the only record of its kind in existence.

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Washington County Its Towns, Resources, Etc.

Washington County lies on the western border of the state of Idaho, and about five hundred miles from the Pacific coast. It contains a large area of land suited to various purposes. It has a population of over five thousand people. Its inhabitants are, generally speaking, enterprising and thrifty people, many of them having settled here in the early 6o”s and have remained ever since. The early settler devoted himself to stock-raising and placer-mining, and he thought that was all the county was fit for. But as the county began settling up it was soon found that anything which grew in a temperate climate would grow here. Washington County is now considered to be a kingdom within itself, as it produces everything necessary for comfort and happiness. Its resources are so varied that it would be impossible to mention all of them in this connection. Agriculture and kindred industries are pursued more at present than anything else. This in the past has been confined largely to the raising of wheat and hay. But of late years our farmers have been planting large orchards and diversifying their products generally. Anywhere in the valleys all kind of grain, fruits and cereals can be successfully grown. Wherever Washington county fruit is exhibited it always carries away a premium. At a recent state fair held in Boise, Washington County carried off more premiums...

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The Mining Fields Of Idaho

The following excellent monograph by W. C. Austin was issued in pamphlet form early in the present year (1899) by authority of C. J. Bassett, state commissioner of immigration, labor and statistics, and as a valuable contribution to the history of the great mining industry of Idaho is held to be worthy of reproduction in this work: There is no other country on God’s green earth that has encompassed within her borders such vast and varied mineral wealth as Idaho. The position that Idaho occupies in the western mineral world is like a wagon wheel, of which Idaho is the hub, while her great mineral belts, radiating out from her mountain fastnesses, penetrating her sister states and enriching them, represent the spokes. Place yourself before a map and trace out several of these great mineral belts. Beginning in the southern part of California, the belt runs through Eldorado, Mariposa and Calaveras counties, thence to Bodie across into Nevada in a northeasterly course, giving birth to the great Comstock lode and other camps, through by Winnemucca, and in Idaho makes its grand entry at Silver City and De Lamar, in Owyhee county; thence on in through Rocky Bar and Atlanta, Custer and Bonanza; thence on to central Idaho, at Gibbonsville. Here the opposite spoke to the great mineral wheel comes in and penetrates the Rocky mountains on into Montana, where...

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Biography of Cornelius G. Morehead

A native of the Web foot State, the son of about the earliest pioneers of this state, raised amid its environments, both eastern and western Oregon, the subject of this article is thoroughly an Oregonian and a typical representative of its energetic and progressive citizens. Cornelius G. was born in Linn County, Oregon, on June 26, 1865, being the son of Robert M. and Martha (Curl) Morehead. The parents came with ox teams to Oregon in 1848 and settled in the Willamette valley and the father being a millwright, built the first mill of the state. It was located at Salem and was built in 1849. In 1869, the family removed to Jackson County; Oregon, and in 1872, they came to Prairie City, Grant County, this state. There the father erected the Strawberry flour mills and in 1879 sold out and Went to Weiser, Idaho. He built a mill there and in 1887 he returned to the Willamette valley, where he died in 1890. Mrs. Morehead is still living in Douglas County, this state. Our subject was educated in the schools of the various places where lie lived and in 1884 he started for himself. He raised stock in Idaho until 1888, then sold out and came to Malheur County and engaged with the Oregon Horse and Land Company, where he wrought for a number of years. During this...

