Location: Warren County KY

Biographical Sketch of George Gray

George Gray, of Scotland, emigrated to America previous to the revolution, and when that war began he joined the American army and served during the entire struggle. He had several brothers in the British army during the same war. Before leaving Scotland, he married Mary Stuart, and they settled first in Philadelphia, but afterward removed to North Carolina, and from there to Bryan’s Station in Kentucky. Here their son Joseph married Nary Finley, and settled in Warren County, Kentucky. In 1818 he removed to Missouri, and settled on Brush creek in Montgomery County, where he died in 1830. His children were Hannah, William, Isaac, George, Sarah, Rachel, James, and Mary. Hannah married Asa Williams, who was an early settler of Montgomery County. William, Isaac and George married sisters, named Price, of Kentucky. William had three children, who settled in Missouri after the death of their parents. Isaac and George also settled in Montgomery County, but the latter removed to Clark County in 1837, where he still resides. Sarah married Stephen Finley, who settled in Wisconsin in 1846. Rachel married John P. Glover, who settled in Oregon. James married Margaret Williams, of Ohio. Mary married Presley Anderson, who died in 1848, and who was Sheriff of Montgomery County at the time. He left a widow and five children, who still live in Montgomery...

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Biographical Sketch of Charles Howard

Charles Howard, of Halifax County, Virginia, married Nancy Lewis, and settled in Warren County, Kentucky. One of their sons, named Joseph, married Malinda Lennox, and settled in Montgomery County, Missouri, in 1818. Their children were Sylvesta, Cynthia E., Elijah, Rachel, Estelle, Cordelia, and Malinda. Mr. Howard’s first wife died, and he was married again to Phoebe Saylor, by whom he had John and George. She also died, and he married a lady named McCormack, by whom he had Greenup, Nancy, and Matilda. He was married the fourth time to Sydney Hall, by whom he had Joseph W. and a daughter. He was married the fifth time to Nancy Bladenburg, but they had no...

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Biography of William E. Ellington

William E. Ellington is at. the head of one of the leading productive industries at Kansas City as senior partner in the Ellington-McCarthy Motor Company. He was born in Homer, Louisiana, April 11, 1882, a son of William H. and Rebecca (Jordan) Ellington. The father, a native of Georgia, became the owner of a sugar plantation at Homer, Louisiana, and was one of the substantial business men of that locality. His political allegiance was given to the democratic party and his religious faith was that of the Methodist Episcopal church, South. He was a typical gentleman of the old school, courtly, kindly and with a high sense of honor. William E. Ellington attended the public schools of New Orleans and also Ogden College at Bowling Green, Kentucky, from which he was graduated with the Bachelor of Arts degree. He turned his attention to the banking business as a clerk in the Commercial National Bank, one of the oldest banking institutions of Shreveport, Louisiana, and later he went to Dallas, Texas, where he represented the J. I. Case Plow Works, having ten salesmen under his direction at that point. In 1913 he was transferred to the Kansas City branch of the business as sales manager and continued In that position until 1916, when he was made sales manager for the Grant Motor Company of Kansas City. Thus he continued until...

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Biography of Judge John P. Collier

JUDGE JOHN P. COLLIER. The philosophy of success in life is an interesting study, and affords a lesson from which others can profit. In choosing a pursuit in life, taste, mental gifts, opportunity and disposition to labor, should be considered, as many a young man who has a disposition to become a respectable and useful citizen desires to succeed therein. On the 15th of July, 1842, a boy was born in Warren County, Kentucky, who grew up to sturdy manhood, ambitious to excel and possessing much energy and determination, attributes which are essential to success in any calling. This boy was John P. Collier, now judge of the Probate Court of Christian County, Missouri He is the youngest but one of a family of twelve children, born to Bartley and Elizabeth (Eaton) Collier. This family came originally from England and settled in some of the New England States at an early day. Bartley Collier was a native of one of the Southern States, and a lifelong farmer. He and his wife both died in Kentucky, the father in 1852, and the mother in 1875. They were Methodists in religious belief, and some members of this family were Republicans and others Democrats in politics. Of their children, our subject was the only one to come to this section. His brother, P. P. Collier, was lieutenant in the Federal Army during...

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Biography of William Proctor, M. D.

WILLIAM PROCTOR, M. D. (deceased), was a physician who always loved knowledge and as a physician was devoted to his profession, careful in his investigations and gave all the time he could find in his busy life to books and periodicals devoted to medicine and surgery. His range of information was broad, and during the many years he pursued the calling of AEsculapius he won a wide reputation and a large practice. He was born in Petersburg, Virginia, in 1826, and died January 10, 1890, when sixty-four years of age. He was a graduate of William and Mary College, of Virginia, and studied law under his father, Thomas Proctor, who subsequently moved to Tennessee, where the Doctor was his stenographer. During the Mexican war the Doctor joined a Tennessee regiment and fought through the war. He was in the battle of Buena Vista and the City of Mexico, and had command of the flags on the rampart. For bravery he was promoted to the rank of captain on the battlefield at Chepultepec, when seventeen years of age. After the war he went to Warren County, Kentucky; where he studied medicine. Later he went to the University of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia, and subsequently began practicing in Warren County. When the Civil War broke out he was Government contractor for the Federal Government and furnished a post at Bowling Green with...