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Biographical Sketch of Charles M. Jones

It is gratifying to be privileged to put in print an epitome of one of the brave men who fought, as did the subject of this sketch for the honor of the stars and stripes and the safety of our free institutions when the foul hand of treason sought to deface all and destroy the homes of freedom. In addition Mr. Jones has always shown himself in the walks of life to be upright and capable and has done a noble part in the advancement and development of the resources of the country. Speaking more particularly of his personal history, we note that his birth occurred in Hickman County, Tennessee on August 13, 1836, being the son of Stephen and Jane Jones. He was reared amid the environments of a farm and gained his education from the schools held in the log cabins of the clay. Our subject remained at home until he had reached manhood’s estate, and in October, 1857, he was married to Miss Emily M. Downey in Searcy County, Arkansas, and soon thereafter went to Marion County, in Arkansas. And there, when the war broke out, he offered his services for freedom’s cause. The date of his actual enlistment was August 6, 1862, at which time he was mustered into Company C, First Arkansas Cavalry, in the volunteer army. He was under Colonel Harrison and was...

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Biography of Thomas C. Galloway

Thomas C. Galloway. The first settler of Weiser was the gentleman whose name introduces this article. Before the town was founded he located on land that is now within its borders, and since that period has been actively identified with the growth and development of the little hamlet which has become one of the flourishing cities of Idaho. His residence in the state covers a period of thirty-six years, and as time has passed he has risen to a position among the most successful stock-dealers and business men of the commonwealth. His landed and other possessions are now very extensive, and he is thereby enabled to live a retired life “crowning a youth of labor with an age of ease.” Mr. Galloway was born at Mineral Point, Iowa county, Wisconsin, on the 6th of June, 1837, and is of Scotch descent. His grandfather, Charles Galloway, was a native of the land of hills and heather, whence he emigrated to America, locating in Richmond, Virginia. When the British empire began to encroach on the liberties of the colonists he joined the Americans in their opposition to such measures, and fought throughout the greater part of the war for independence. He was at Yorktown and witnessed the surrender of Lord Cornwallis to General Washington. His son, Charles Galloway, was born in Virginia, in 1798, and wedded Miss Mary Haney, who was...

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Biography of Fred S. Watt

Fred S. Watt, cashier of the Lovewell State Bank, is a man of exceptlonal ability and widely known in Jewell County, and besides his banking duties is also pastor of the United Brethren Church at Lovewell. Mr. Watt was born in Webster County, Nebraska, July 30, 1879. He is of English ancestry but the family located in Pennsylvania in colonial times. His grandfather, John Watt, was born in Indiana in 1810 and in 1871 became one of the piommer settlers in Webster County, Nebraska, where he homesteaded 160 acres near Guide Rock. He was a practical farmer, and spent his last years in comfortable retirement at Gulde Rock, where he died in 1891. He married Elizabeth Adams, who was born in Ohio in 1815 and died at Guide Rock, Nebraska, in 1899. Five of their children are still living: James, a retired farmer at Guide Rock; Fred, who follows the trade of butcher at Guide Rock; L. L., a retired hotel man at Guide Rock; Frank Watt; and Addle, who is living at Guide Rock, widow of Charles Ely, who was a farmer. Frank Watt, father of Fred S., was born in Vermilion County, Illinois, in 1857, and was fourteen years of age when his parents removed to the frontier of Nebraska. He grew up there, and on reaching his majority homesteaded eighty acres of land and had developed...

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Biography of Solomon M. Jeffreys

In the front rank of the columns which have advanced the civilization of the northwest, Solomon M. Jeffreys has led the way to the substantial development, progress and up building of Idaho, being particularly active in the growth of Weiser, where he still makes his home. He is numbered among the pioneers of Idaho, California and Oregon, his memory going back to the time when the entire Pacific coast was but very sparsely settled, when the Indians were more numerous than the white men, and the land had not been reclaimed for purposes of cultivation, but remained in the primitive condition in which it came from the hand of nature. Mr. Jeffreys was born in Jackson County, Missouri, February 11, 1835, and is of English lineage. His father, Thomas Jeffreys, was born in Kentucky and was married there to Miss Mary Dickerson. In 1845, with his wife and five children, he started for Oregon with a train of sixty wagons, drawn by oxen and mules, there being about two hundred persons in the company. They were nine months in making the long and tedious journey across the plains and endured many hardships and privations. Their route lay along the south and west banks of the Snake River, but they little dreamed that in the course of a few years members of their Party would locate in that beautiful district...

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Biography of Augustus G. Upton, A. M., D. D.

Although Dr. Upton has been a resident of Weiser for little more than three years he has been so closely and prominently connected with the educational and moral interests of the town during that time that no history of the community would be complete without the record of his career. It is a widely acknowledged fact that the most important work to which man can direct his energies is that of teaching, whether it be from the pulpit, from the lecture platform or from the schoolroom. Its primary object is ever the same, the development of one’s latent powers that the duties of life may be bravely met and well performed. The intellectual and the moral nature are so closely allied that it is difficult to instruct one without in a measure influencing the other, and certainly the best results are accomplished when the work goes hand in hand. Christian instruction is having an influence over the world that few can estimate, for it is in youth that the life of the man is marked out, his future course decided and his choice as to the good or evil made. It is to this work of thus instructing the young that Dr. Upton devotes his time, energies and thought, and as the president of the Weiser College and Academy his influence in this direction is most widely felt. He...

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Biography of James P. Gray

Thirty-five years have passed since James P. Gray came to Idaho to cast in his lot with its pioneers. People of the present end-of-the-century period can scarcely realize the struggles and dangers which attended the early settlers, the heroism and self-sacrifice of lives passed upon the borders of civilization, the hardships endured, the difficulties overcome. These tales of the early days read almost like a romance to those who have known only the modern prosperity and conveniences. To the pioneer of the early days, far removed from the privileges and conveniences of city or town, the struggle for existence was a stern and hard one, and these men and women must have possessed indomitable energies and sterling worth of character, as well as marked physical courage, when they thus voluntarily selected such a life and successfully fought its battles under such circumstances as prevailed in the northwest. James P. Gray was a young man of eighteen years when he took up his residence in the mining camp at Idaho City. His early life was spent in Illinois, his birth having occurred in Peoria County, that state, December 10, 1846. He is of Scotch-Irish ancestry, and his grandfather, William Gray, emigrated from the north of Ireland with his wife, taking up his residence in Indiana, where occurred the birth of Thomas Gray, the father of our subject. In the Hoosier...

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Biography of Joseph D. Daly

Among the officers of Ada County, Idaho, is Joseph DeWitt Daly, who is now acceptably filling the position of tax collector and assessor. He possesses that spirit of enterprise which has produced the rapid and wonderful development of the vast region west of the Mississippi, and in the discharge of his duties manifests a loyalty and faithfulness that has made his service most efficient, winning him the commendation of the best citizens of the community. A native of Missouri, he was born in Putnam County, on the 13th of January 1850, his parents being William and Permelia (Holland) Daly. His father was a native of Kentucky, born in 1801, and by occupation was a farmer. He continued his residence in Missouri until 1852, when he removed to Oregon, his death occurring at his home near Jacksonville, that state, in September, 1892. His wife, who was born in Tennessee, in 181 1, died in Missouri, in 1866. This worthy couple were the parents of twelve children, ten of whom are living. Six of the sons were soldiers in the Union army during the civil war, and two of them served throughout the entire conflict. Few families can show such a record for military valor or have so effectively labored for the welfare of the nation. Six brothers loyally following the old flag and defending the cause it represented, is a...

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Biography of Andrew B. Anderson

Mr. Anderson, who is president of the Weiser Bank, at Weiser, and chairman of the board of commissioners of Washington County, dates his residence in Idaho from 1869. He is a native of Kentucky, his birth having occurred in Louisville, February 21, 1846. He is of Scotch-Irish ancestry, the family having been founded in America by Thomas Anderson, the grandfather, who crossed the Atlantic in early manhood, taking up his residence in Kentucky. He aided his adopted country in the war of 1812, and also participated in the battles with the Indians during the early settlement of the “dark and bloody ground.” He married a Miss Henry, a native of that state, and their son Joseph, father of our subject, was born and reared in Kentucky. He married Miss Rachel Henry, a distant relative of his mother, and in 1848 removed with his family to Missouri. They continued their westward journey in 1860, when the father, accompanied by his wife and four children, started across the plains to California. He took up his abode in Butte County, and there resided until his death, which occurred in the sixty-fifth year of his age, while his wife lived to be fifty-five years of age. Three of their children still survive, two being residents of the Golden state. Andrew Bradley Anderson was only two years of age when the family went to...