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Biographical Sketch of Hardin Camp

Hardin Camp, of South Carolina, was of English parentage. He served his country in two of its principal wars the revolution and the war of 1812. He married Sarah Hawkins, and settled in Warren Co., Ky. Their children were Josiah, Thomas, Hawkins, Joseph, Sarah, and Elizabeth. Thomas married Sarah Middleton, of Kentucky, and settled in Missouri in 1842. He died soon after, leaving a widow and nine children. Joseph married Nancy Shackelford, of Madison Co., Ky., and settled in Warren Co., Mo., in 1836. His children were Hiram H., Josiah, Mahala, Angeline, Sarah, Elizabeth, Martha, Judith A., and Mary. Mr. Camp had intended to settle in Howard, Co., Mo., but when he reached Jones’ farm, where Jonesburg now stands, his wagon mired down, and he concluded to stop there. So he bought land in the vicinity, and settled upon it. He was Judge of the County Court of Warren Co., Ky., before he left that...

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Biography of John Henry Keith

John Henry Keith. From his native state of Kentucky, where his ancestors had lived for generations, and where he was admitted to the bar, John Henry Keith came west about twenty-five years ago, and the greater part of the time has been in active practice as a lawyer at Coffeyville. Along with a large clientage he has developed many interests that connect him with the oil and gas industry of the Mid-Continent field, and he long since reached that position where he can be properly spoken of as a successful and prosperous man. His birth occurred in Warren County, Kentucky, December 3, 1867. The Keith family originated in Scotland, and in colonial days was transplanted to Pennsylvania. One of the early governors of the Province of Pennsylvania was Sir William Keith. The old home built by Governor Keith in Bucks County twenty miles northeast of Philadelphia is still standing. Mr. Keith had one ancestor, Alexander Keith, who served with a Virginia regiment in the Continental line during the Revolution. Mr. Keith’s grandfather, Rev. John Keith, was born in Kentucky in 1816, was for many years an active Baptist minister, and died in Warren County of that state in 1891. He married Mary Edwards, who was born in Virginia, and the Edwards family also furnished soldiers to the Revolution from Virginia. Ivey Keith, father of John H. Keith of Coffeyville,...

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Biography of P.C. Isbell

P. C. Isbell. His parents were both born in Warren County, Kentucky. His father was of English descent; his mother of German and a granddaughter of Frederick Stump, an early settler in Davidson County, Tennessee. He was born in Warren County, Kentucky. His father moved to Jackson County, Missouri, when he was a small boy, where he grew up in the dark backwoods and never attended school. He had a fine working education. His mother taught him to spell, read, and write and a few rules in arithmetic, what she knew. He mastered Webster’s “blue back.” and then engaged as a schoolteacher, which he followed for several years, working his way up to a high grade in the English language. After leaving the schoolhouse, he continued his studies in all the departments useful in practical life. He came to Tennessee in 1850, read law in the office of Hon. W. P. Hickerson, in Manchester, was admitted to the bar in 1852, and has continued in the practice at that place ever since. His father was a Whig and an uncompromising supporter of Henry Clay. He was schooled in the doctrines of the Whig party, and the old Baptist Church doctrine, which his parents held sacred. He is one of the few men who have gotten away from all of their early political and religious teaching. He works up all...

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Warren County, Kentucky Census Records

1790 Warren County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1790 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1800 Warren County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1800 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1810 Warren County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1810 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Warren County USGenWeb Archives Project Owens Surname Hosted at Census Guide 1810 U.S. Census Guide 1820 Warren County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1820 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1820 Warren County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Census Guide 1820 U.S. Census Guide 1830 Warren County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1830 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1830 Warren County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Warren County USGenWeb Archives Project Census Enumeration File 1 Of 6 Census Enumeration File 2 Of 6 Census Enumeration File 3 Of 6 Census Enumeration File 4 Of 6 Census Enumeration File 5 Of 6 Census Enumeration File 6 Of 6 Hosted at RootsWeb Census, Partial Census Transcription (File 1 of 6) Census Transcription (File 2 of 6) Census Transcription (File 3 of 6) Census Transcription (File 4 of 6) Census Transcription...

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Biographical Sketch of Gen. G. M. Mitchell

Gen. G. M. Mitchell, Postmaster, Charleston, was born in Warren Co., Ky., Oct. 5, 1835. His father, Bedford Mitchell, came to Coles Co. in 1851 and settled in Paradise Township, where he died in 1856. In 1852, the subject of this sketch, then a lad of 17, entered a store in Paradise, as clerk for Cunningham & Son, where he remained six years. He then followed merchandising for himself until 1859, when he was appointed Deputy Sheriff under Malden Jones, and served until May, 1860. On the 18t of May, 1860, he married Miss Kate Miles, daughter of John Miles, of Charleston, and has seven children. Removing to Mattoon, he formed a partnership with John Cunningham, under the firm name of Mitchell & Cunningham, and continued in general merchandise business until the breaking-out of the rebellion. In June, 1861, he entered the army as Captain of Co. C 18th. V. C. – the first three-years regiment to leave the State. He served with that regiment till February, 1862, when he was promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel of the 54th I. V. I. In October, 1863, was promoted to Colonel. In 1864, he re-enlisted with his regiment as a veteran, and in the fall of the same year was brevetted Brigadier General, and was mustered out of the service Nov. 3, 1865, having served actively and continuously for nearly five years; he...

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