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Biography of Malcolm McGregor

Among the enterprises of Weiser which are alike creditable to the city and to their proprietors is the Vendome Hotel, which was built by its present owners and managers, Messrs. McGregor and Coakley, and by them opened for business in February, 1891. Since that time the hotel has gained a very favorable reputation with the traveling public and enjoys a large patronage. It is a brick structure, two stories high, and contains twenty-eight rooms, well finished, well furnished, well ventilated and nicely kept. Great care is given to the perfection of all arrangements which will contribute to the comfort of the guests, and from the daintily spread tables, supplied with all the delicacies of the season, to the tastefully appointed parlors, all is harmonious and attractive. Malcolm McGregor, the senior member of the firm of McGregor & Coakley, was born in Pictou, Nova Scotia, on the 14th of January 1845, and in his youth learned the machinist’s trade. He afterward operated a stationary engine and worked at his trade both in San Francisco, California, and Virginia City, Nevada. In 1871 he removed to Silver City, Idaho, where he accepted the position of chief engineer of the Ida Elmore mine and mill. He also conducted the Idaho Hotel there for some time, but came to Weiser in 1885. Here he engaged in raising sheep, also conducted a hotel, but abandoned...

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Biography of E. M. Barton

There is probably no better criterion of the growing and prosperous condition of a town or city than its hotel interests. The town which is self-centered, having no connection with the out-side world, is unprogressive, its business stagnates, and its residents become lacking in enterprise, but if connected with outside affairs, travel and commerce add new life and energy, and there is a demand for entertainment on the part of the visitors, which makes good hotels a necessity. One of the most popular hostelries in this section of the state is known as the Weiser Hotel, owned by the Barton Brothers, and under the personal management of the gentleman whose name introduces this review. He has gained for his house a reputation that is far-reaching, and its excellence in every particular has secured it a very liberal patronage. The hotel building was completed in February, 1897, and is built of brick, the main building being one hundred and ten by thirty-two feet, two stories in height with basement, while the wing is thirty by seventy feet and of the same height. The hotel contains thirty-nine rooms furnished and fitted up in modern style and supplied with the latest improvements and conveniences. E. M. Barton, its manager, is a very genial, courteous gentleman, and as he does all in his power to make his guests comfortable he has become a...

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Biography of James B. Coakley

Among the enterprises of Weiser which are alike creditable to the city and to their proprietors is the Vendome Hotel, which was built by its present owners and managers, Messrs. McGregor and Coakley, and by them opened for business in February, 1891. Since that time the hotel has gained a very favorable reputation with the traveling public and enjoys a large patronage. It is a brick structure, two stories high, and contains twenty-eight rooms, well finished, well furnished, well ventilated and nicely kept. Great care is given to the perfection of all arrangements which will contribute to the comfort of the guests, and from the daintily spread tables, supplied with all the delicacies of the season, to the tastefully appointed parlors, all is harmonious and attractive. Malcolm McGregor, the senior member of the firm of McGregor & Coakley, was born in Picton, Nova Scotia, on the 14th of January 1845, and in his youth learned the machinist’s trade. He afterward operated a stationary engine and worked at his trade both in San Francisco. California, and Virginia City, Nevada. In 1871 he removed to Silver City, Idaho, where he accepted the position of chief engineer of the Ida Elmore mine and mill. He also conducted the Idaho Hotel there for some time, but came to Weiser in 1885. Here he engaged in raising sheep, also conducted a hotel, but abandoned...

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